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70% of Japanese firms keep, expand business in Myanmar after coup

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70% of Japanese firms keep, expand business in Myanmar after coup

Who said a military dictatorship is bad for business?

Next, Japanese companies will be lining up for entry to North Korea!

8 ( +17 / -9 )

Money rules in Japan. Saving face comes second. Morality comes last.

14 ( +23 / -9 )

Money first, people last, especially if they aren't Japanese.

16 ( +23 / -7 )

Suu Kyii was just a lackey for western governments and business interests. "Their" woman may not be in power but they can still work with what they have ended up with.

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

It's a disgrace!!!

Tell us the names of companies that are doing this and I will boycott them!

10 ( +17 / -7 )

Well, they are all foreigners so they are nothing more than a big fat zero in the minds of the corporate fat cats here in Japan.

8 ( +13 / -5 )

Money, money, money.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Morally bankrupt, greedy and self centred. Name them and see how these companies and senior execs react to public international censure and their stock options nose diving in value!

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Myanmar is special? Poor human rights? Sure, not great but not everywhere is Norway.

Happy to do business with Israel? Saudi Arabia? or any of the oil Kingdoms? The numerous tin pot dictatorships in Africa?

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Japanese firms and the private sector had long sold their souls to communists and authoritarian cultists.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Who said a military dictatorship is bad for business?

Big oil and other big resource extractors prefer dictatorships because it's easier to bribe those in their authoritarian regimes.

The oil curse — how black gold makes countries more authoritarian, corrupt, and violent

https://www.vox.com/2014/4/10/5601062/oil-curse-explained

0 ( +1 / -1 )

its business folks.

if conditions are favourable for grow of business who will not take own chance to grow business bigger?

welcome in the real world.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Hey, the more the economy shrinks, the cheaper they can pay wages. Morality is passé.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

So what? Why should a private company care about the political situation in any given country?

We are not in the US or Europe where the government can "ask" us not to do business with a certain country.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Sanctioning and boycotting Myanmar ultimately has more of a negative impact on the people of Myanmar than the military.

Countries need to find better ways of punishing governments, or in this case military, rather than action that leads to violence and poverty of the people.

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

> So what? Why should a private company care about the political situation in any given country?

We are not in the US or Europe where the government can "ask" us not to do business with a certain country.

Well, conversely why should we buy products manufactured by companies that support a military government that has killed and tortured thousands of their people and gunned them down using machine guns?

This is state terrorism

Not sure that I am happy with a regime that does this to suppress human rights and democracy.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Not sure that I am happy with a regime that does this to suppress human rights and democracy.

I guess you own a few products made in China. I'm not a big fan of any commie regime wherever that is but why accept the lack of democracy and human rights in China and yet blame the bad guys in Myanmar?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

if conditions are favourable for grow of business who will not take own chance to grow business bigger?

Permanent growth, The philosophy of empires and predatory capitalists throughout history, they have used viruses and cancer cells as their models.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Nothing new under the sun to anyone familiar with pre War Japan’s Greater East Asia meddling.

(From Wiki) Aung San spent the rest of 1940 in Tokyo, learning the Japanese language and political ideology. At the time he wrote that he was opposed to Western individualism and that he intended to create an authoritarian state modeled on Japan with "one state, one party, [and] one leader". While in Japan he dressed in a Japanese Kimono and adopted a Japanese name, "Omoda Monji". The Japanese had planned to make Aung San the leader of the country, but in the end they were more impressed with Dr. Ba Maw, and made him the leader instead, giving him virtually dictatorial control under their direction. Aung San was made the second most powerful person in the government. The government was modelled after Japan, and intentionally eschewed democratic principles and patterns of government. The army, still under the control of Aung San, took their motto, "One Blood, One Voice, One Command" at this time. It is still the official motto of the Burmese military.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Shameful how companies put making money ahead of the most basic morality.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

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