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New recruits mark 1st day at work, with many ceremonies held online

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it’s the first day of work! i can’t wait to virtually participate in the online entrance ceremony, does the color of this mask go well with my shoes?

-5 ( +8 / -13 )

They are lucky to have a job in this pandemic. Happy for them!

13 ( +21 / -8 )

@Simian, Sorry I don't understand your comment.

Going virtual is another way which is globalized.

When I had a entrance ceremony I had a good time, now the new entrance ceremony is basically the same content. Introduction and greetings.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Why is a ceremony needed? In the US, there is no ceremony. Just another waste of money and time. Shake the Uni Grads hand and tell them to get to work! It's easy, free, and more productive!

7 ( +16 / -9 )

I wish them the best!

6 ( +10 / -4 )

One of Japan's regimental events of the rigid society.

16 ( +22 / -6 )

Yesterday I saw many wearing the same, looking the same.

( Welcome to Japan )

I wish them strength and resilience. Many of them will be intimidated and harassed by their bosses and colleagues. Be strong!

20 ( +26 / -6 )

For many of the new recruits the online ceremony is one of the very few positive sides of the pandemic.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

@rcch

Same! They literally ALL looked the same! How dare they be an individual, and have their own thoughts! I am raising my kids to have an opinion and not just be a "Yes Boss" Woman. They are already doing great. I am not pushing my kids to be highly succesful. They don't need to as I rather give them ¥ then have to work for some wacky boss.

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

@Ricky Sanchez

"Why is a ceremony needed? In the US, there is no ceremony. Just another waste of money and time. Shake the Uni Grads hand and tell them to get to work! It's easy, free, and more productive!"

We are living in Japan. Japan has its own culture. We are not back in America. Things work differently depending on the country you are in. For the Japanese, this is productive.

7 ( +16 / -9 )

We had yesterday 23 new staff.

Ceremony was held personally at our company.

Wow! Very nice!

But I am already more than double age than these young folks.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

the percentage of fresh university graduates who secured a job as of Feb 1 stood at 89.5 percent, down 2.8 points from a year earlier.

That's good news. 90% by Feb 1 is higher than most of the last decade.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

She's brighten up the place, wouldn't she?

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Michael Machida 8:29 am JST

to Ricky Sanchez 7:16a:

Why is a ceremony needed? Just another waste of money and time.”

We are living in Japan, its own culture. Things work differently. For the Japanese, this is productive.” -
4 ( +8 / -4 )

We are living in Japan, its own culture. Things work differently. For the Japanese, this is productive..

It's worth adding, though, that the head of the Keidanren wants to get read of the post-war Japanese tradition of recruiting fresh graduates in bulk.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

You have now sworn allegiance to your master. In doing so you have committed yourself to a lifetime of unpaid overtime and lots of other goodies.Welcome aboard.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

welcome, welcome, and ... good luck.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

virusrexToday  07:54 am JST

For many of the new recruits the online ceremony is one of the very few positive sides of the pandemic.

An online ceremony? No thanks. Welcome to the atomized future under the new normal.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Welcome to a life of soul-crushing conformity, unpaid overtime, rigid groupthink and backbiting office politics. Enjoy!

11 ( +14 / -3 )

Unfortunately my company is firing not hiring in Japan. We haven't had new recruits as far as I recall for seven years.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

At 22 years old, most have entered into a guaranteed paycheck until the day they retire.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Either temporary employment or permanent low-wage employment.

Welcome to the 21st century of a neoliberal Japan! By 2021, the Japanese old ways of life and work are completely gone and Americanized for the benefit of foreign shareholders.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

So many things have changed....not. But admitted, very nice and stylish, in comparison to ancient times. Then, you got only a seat in a ship, your feet locked, and the never ending ceremony was the monotonous rhythm of drum beats, to tell you the speed of rowing. lol

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

I admittedly do not appreciate the cultural aspects, or the necessity to focus on.....

New recruits mark 1st day at work ceremonies

Likewise, the same focus on a toxic seniority complex, over and above performance, innovation, creative skills.

It is akin to establishing an office in the basement, so the new recruits can comprehend, fully realize, they will have years to contemplate there career advancement/promotion.

It is just so counterproductive.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Hopefully these new recruits don't feel too much pressure to work overtime and then go out drinking with their bosses everyday. Ganbatte!

