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Pandemic could take shine off moving to Tokyo for work

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And here I was, thinking that Tokyo could take shine off moving to Tokyo for work...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

You can also live on your yacht cruising near the Bahamas while doing some video teleconferencing over satellite lines with your Tokyo customers or business partners

I always thought there should be more of a yachting or boating culture in the Seto Inland Sea.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There never was any shine for me anyway.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Moreover, who wants to live in central Tokyo with all the goddamn airlines flying to Haneda every day from 3 to 7... that's ridiculous.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

its not stopping me from moving to Tokyo

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Good article. Thank you.

This circumstance provides an opportunity to appreciate of communicating for real.

It’s important to create real venues where I and the other can feel relaxed and engaging in deep communications.

One can work wherever, depending on one's life stage, be it raising children or caring for aged parents.

The latest moves positively while acknowledging that it also provides an opportunity to appreciate the importance of communicating face-to-face.

There’s a limit to the use of cyberspace in bringing together ideas and creating new values.

it’s vital that we create real venues where we can feel other’s reactions and mood, and engaging in deep communications.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Not just Tokyo, many large cities around the world will change for ever as people discover working from home or online is a much better choice.

I think it's for the better.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Ohh great I always wanted to live in rural Shikoku and work on the farm or some simple job like that. Although my wife always argue how life is "convenient" in Tokyo. I keep teasing her, where is your convenience now? She could work remotely as she is doing it already since March this year.

Plus the Japanese government gives you incentives, like cheap house that you can own after all. I know it's not the best condition, but cmon this Tokyo crowded and small size houses are ridiculous. Anyway I think in the future we will have cheaper housing as society is getting old and immigration is low.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

No, Japan is not evolving. Once the hype is over things will go back to normal. People will go back to work in the office until 11 pm under the eyes of Tanaka-san to show that they're "hard-working".

yep.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

No, Japan is not evolving. Once the hype is over things will go back to normal. People will go back to work in the office until 11 pm under the eyes of Tanaka-san to show that they're "hard-working".

7 ( +8 / -1 )

For me Tokyo never had a "shine" for anything but over crowding every place at every time.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Didn't you just run an article saying that record numbers of foreigners were relocating to the Tokyo area?

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Been working at home for months and I like it a lot. If you're in IT this should be standard

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Is Japan evolving?

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Telework is great and all...

for those who work in offices and cubicles and are on the pc or phone all day.

Most people on this planet cannot work remotely.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Skyscrapers are the heart of cities all over the world. If they are empty, think of the thousands of restaurants, coffee shops and lunch wagons that service these office buildings. Think of all the maintenance employees who service them. All the supply companies that provide everything from water to stationery.

It's like we're in a snow globe that's had a good shake. Everything will settle again, though differently.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I know teleworking is important during a pandemic (personally I hate it). But seeing empty office buildings is just as depressing as seeing empty hotel lobbies and airport terminals.

Skyscrapers are the heart of cities all over the world. If they are empty, think of the thousands of restaurants, coffee shops and lunch wagons that service these office buildings. Think of all the maintenance employees who service them. All the supply companies that provide everything from water to stationery.

I hope it will be a different story after the pandemic.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

What a discussion without sense, since all that is only a question of money. You can also live on your yacht cruising near the Bahamas while doing some video teleconferencing over satellite lines with your Tokyo customers or business partners and have delivered Tokyo ramen directly on board by helicopter service.....rofl

1 ( +4 / -3 )

My company for example has a massive building in Tokyo that is sitting basically EMPTY! How long can they justify the massive cost of upkeep and maintenance while most of us are working at home? I don't know but I guess we may find out.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Many years of experience have taught me that most meetings are a waste of time. Creative industries where interaction of ideas is important are an exception but there are various ways of arranging this (down the pub is where some of the best ideas in history have been born, and some of the worst!) and formal meetings are in this context the worst.

I can see that the “consensus” culture in Japan might make the change more difficult as will the lack of experience of most managers in taking decisions and responsibility for them.

Reinvigorating the countryside could be a positive outcome of this but for it to succeed there will need to be a policy framework to facilitate the process, and I do not see any evidence of such being a priority or even on the agenda for the government.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Excellent news. I would welcome the chance to live outside of Tokyo and come in from time to time for face to face meetings. I think this coronavirus has give Japan Inc a stroke and drastic change is here to stay.

14 ( +15 / -1 )

It's not a bad thing, imho. Like what Christopher Glen said, "decentralisation!"

I think it's better to have several "Little Tokyos" "Little Osakas" "Little Nagoyas" all over Japan. Otherwise, what'll happen to the countryside in the coming decades?

18 ( +19 / -1 )

What I'm seeing is that the brightest and best simply prefer to work from home.

If companies want to attract these people, good luck insisting that they come to an orifice.

The commute is dead.

23 ( +24 / -1 )

Good. Decentralisation is needed

24 ( +26 / -2 )

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