Jeep should retire the Cherokee nameplate for its popular SUVs, according to a leader of the Cherokee Nation who argues it's no longer appropriate to adopt Native American names and imagery Photo: GETTY IMAGES NORTH AMERICA/AFP/File
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Cherokee Nation asks Jeep to 'retire' name of SUV

32 Comments

The Cherokee Nation has asked for its tribal name to be removed as a nameplate from Jeep sport utility vehicles and called for a dialogue with the automaker on "cultural appropriateness."

The Native American group's principal chief Chuck Hoskin Jr asked Jeep's parent firm Stellantis "he does not condone" the use of the name Cherokee on the vehicles, according to a statement.

Hoskin made the comments last month in response to an inquiry from Car & Driver and subsequently held a Zoom call with representatives of the automaker who had contacted him, the group said.

"I think we're in a day and age in this country where it's time for both corporations and team sports to retire the use of Native American names, images and mascots from their products, team jerseys and sports in general," Hoskin said in his initial statement.

"I'm sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car.

"The best way to honor us is to learn about our sovereign government, our role in this country, our history, culture and language and have meaningful dialogue with federally recognized tribes on cultural appropriateness."

The news comes with growing momentum to remove Native American names and images from sports teams in the United States, which many now see as demeaning to the indigenous peoples.

Stellantis, the new name for Jeep's corporate parent following the merger of Fiat Chrysler and France's PSA, did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Jeep has been using the Cherokee name since the 1970s but stopped using it for several years before reviving it in 2013.

© 2021 AFP

©2021 GPlusMedia Inc.

32 Comments
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Given who buys these Chrysler things, perhaps "The Trump" or "The Trumpster" would be a worthy monicker instead. I thought they, Chrysler, might name a pickup at some point with that name given the images we are forced to watch in CMs construction site, poorly paid laborers moving around aimlessly, gruff voce (vochay): "The 2021 Trump! Trump tough! (mileage and performance may vary from day to day)" And those body designers who favor Human physiognomy in their designs (angry faces usually), the front of a pickup truck resembling our dear departed leader's (sadly) unforgettable snout would sell well in the back waters of our fair land. And yes, this is completely absurd but DO NOT ever limit your thinking as to what American marketing departments can think is sane and will bring to market. And I think that a pickup truck with that name and a passable resemblance to its six cylinder, one working spark plug name-owner would sell in America. C'mon Chrysler, you gave us the K-car, America's inferior response to the Yugo, you can do the Trumpmobile easily...

-9 ( +2 / -11 )

Utterly ridiculous, it’s a US product named after a cultural group that is part of the US cultural mix. How is this insulting to them, rather it is a mark of respect.

12 ( +16 / -4 )

Next every village, town, city, county and states will be forced to change their names as well?

6 ( +11 / -5 )

They should rename it the Jeep "steel horse".

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Good move. Imagine a car named the Crysler Jew, the Ford Gypsy, or the Chevy Zulu...

-4 ( +7 / -11 )

Bob, say what?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maruti_Gypsy

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Buffalo Bill Jeep? Ford WASP? GM Amish pick-up?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

JEEP Soccermom

9 ( +9 / -0 )

This is getting out of hand, next is what? Scandinavian countries saying change all names of teams using Vikings, and the list goes on!

The more ironic part is the name was imposed by Europeans it isn't even what they called themselves.

Their name comes from Creek meaning “people of different speech”; many prefer to be known as Keetoowah or Tsalagi.

This is a recurring thing first they ask not to be called by the name that Europeans called them, then they object to the use of the name they don't want to be called.

A certain football team in Canada change it's name in such a situation.

I am fine with it all as long as the same applies to every culture.

No more using Thor in movies or any Greek gods etc.. if it is inappropriate to use Native American, Hawaiian, African, Asian them lest make it everyone every culture.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

A certain football team in Canada change it's name in such a situation.

I am fine with it all as long as the same applies to every culture.

