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Central banks worldwide tighten policies to cool inflation

7 Comments

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*Except two. Turkey is also continuing its bizarre policy of reducing interest rates to "battle" inflation.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Headline should read, "Central banks worldwide, except one, tighten policies to cool inflation"

2 ( +6 / -4 )

I don't know about the USA, but this strikes me as an OTT response in Europe. A big chunk of the inflation there is cost push from food and energy. It is not the "too much money chasing too few goods" overheating fallacy of old. European countries are staring at recession, so it makes little sense to make borrowing more expensive. The futures market already expects the price of energy to fall.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

I agree with you. This is not ordinary inflation that should be expected to continue or get worse. It's driven by war- and zero covid-driven supply chain problems that will (hopefully) not further deteriorate.

I don't know about the USA, but this strikes me as an OTT response in Europe. A big chunk of the inflation there is cost push from food and energy. It is not the "too much money chasing too few goods" overheating fallacy of old. European countries are staring at recession, so it makes little sense to make borrowing more expensive. The futures market already expects the price of energy to fall.

>

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The problem has been and will be that the ordinary working citizen never sees the benefit of government policies (in Japan) despite paying a quarter of salary in various taxes and pension contributions.

The BOJ is not concerned at all with the people of Japan and answers only to an ministry of unelected officials.

The Japanese are becoming poorer and poorer…

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Soon YEN will join its Turkish friend.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

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