business

Make yourself invaluable: Ghosn offers exec training in Lebanon

38 Comments
By Samia Nakhoul

Carlos Ghosn, the former Nissan and Renault head who fled Japan where he was facing trial, is launching a university business program in Lebanon, a nation mired in a deep economic crisis blamed on years of misrule, mismanagement and corruption.

Nine months after his dramatic escape to Beirut from Tokyo, the Lebanese-French executive has unveiled a plan to shake up the business school at the Université Saint-Esprit de Kaslik (USEK), a private university north of the Lebanese capital.

Ghosn, credited with turning round the Japanese and French carmakers before he faced charges in Japan of financial wrongdoing that he denies, plans programs to coach executives, offer technology training and help start-ups to create jobs.

Ghosn has found refuge in Lebanon where the economy is collapsing under debts amassed since the 1975-1990 civil war. A devastating blast in Beirut on Aug. 4 compounded Lebanon's woes.

"Obviously I am not interested in politics but I will dedicate time and effort into supporting Lebanon during this difficult period," he told Reuters at the weekend, before the formal launch of his new university program.

At Tuesday's news conference to announce the program, he said: "This is about creating jobs, employment and entrepreneurs to allow society to take its role in the reconstruction of the country."

He said Lebanon's challenge was "the restoration of confidence" not a lack of assets, saying the state owned infrastructure, land and hydrocarbon resources. Now it needed to execute a recovery plan, he added.

"If you bring back trust, money will come," he said. "You can have an excellent plan for Lebanon but if you don't execute it you are not even at starting point."

Ghosn, who was approached by USEK in the weeks after arriving in Lebanon at the end of December, said the business program aimed to offer practical help. He will help supervise.

Drawing on his experience, the focus for the executive program would be turning around companies in trouble, corporations struggling with a troubled environment and how to"make yourself invaluable" in a company.

Ghosn said several international executives had agreed to give pro bono courses, such as Jaguar and Land Rover Chief Executive Thierry Bolloré, former Goldman Sachs vice-chairman Ken Curtis and venture capitalist Raymond Debbane.

The short courses, expected to start in March, would be open to 15 to 20 senior executives in Lebanon and the Middle East.

"The role model is my experience, what I think are the basic needs of a top executive in a very competitive environment," he said, adding that, when he was in charge, Nissan's executive training program in Japan had been open to other companies.

The second USEK program, subsidised by the executive program, would train people on new technologies, such as computer-assisted design and artificial intelligence.

Ghosn said Lebanon's jewelry exporters were among those who would benefit from software to help with designs.

The third program would act as an incubator for start-ups, and he aimed to invest in two projects. "I am mainly interested in projects that have environmental impact," he said, citing the example of a project to turn sewage into fertiliser.

He said was persuaded to work with USEK by the president of the Maronite Christian institution, Father Talal Hachem, and his young team.

Ghosn said he picked USEK, rather than a bigger Lebanese university, because he liked working with an institution that attracted a broad range of students, not just the wealthy.

"These students need help more than anybody else. This is the class that has been smashed by the situation today," he told Reuters. "I’m going to help build the economy by helping to solve problems that every Lebanese is facing today."

© Thomson Reuters 2020.

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

38 Comments
Login to comment

Good for Ghosn, selflessly helping others-bravo!

8 ( +18 / -10 )

Glad he could escape from Japan.

12 ( +22 / -10 )

"Make yourself a fugitive" ...

-2 ( +11 / -13 )

He’s doing good work and csrf.

4 ( +11 / -7 )

Make yourself small enough to fit in boxes?

5 ( +13 / -8 )

“If you bring back trust, money will come”

One thing this criminal suspect cannot teach is trust.

-11 ( +8 / -19 )

It bothers me they people calls him criminal. He might be, but we'll never know until Japan makes a trial for that, with or without Ghosn.

The facts are that he was indeed invaluable for Nissan.

17 ( +22 / -5 )

Go Ghosn!! You are the man!

Glad he could escape from Japan.

same here!

12 ( +17 / -5 )

i like this guy. he outsmarted japan and fled japan and injustice ,as he says.

if hadn't fled japan,he would have died in japan jail. well-done.

