business

Hitachi reportedly to buy UK nuclear reactor venture Horizon

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Now that they've left the legacy of a dinosaur industry in Japan, they are eager to do the same abroad. It is time to follow Siemens' and get out of nuclear.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/19/business/global/19iht-siemens19.html

Even GE's CEO says nuclear is hard to justify.

http://www.ft.com/intl/cms/s/0/60189878-d982-11e1-8529-00144feab49a.html#axzz2AXOvY4Uy

2 ( +2 / -0 )

They will build the next new atomic plant but without any gov't subsidies.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Good news for the UK.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Nuclear power must be safe in other countries, otherwise Hitachi would not be involved in this, right?

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Safer than ANY other type of power, and I guess certain other poster is ignorant of the fact Britain doesnt suffer from Earthquakes and Tsunami.

Im sure the fear of zombies is at an all time high, perhaps we should abandon all medical facilities.

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Every Tom Dick and Harry is fighting to secure the supply of oil and prepare to go to war for it. May be nuclear is the way to go.

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SerranoOct. 28, 2012 - 11:00AM JST

Nuclear power must be safe in other countries, otherwise Hitachi would not be involved in this, right?

Everything has risk, from getting out of bed in the morning to jumping out a plane without a parachute. Risk of dying or getting serious illness from nuclear is far less than that of coal, oil, gas, or biofuels, which UK currently relies too much on. Those generation systems are also close to cities, so constantly affecting a far larger population.

warispeaceOct. 28, 2012 - 06:38AM JST

Even GE's CEO says nuclear is hard to justify.

That's because they are pissed off they lost the bid for Westinghouse and ended up having to partner with Hitachi at a loss. They got stuck with BWR designs, and the ESBWR certification got screwed over by Fukushima (they entered the final review period March 9th, a day before the quake, and the certification has been delayed ever since). His comments are of the scorched earth type, if GE can't make profits in nuclear, he wants nobody to have nuclear and then GE's gas turbines get picked up instead.

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Britain does have earthquakes but not like Japan and there have been several major nuclear events including Windscale and polluting the Irish Sea.

According to a leaked document, all the EU reactors, about 140, are operating with less than international safety standards and it will cost 25 billion Euro's to update them.

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zichiOct. 28, 2012 - 05:53PM JST

it will cost 25 billion Euro's to update them.

Very cheap considering it would cost 500 billion or more to replace them (over 10 years). Perhaps that's why Germany dropped out, their coal industry lobbied nice and hard against african uranium.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

basroil,

Very cheap considering it would cost 500 billion or more to replace them (over 10 years). Perhaps that's why Germany dropped out, their coal industry lobbied nice and hard against african uranium.

except no doubt, the power companies will expect the money to come the EU, which in the case of Britain, is now illegal since subsidies for atomic power plants are no longer allowed.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Star-vikingOct. 28, 2012 - 10:20AM JST

Good news for the UK.

Yeah great. No need to watch Fukishima anymore on your TV, you can live it.

The Japanese are probably a close second to the Saudi Arabians ('what does the Korean say about a nuclear meltdown?) who I'd trust with my domestic nuclear energy.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

zichiOct. 28, 2012 - 10:12PM JST

except no doubt, the power companies will expect the money to come the EU, which in the case of Britain, is now illegal since subsidies for atomic power plants are no longer allowed.

This post makes zero sense, and isn't even proper English. I can't tell what who is doing what or why it's important.

Even without clean energy subsidies (tax incentives, as nuclear plants never receive anything else) or government sponsored loans a Gen3+ plant has a payback period of about a decade, and an energy payback period of several months (time it takes to add as much energy to the grid and building it took out of the grid). Many countries are still building and planning plants, including England. Others, like Germany, will eventually realize they have no alternatives if they want to cut fossil fuels, and will resume everything in 4-10 years.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

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