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FedEx Express to test 100% electric Nissan e-NV200 in Yokohama area

10 Comments

Nissan Motor Co, in cooperation with FedEx Express, will carry out real-world driving tests of the 100% electric commercial vehicle, e-NV200, in the Yokohama area beginning this week. The e-NV200 test vehicle is based on Nissan’s multi-purpose compact van NV200.

Nissan will provide FedEx Express with a test model e-NV200 to use as a delivery vehicle for approximately one month. Nissan will then evaluate the vehicle’s potential for the delivery of international air cargo. This will be the second test conducted with FedEx, following a similar trial in Europe during last winter.

Nissan has road tested the e-NV200 with several other major fleet companies this year, including AEON Retail Co in Japan and British Gas in Europe. Valuable feedback gleaned from the real-world testing will be reflected in the development of future Nissan production models.

The 100% electric commercial vehicle e-NV200 provides families and businesses with a functional and roomy interior and is intended to be a breakthrough in commercial vehicles, serving to underline Nissan’s leadership in the electric vehicle (EV) segment. The model offers all the spaciousness, versatility, and practicality of the base vehicle NV200.

Employing the advanced powertrain of the 100% electric vehicle Nissan LEAF on the e-NV200 provides exceptionally smooth acceleration and quietness, driving characteristics which are unique to electric vehicles, while keeping CO2 emissions zero at the point of use. Additionally, the model’s enviable cost of ownership – a priority for many companies – will be a highly attractive attribute when it competes in the commercial vehicle marketplace.

Masamichi Ujiie, regional vice president, North Pacific, FedEx Express, said, “FedEx has been implementing various environmentally-friendly initiatives all over the world. Since 2005 our goal has been to make our vehicle fleet 20% more fuel efficient by 2020. FedEx is gradually shifting its delivery fleet to more efficient vehicles and increasing its investment in all-electric and alternative drivetrain vehicles.

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10 Comments
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Considering how short most companies are on electricity, is it really wise to promote EV?

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Considering how short most companies are on electriciity, is it really wise to promote EV?

Please provide actual facts rather than a general statement. Which companies are short on how much power? I haven't read of any.

Do you think the production of oil used to drive the combustion energy is electricity free? Those oil plants must use considerable amounts of power. Oil is about 46% of primary power and you are someone who has been telling us about expensive imports of oil when you are defending the use of nuclear energy.

The charging of the EV's will mostly be from overnight power. Then there's the benefit of zero emiisions at the point of use.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Zichi, how do you think the electricity will be generated?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I don't think Zichi was stating 100% zero emissions. As he and the article stated, "zero emissions at the point of use". This term is used by many to state that while the unit is running, there are no emissions. Have you considered the costs and emissions involved in bringing the fuel for gas-operated vehicles from the ground to the truck? They can lay claim that it will even lessen the emissions because they are not using a fifth of the equation right there.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Who mentioned emissions?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Do you think the production of oil used to drive the combustion energy is electricity free? Those oil plants must use considerable amounts of power.

Well, considering about half of power generation right now is oil, I think I would take 21-30% off the bat (depending on gas engine model and car, some of those 25kpl cars are efficient little buggers) compared to 35%85% (AC-DC conversion and battery storage)85% (average efficiency for a high power motor with start and stop). You end up with the same oil efficiency and much more CO2 released (since coal is also used).

EV cars have no real use unless electricity is cheaper than gas in both economic and environmental sides. They would be much better off with efficient gas engines and hybrid drive systems. Much cheaper too.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

EV cars have no real use unless electricity is cheaper than gas in both economic and environmental sides. They would be much better off with efficient gas engines and hybrid drive systems. Much cheaper too.

EV's could be charged using non mains power, like solar and biogas generators. The new range of EV's will have the batteries inside the actual body, that is, the body will be the battery which will make them lighter and cheaper, and a greater distance for on a single charge.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Why bother with electric when you can simply go hybrid, get higher efficiencies, and still be cheaper financially and environmentally? FedEx should promote turning their trucks into hybrids, it costs less and is far more effective.

The new range of EV's will have the batteries inside the actual body, that is, the body will be the battery which will make them lighter and cheaper, and a greater distance for on a single charge.

Major companies are not interested in unibody designs, they make battery replacement impossible by company maintenance staff, and it's too expensive to keep extra trucks to cover the weeks it takes to repair the thing at a factory. There's a reason why companies use show vehicles like this for publicity, then just go back to their old, tried and true methods. This electric car will be no different and end in a month without any progress.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

basroil

Your link didn't work.

According to this link, 29% of the energy used by KEPCO, is oil.

http://www1.kepco.co.jp/english/fuel/sekiyu_e.html

According to the Japan Federation of Power Companies, oil is used for peak time demand.

http://www1.kepco.co.jp/english/fuel/sekiyu_e.html

According to this link 69% of energy used by KEPCO is LNG.

http://www1.kepco.co.jp/english/fuel/siyounen1_e.html

KEPCO has only one coal fired plant which it restarted in 2010.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Using electric vehicle for such logistic applications like FEDEX is quite practical solution because of very limited distance for commercial use only in urban area. That would be fascinating. If you look at home use case, you should think about where electric power stations are. It seems there're only few stations available even Tokyo area. The more popular EV is getting, the bigger number of stations are necessary. Before expanding into home use case of EV, this trial for logistic services, where they can get a lot of data from, would be benefit for Nissan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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