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Economic aftershocks of Japan's quake roll through Asia

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"...or in the false belief that table salt protects against radiation illness."

Perhaps they bought salt because many retail salts contain "iodide" which treats the thyroid gland.

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it just shows that in this world today WE NEED EACH OTHER each country, nation, continent, the whole world. Let's be more caring towards each other.

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“Japan is still important but it’s a much smaller piece of the global economic pie and much less important to the global supply chain than it has been historically,” said Moody’s Analytics chief economist Mark Zandi.

This bull dinky

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“Even before the Japan disaster, there was a sense that many multinationals had become too dependent on a single source of production,” said Frederic Neumann, HBSC’s co-head of Asian economics research. “The broad trend to diversify production will not just affect Japan, it will affect China. China’s production has become very concentrated.”

Risky for world's manufacturers to have all eggs in one basket.

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Oil, inflation and,now, Japan seems to be a trifecta.

Philippine cbank is likely to raise its interest rates this week-- its first since August 2008, and a sign that Asian inflation is the biggest concern than growth in the region. A stalemate in Libya will more likely see oil above $100.

Japan’s contribution to Asia’s growth has been near zero for the last five years, says Moody’s.

Japan was on a deflation mode before the quake, and the crisis after that have surely rattled optimism of a quick recovery. With a higher yen-- thanks to currency hoarders-- businesses will less likely be aggressive to invest in Japanese soil.

(Although that doesn't mean Japanese companies will be less competitive as some already moved key operations elsewhere in the region)

For Asian economies, this is an opportunity to strengthen your financial, banking systems, and seek more investments from Japan in your country.

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