15 ( +21 / -6 )

lol, Carlos Ghosn's master class in how to hide in trunk while escaping custody.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

So he can teach how to bribe and be corrupt?? Please.,,, I hope young Lebanese men know better but i doubt it.

-9 ( +5 / -14 )

MeiyouwentiToday  07:44 am JST

“If you bring back trust, money will come”

One thing this criminal suspect cannot teach is trust.

H'mmm, now imagine applying the above to Japan & its ""justice system & govt""

let THAT sink in some!

6 ( +10 / -4 )

He looks great! Gray hair suits him. I suggest Nissan send all their senior managers to his training session in Beirut, they certainly need it.

9 ( +13 / -4 )

if 'some' of the uneducated here know his history and achievements they will know his value and rush to take his classes.

regardless if he was convicted or not, the crimes that he is accused of are not as bad as of Jordan Belfort was convicted criminal and many still learning from him.

and even if Ghosn was found guilty (which so far isn't the case) he should be able to pay back in community services and have a government salary based job as a business lecturer.

killers and rapists are roaming the streets freely yet no one care, good job media.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

It seems to me Ghosn can't get out of Lebanon forerver, even to France and Brazil, so probably he decided to do something for his long life there.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

No interest in politics? This is ALL about politics. Imagine him as Lebanon's leader, and his consequent relations with Japan. Frankly, I relish the thought of that imaginary scenario.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

I would like to follow this course online.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

So teaching people to be greedy criminals...alleged, oh wait, he is actually on interpols wanted list.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

Lesson One: Escape training.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Lesson Two: Don't backstab your boss. The next one might be worse.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

So teaching people to be greedy criminals...alleged, oh wait, he is actually on interpols wanted list

Yes! Ghosn made the best choice leaving behind the Japanese Injustice System.

Do not trust a government or a MOJ over Ghosn words.

Take a step back and absorb the arguments of both sides.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I like this guy's chutzpah... He has really shone a light on the Japanese injustice system, and it really gets under the skin of the black van drivers round here!

9 ( +10 / -1 )

bokudaToday  07:55 am JST

It bothers me they people calls him criminal. He might be, but we'll never know until Japan makes a trial for that, with or without Ghosn.

He is a criminal because he jumped bail and bypassed immigration laws to leave Japan making him a fugitive from justice. As to whether he is a criminal with respect to the charges involving Nissan, we do not know either way because he threw away his opportunity to prove his innocence.

I believe there is a chance that Ghosn may be tried in absentia which of course would undoubtedly result in a default judgement against him.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

@bokuda.

This is japan. Follow japanese rules. He did alleged crimes and is also wanted worldwide. He also did an actual crime in japan.

ive been arrested twice in Japan. One for no dog lead. Another for something I didn’t know was illegal and was treated badly and coerced into a confession. But,

i choose to stay here. I’m not a coward and accept the law. Even if it is wrong and I got injuries, it is the law. He knew he was doing illegal things. Basically he is rich and greedy so he thinks lowly of his host country, it’s people and it’s culture.

-10 ( +2 / -12 )

"Lesson One: Escape training."

Unfortunately, this is not possible in Japanese companies. You have to attend endless pointless training courses that are a complete waste of time. Add to that the countless meetings, then you end up losing motivation and regretting joining a Japanese company.

@Goodlucktoyou

"ve been arrested twice in Japan. One for no dog lead. Another for something I didn’t know was illegal and was treated badly and coerced into a confession. But,

i choose to stay here. I’m not a coward and accept the law. Even if it is wrong and I got injuries, it is the law. He knew he was doing illegal things. Basically he is rich and greedy so he thinks lowly of his host country, it’s people and it’s culture."

Yea but you admit that you committed crimes, so you deserve to be punished for that. Ghosn, on the other hand, did not admit and there was no trial to judge if he is a criminal or not; he was just thrown in prison and was told that the trial will take 5 years! So far we don't actually know if he:s a criminal or not. What if he was innocent? Who is going to compensate him for the 10 years in prison?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I can give exec lessons as well, for free in fact.

Be careful doing business in Japan as a foreign CEO

Always have a backup plan, and a backup plan for that in how to escape from Japan undercover when things hit the fan.
6 ( +7 / -1 )

A good tree will always give good fruits. I never saw him fail.