Why does it need to apply to every culture? Different cultures have different cultural sensitivities. Some cultures in the world don't like being photographed, or find it disrespectful to show images (pictures/video) of those who have died.

All cultures are not the same, so why would you want to make a silly blanket rule to cover all cultures, whether they care or not.

It seems like what people do when they go to an extreme, to try to stop people from a reasonable middle ground.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

I think Mr. Hoskin is more upset that a google search of the word Cherokee is more likely to show a picture of a car than of his people. I also find it ironic that by simply including the word "people" with the search "Cherokee", all the images that are iconic of his culture, and likely to be used as a basis of branding, are presented.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Honda has the Stepwagon Whitey and Toyota has a named a vehicle after a terrorist organisatzon.... the ISIS.

I am offended!

7 ( +9 / -2 )

All cultures are not the same, so why would you want to make a silly blanket rule to cover all cultures, whether they care or not.

Yes apparently so.

When people complained that Hollywood was changing the God Thor to a female despite the culture being very clear he is the SON of Oden.

Anyone even from the countries of that mythology that dared say anything was made to regret it.

So no not equal as you can only take and distort from cultures that are located in a very specific geographical area.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Then stop using english/european languages. Don't wear whitey's outfit. Don't use the internet.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

They should allocate $100 from each "Cherokee" branded vehicle to the Cherokee nation. One thousand cars sold equals $100,000 the Cherokee nation can use for its own needs in any way it see's fit. Make it win win for all involved.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Peter14Today 02:24 pm JST

They should allocate $100 from each "Cherokee" branded vehicle to the Cherokee nation. One thousand cars sold equals $100,000 the Cherokee nation can use for its own needs in any way it see's fit. Make it win win for all involved.

Right. And French people can allocate certain amount from every single french fry that was or will be sold. Countries selling the fries as "chips" will be fine.

That is stupid.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Some time in Japan/Asia make you cringe hard at these demands and outrage from some people in the West over the silliest things.

My BBQ sauce has an illustration of a very tanned japanese chef. So do many of my condiments/food, whitey all over.

Do these people find themselves (names, faces) so offensive to the eyes?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Horse ranchers going to complain to ford and fender over the use of 'mustang' ???

I wish I had a car named after ' my people'.... how about ' pasty white limey' ???...great name for a car, future classic.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

agree with most

this is getting out of hand

The more ironic part is the name was imposed by Europeans it isn't even what they called themselves.

Their name comes from Creek meaning “people of different speech”; many prefer to be known as Keetoowah or Tsalagi.

That is very interesting

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Good move. Imagine a car named the Crysler Jew, the Ford Gypsy, or the Chevy Zulu...

I side with the Chief on this one for the above reasons.

Chrysler is just another mass produced car that is getting value from an appropriated name.

Still, the Apache helicopter was always cool for a name and does add some context and well earned fear.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Jeep should redesign it as a cute little hybrid that can still load up the golden retrievers and all the protest signs, endear themselves to the white liberal women who are the driving force behind this, and then they'll be in good graces.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I'm sure this comes from a place that is well-intended, but it does not honor us by having our name plastered on the side of a car.

That seems a reasonable and calm comment.

next is what? Scandinavian countries saying change all names of teams using Vikings, and the list goes on!

Not quite the same. There is no current Viking culture or community.

I think Strangerland's comment about blanket rules makes a lot of sense. I'm not sure why he was voted down.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

The more these Native American names disappears from baseball, football and product names, the more quickly these groups will be forgotten and fade into history. Often times they're depicted in a tough, rugged and positive way and keep their tribes and empires in the minds of the populace.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The more these Native American names disappears from baseball, football and product names, the more quickly these groups will be forgotten and fade into history. 

Well said !!..

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Railing against cultural appropriation, whilst oblivious to how incongruous it looks coming out of the mouth of someone by the name of Chuck Hoskin Jnr.

https://www.forcegurkha.co.in/home-page/

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Jeep should redesign it as a cute little hybrid that can still load up the golden retrievers and all the protest signs, endear themselves to the white liberal women who are the driving force behind this, and then they'll be in good graces.