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

@Michael Machida

@Ricky Sanchez

"Why is a ceremony needed? In the US, there is no ceremony. Just another waste of money and time. Shake the Uni Grads hand and tell them to get to work! It's easy, free, and more productive!"

We are living in Japan. Japan has its own culture. We are not back in America. Things work differently depending on the country you are in. For the Japanese, this is productive.

As an American and long term resident here in Japan I agree with your post Michael). This is not the United States and rightly or wrongly so business is done different here. I also would like to add (sadly) that I think the U.S. is not a place worthy of emulation at the moment and it has not been for a while.

There is value in tradition and with all of the good and bad aspects of Japan I do appreciate some of the traditions. The well known journalist and author T.R. Reid articluated this very well in on of the chapters of his book, "Confucious Lives Next Door" about his time living in Japan.

I will have to disagree: For large companies this is a nice tradition - if necessary virtually.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

I agree with Tokyo-Engr

Do not emulate - I love the culture!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Wishing all the success to the new grads.

Stay strong, stick to your ground never accepting harassment from older peers and ALWAYS challenge the status quo, Japan needs that attitude from younger generations more than ever, to ensure a competitive and successful economy for decades to come.

The old ways ain’t working anymore! It’s now or never younger generations!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Fresh meat for the grinder.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

These new recruits must not be condemned to a Japanese work culture of a hierarchical relationship of seniority.

The senpai/kouhai , the senpai element delegates, the kouhai delivers, only for the senpai take the credit.  

Put the brake on all that nonsense.  

You are tasked, you own it.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Who needs recruits? Robots can do a much better job, and with AI, the sky is the limit.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

@ Ricky Sanchez

The entrance ceremonies are a wonderful part of breaking new recruits into the world of work. What you do in America is of no consequence here. This is Japan. Why oh why oh why do Americans, perhaps more than any other nationality of people, tend to assume that the American way is best.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Fresh meat for the grinder. Good luck boys and gals.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Who needs recruits? Robots can do a much better job, and with AI, the sky is the limit.

That would only be valid if you take profits generated by robots and AI to generously pay the then not hired or employed people, by the way something that was told us decades ago when the first automated machines and robots appeared. Now we know that nothing is given away from the additional wins made by 24/7 and never sick or needing a break robots. It’s all cashed in into a very few accounts and made the whole system unbalanced, unstable and very much biased. In addition, sky isn’t the limit for AI, the limit is very much nearer. Only in a few special areas, AI has some advantages. In most cases, you also can take common sense, or a calculator, a ruler or even only a dice, bringing you to equally near results...lol

0 ( +1 / -1 )

with a warm smile and a song in my heart, i am glad to see these young people now enter major companies. they can work for the betterment of Japan and as a team they will contribute a lot through hard work and perseverance. it is an important time and they to understanding that its better to work hard in a company and achieve success, than to be selfish and work for yourself. mina-san, ganbatte!

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Maybe from a personnel perspective, I am being disingenuous.

Next door neighbor, has a strange Captain/Admiral Jean-Luc Picard mentality.

Not bald, suggests I fail to understand the culture here. The family have introduced me to the community.

Japan culture has a hide and seek nature. My accent doesn't help.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

We are living in Japan. Japan has its own culture. We are not back in America. Things work differently depending on the country you are in. For the Japanese, this is productive.

Expats can be an odd bunch. Move to a foreign country to enjoy the experience of a different culture and then whine excessively about how Japanese culture is wrong and should be like their country. Every culture has its own traditions. Entrance ceremonies to start the business year mark a new period in people’s lives. Makes perfect sense to me even though my country doesn’t do them.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

My local community is kind and generous, they educate their children locally then cast them adrift in Osaka!

Yet they have built there business successfully on agriculture!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I will never forget when, many years ago, when I was still living in my home country, I met two freshly graduated Japanese enjoying a two weeks long vacation around Europe. They said “probably this is our last long vacation until retirement. In April we will start to work and we will be able to enjoy again a two weeks travel when we will be old”. I always think about them when this season of the year arrives.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Welcome to the world of soul destroying sameness and unpaid overtime.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

30% of them will quit within 2 years, no? And they represent only 30-40% of their age cohort? Not the majority. I told my son don’t work in Tokyo because the commute will kill you.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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