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Filipino in Japan forms labor union for overseas workers

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18 Comments
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Foreign workers in Japan are, always have been and always will be collateral damage in the event of any economic downturn.

14 ( +16 / -2 )

For me, if I did not like being here, I would go back to the UK - but I really enjoy my life here. There are problems in life wherever you are. If I have a problem, I solve it and get on with things - not blame other people, Covid or whatever.

-13 ( +5 / -18 )

Foreign workers in Japan are, always have been and always will be collateral damage in the event of any economic downturn.

Well, it is depending on the job and the field you work in. And moreover, the working status. Contractors and part time workers are the most vulnerable, whatever the nationality

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Mori said, noting rights such as obtaining paid holidays, which are often not given to foreign workers here, can be restored through the negotiations.

Why on Earth can't the government and municipalities do the job of protecting workers against these widespread abuses?

11 ( +13 / -2 )

This is an interesting development. I wonder if Hirokazu Mori is a labor lawyer? A fledgling labor union will need a good lawyer, income and a support network from other unions. If this is starting in Aichi, I'm also curious as to how the Japan Auto worker's union feel about this? I feel it's a good step in the right direction, but it's also telling that Maria Santos is a pseudonym; this individual knows the reprisals that could take place if they use their true name.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Good luck with that.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

YES, YES, and YES.

Yes to Unions at any time, it is the best way to get the protection needed from employers who have little or NO regard to non union workers.

Worked in the Union for 15 years back home, and the benefit of being a member was the difference between living a normal life or being homeless on the streets.

6 ( +9 / -3 )

According to a survey of the labor ministry, 93,354 people have lost their jobs due to the coronavirus pandemic as of March 5, with the manufacturing industry suffering the most with 20,536 people being laid off.

Watered down numbers, strange that the numbers are rosy but the outlook remains dim. The Magic show, conjure numbers out of thin air. Just around me in one plant I know about thirty people who lost their jobs due to the pandemic.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"Santos formed a labor union for workers from outside Japan in Aichi last June along with 15 other Filipinos after they were laid off or their fixed-term contracts not renewed in the wake of the pandemic."

In other words, you have no jobs, but you formed a labour union? Under Japanese law, that is not possible. It is not a union.

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Unless the union leader is a high level Nippon Kaigi member there is no chance of having any sway. Go on strike! They don't care just import more workers and deport those on strike. The department of Labour, are a buffer for companies. They squash any complaints. Unions are not allowed to be independent of government control. Pretty sad but pretty true!

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Look, the labour union is a good idea. Always. But not in here, especially if a foreigner has formed it. They will be pretty much ignored and frowned upon. And "said the woman, who goes by the pseudonym Maria Santos as she worries her union role may hinder her search for a job." proves it. In a civilised country, where labour union is respected and has the power to do something, giving you troubles in your job just because you're a member of labour union would be illegal and boy, everyone knows what a hitstorm will follow.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I'd like to create a good working environment for foreigners

If it is a japanese company? Good luck with that.

I am the only foreigner among 1500 workers in my company, and this company also have an union.

But you know for what this union is for? Just for showing a good picture of the company to "outside".

This union supports a 14 hours working day, this union supports NO telework here, and so on...

What kind of union is that?

As a foreigner in a japanese company, you don't need a Union, you need balls!

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

But you know for what this union is for? Just for showing a good picture of the company to "outside".

This sum up Japanese society nicely: form over substance. I’m a bit shocked that you have it in you to actually criticize Japan.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

@P.Smith

Yes, like you know I am very Pro Japan.

Otherwise I would not live here.

But of course, not everything is Gold here.

How do you say that? Not everything is Gold that shines, right?

Especially working at a japanese company since many many years can drive your nerves to the maximum.

Honestly, when my company came up with a union, I was suspicious from the beginning, because the leaders of this Union are very Pro-company-management.

So if these Filipinos from the article here want to create a strong union and fight against their japanese employers and management,...then like I said...you really need big big balls.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

AMW holds monthly study sessions on Japan's labor systems and laws

I hope this isn’t about milking the system while one in six Osaka children don’t have enough food and thousands and thousands of families can’t afford sanitary pads for their daughters.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Most Filipinas I've met have had a certain determination and toughness you don't typically see from Japanese women. I admire this woman and wish her all the luck in the world. It's a seriously uphill battle but someone has to start the ball rolling.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

...having been paid less than was stipulated in her contract...

That’s for a court , not a worker’s union. Anyway, although needed to avoid the most extreme problems of exploitation, in general you cannot expect so much from a union. Many of them are even intentionally installed, just to keep the working force willing and calm. Unions have been existing for a lot of decades now. Look for yourself what results are really countable. You won’t find much, neither in your purse, nor in your contracts, if you are lucky and got one, by the way.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Good for her. A Filipina Cesar Chavez. Japan is going to need only more and more foreign workers (and residents) over the next few decades and you can bet that the Japanese aren't going to be the ones forming unions for their employees.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

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