That's what the Jeep Compass is for.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Still, the Apache helicopter was always cool for a name and does add some context and well earned fear.

Chevrolet in the 1950s and '60s had a pick up truck model called the Apache.

The US Army names all of its aircraft and helicopters after Native American tribes. Thus the Iroquois, Kiowa, Chinook (no, that big helo wasn't named after a fish !), the Cheyenne, the Mojave, the Blackhawk and, yes, the Apache.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

finally richFeb. 24  01:54 pm JST

Then stop using english/european languages. Don't wear whitey's outfit. Don't use the internet.

People have been trying that but whitey gets upset. Trust me. Been through it many times. I can give many examples - don't like you using your own language or dialect in many places (many Natives can tell you this), don't want you wearing your own traditional clothes or hairstyles and will discriminate against you, can't play your kind of music. A lot of what you may think is originally from Europe and America, etc or created solely by white people actually is/was not.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Railing against cultural appropriation, whilst oblivious to how incongruous it looks coming out of the mouth of someone by the name of Chuck Hoskin Jnr.

People just don't have a clue.

Many Indians were stripped of their actual names by the national government and put into "Indian Schools" with before and after photos showing how they converted supposed savages.

The U.S. has a very bad history dealing with native Americans and with appropriating all that they have and are.

It is all rather disgusting, and the Chief is being very reasonable and well spoken. Makes me proud.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The US Army names all of its aircraft and helicopters after Native American tribes. Thus the Iroquois, Kiowa, Chinook (no, that big helo wasn't named after a fish !), the Cheyenne, the Mojave, the Blackhawk and, yes, the Apache.

True, and I have never felt bad about that because it felt honorific and being part of the nation.

Chrysler's Cherokee? Braves, Redskins, Chiefs?? I wouldn't want to put corollaries of other cultures because it would be patently offensive to those cultures.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The US Army names all of its aircraft and helicopters after Native American tribes.

Anyone who knows the U.S. armed forces know that they are bastions of 'cultural and racial sensitivity'. Anything that differs even a whit from narrow, White cultural expectations they are VERY sensitive to and show that sensitivity in various ways of eliminating cultural errors from those people, most often though simply eliminating the carriers. This is a long tradition and gained much strength during the U.S. Army's Native American sensitivity campaign of whom George S. Custer, for example, was a dominant and enthusiastic participant, as were many freed slaves who came to be known as the "Buffalo Soldiers" as they spread 'sensitivity' among and upon the Native Peoples of America.

But Peter had a truly American culturally correct response. Charge the goombahs for using their 'recognized' tribal name:

Peter14Feb. 24 02:24 pm JST

They should allocate $100 from each "Cherokee" branded vehicle to the Cherokee nation. One thousand cars sold equals $100,000 the Cherokee nation can use for its own needs in any way it see's fit. Make it win win for all involved.

Is there anything more 'American' than monetizing your brand, especially when it's a brand name you're not particularly fond of or attached to. Charge those greedy [redacted] through the nose. Native Americans have been forced to accede to so much White nonsense that perhaps it might seem just more pathology adopting White strategies but, here, selling a false name for cash...this would be an ironic justice of the very best kind.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

But Peter had a truly American culturally correct response. Charge the goombahs for using their 'recognized' tribal name:

Might be a tough row to hoe legally if Chrysler or whatever name the company is using today has a registered trademark for the Cherokee name. Abercrombie & Fitch, owners of the clothing brand Hollister has been threatening to sue all kinds of businesses in the city of Hollister California for using the name Hollister in their business name as Abercrombie & Fitch have registered "Hollister" as their trademark. Even businesses that have been in business with that name for decades before the clothing brand came into existence have been sued. Abercrombie & Fitch even tried suing the town itself to force it to change its name, claiming they invented the name, never mind Hollister was incorporated under that name in 1896.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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