Nissan didn't like delicious fruits!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

No interest in politics? This is ALL about politics. Imagine him as Lebanon's leader, and his consequent relations with Japan. Frankly, I relish the thought of that imaginary scenario.

Would be hilarious! Diplomatic immunity would let him come visit Japan!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Would be hilarious! Diplomatic immunity would let him come visit Japan!

LOL! Please, please, God make it happen!

LOL!!!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I was very sympathetic at first towards Ghosn, but since then, all those that helped him have paid a price, while he, the culprit gets to start a new life. Something just doesn't add up

1 ( +3 / -2 )

It seems to me Ghosn can't get out of Lebanon forerver, even to France and Brazil, so probably he decided to do something for his long life there.

I hope he enjoys his stay in Lebanon. The country is falling apart. The latest news:

Dark days ahead for Lebanon as crisis bites

In less than a year, Lebanon has been hit by an economic meltdown, mass protests, financial collapse, a virus outbreak and a cataclysmic explosion that virtually wiped out the country’s main port.

Yet Lebanese fear even darker days are ahead.

The country’s foreign reserves are drying up, the local currency is expected to spiral further downward. Lebanese — half of whom are in poverty — soon face yet another leap in basic food prices. Incidents of armed clashes between rival groups are escalating.

https://apnews.com/article/virus-outbreak-iran-lebanon-beirut-archive-0ceaf36ed349004fa82ee8c16791884b

Enjoy your stay Ghosn. By the way, your wife will soon be in a Japanese jail.

LOL

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Be careful doing business in Japan as a foreign CEO

You, Ghosn and Michael Woodford can teach class for this. Especially when things in Japan is doing the opposite way

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@OssanAmerica

He is a criminal because he jumped bail and bypassed immigration laws to leave Japan making him a fugitive from justice. As to whether he is a criminal with respect to the charges involving Nissan, we do not know either way because he threw away his opportunity to prove his innocence.

Carlos Ghosn and his lawyer already talk his legal issue with Japanese scholar and that scholar said that, his issue shouldn't out from company internal.

Please check other scandals in Japan, how they are being treated. No law being enforced at all, even lot of them is really bad compared what Carlos Ghosn might be charged for. So no justice in the beginning for him at all, that's why he left.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

@Goodlucktoyou

ive been arrested twice in Japan. One for no dog lead. Another for something I didn’t know was illegal and was treated badly and coerced into a confession.

You experienced yourself, being forced into a confession. That show no justice at all. Where' that's pretty common in Japan. Not only that sometimes they will threat your loved ones too if you are not confessing.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2003/04/15/national/confession-based-convictions-questioned/

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Ghosn offers exec training in Lebanon

What he will do is much better than most of Japanese oyaji who won't step down from their position even they already over 80s. That lead to no innovation at all in their organization, preventing fresh idea and moves that needed for their organization.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

A privileged, selfish, nasty criminal teaching others how to destroy the world and boost their privilege

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Lesson 1: Don't spend all your life in a Japanese company because you're not going to be paid enough.

Lesson 2: If the Japanese company decided to give you more money so you won't leave, don't accept it. Because they will use it to backstab you.

Lesson 3: When a US President ask you come to them, accept. Don't think twice.

Lesson 4: Japanese prosecutors only care for their 99.9999% and not justice.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I like this guy's chutzpah... He has really shone a light on the Japanese injustice system, and it really gets under the skin of the black van drivers round here!

From the day of his arrest I have had the overwhelming suspicion that he was set up to justify breaking up the joint venture and/or installing Japanese management over Nissan. Mr. Ghosn upset the whole Japanese criminal justice system by refusing to go along with the plan and confess to anything while steadfastly maintaining his innocence. Unlike many western proscutors who collect evidence, sometimes for many years before petitioning a judge for an arrest warrant, Japanese prosecutors typically arrest first then rely on information gained from a coerced confession under inhuman conditions to aid them in collecting evidence against the accused. Mr. Ghosn's refusal to confess and divulge evidence was something the Japanese were not prepared to deal with, hence the endless pre-trial detention. They probably don't have a good case against him but won't admit it. Plus unlike most western nations Mr. Ghosn is not entitled to a jury trial either. For a developed nation that is unacceptable. Under those circumstances I don't blame him for escaping. To H with Japan. I wish the US or France would offer him asylum and tell Japan to just deal with it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites