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Japan's automakers unveil EVs galore at Tokyo show to catch up with Tesla, other rivals

35 Comments
By YURI KAGEYAMA

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35 Comments
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I hate to see what it's going to cost to both purchase one of these vehicles and how much it will cost to charge one too!

-1 ( +7 / -8 )

The post office delivery vans and bikes have gone electric in our area. I hope to see more companies and institutions follow suit.

7 ( +13 / -6 )

I hate to see what it's going to cost to both purchase one of these vehicles and how much it will cost to charge one too!

As they gain in popularity the price will drop. Hence why I hope institutions etc get on board.

My concern would be the range for the battery and availability of charging. And the impact batteries will have over the short and long term. As they say, at the moment, no form of energy is entirely pollution free.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Decrease in exhaust fumes and respiratory illness alone is worth the switch to electric.

1 ( +11 / -10 )

They are decades behind Tesla.

-1 ( +10 / -11 )

Too little, too late. And make no mistake: they don't like EVs at all. They are just jumping on the bandwagon with no hope of catching up. Introducing more concept cars. LOL

-8 ( +8 / -16 )

There are many EVs in our location and everyone has their outside charging point in the car port which mostly only needs charging once a week.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

That's good to hear. One less thing to worry about.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

mostly only needs charging once a week.

For weekend drivers yes. Full time drivers, I don't think so.

But how do you know? Did you ask everyone?

2 ( +7 / -5 )

In my location owners charge their EVs on a Sunday and you can see the cables attached to them. They also own other vehicles.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Burning Bush

The only EV in my area is a single Tesla. I didn't ask the owner how often he needs to charge it because I would prefer to make that info up.

Do they use 3-phase for charging in the UK?

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

This is the EV I have my heart set on:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X37N0VONDys

It has a solar panel on the roof, so you get 30+km per day FREE!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Toyota would do well to slow walk EV’s for awhile, but continue development toward a next generation. Too much market uncertainty in the US market.

Car loan delinquencies are high, credit card debt and delinquencies are at a record and people have spent their covid stimulus money and the hundreds of billions of PPP fraudulent money.

The early adopters are done and later adopters are learning more of high insurance rates for EV’s, the 30%+ range reduction after four years, impossible costs for collision repair… the list goes long. States are going to impose mileage or charging taxes to make up for lost gasoline tax revenue, charging stations are still too few and wait times too long and the industry is running short of people who can afford them.

And still no plan to increase/upgrade electricity generation and transmission. Generating plants are running at capacity and it takes at least a decade to build new ones. Who’s going to pay for it? The EV buyers will have to cough up more in fees and charges, since they are ones creating the demand.

And then there’s the elephant in the room - copper. Electric motors need copper and there is no way copper mining could be increased to have 50% EV’s in 25 years, let alone seven years.

It’s all crap.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Toyota is a large conglomerate of parts suppliers who are largely against EV's. Toyota is not a market disruptor but rather fighting to hold on.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

how much it will cost to charge one too!

Hi Yubaru

That depends on how smart you are with your smart car.

My friend is a prof at Tohoku Uni.

He bought his Leaf from a dealer close to work.

Twice a week he leaves the car at the dealer for a free charge, walks to the campus and walks back at lunchtime to pick up his fully charged (and sometimes washed) car.

That service is free because the dealer has solar panels fitted.

And it has been free for the past 5 years.

FREE!

gary

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Let’s see how free it is when 1,500 people show up at the dealer to get their “free” charge.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I really hope Japan moves to EV soon.

Moving to the inaka in June, we bought (got a loan) on an IONIQ 5 in June. Although Hyundai have only shifted around 150 units this year, I don't regret it at all. Cost was a little over 6m BUT we were able to get a subsidy of 680,000 JPY

Point being, though, Japan does lag behind in terms of infrastructure, although more EV poinst are cropping up along highways and local areas.

Range is good - get real-world distance of about 430+ km on a full charge.

In terms of cost, I estimate it's half the cost of 'gas' / petrol for full tank, helped by Solar Power storage from our roof. Everyone around us has 2 or 3 cars and must spend a fortune on gas which is currently at 158 JPY per litre.

Decrease in exhaust fumes and respiratory illness alone is worth the switch to electric.

Exactly. Ask which car they'd prefer to be locked in a garage with, with the engine running.

As an aside, for anyone thinking of having ahome charger installed, we had a charging point installed at home too. Our housemaker installed what they claimed was an EV plug, but it turned out to be only 3kw (surprise - for JP-made PHVs / EVs) as opposed to the 6kw required for most foreign makers.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

EV’s creation and promotion will create 2 classes,

those whom can afford them, and everyone else.

This “green energy” ploy is not for a better environment,

it’s for control of the general public.

In this globalist set up, many are phased out of buying homes, and/ or buying cars.

It’s called “serfdom”.

This green energy tyranny needs the plug pulled.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Fossil fuels would run out in approx 50yrs. It's not about green but the inevitable choice for the next generation to switch to EVs.

One thing is for sure though, Toyota will lose a large market share as you saw Akio Toyoda stepped down to not stigmatize the noble Toyoda clan.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

In the USA, EVs are going unsold on lots. The market is saturated. In China, EVs are still catching fire and there are hundreds of thousands that were built thanks to govt subsidies, sitting in rural fields because nobody wants them. Https://youtu.be/hmP7txlXrP8 People who bought Chinese-made EVs learn their manufacturer has gone bankrupt when they can't start the car anymore. Seems they phone home to get approval to start/move. No remote server, no move.

I remember the terrible security if Nissan's Leaf a few years ago. That was an EV. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/nissan-leaf-car-app-offline-after-hack-exposed/ https://www.motortrend.com/news/nissan-shuts-down-leaf-mobile-app-following-security-hack/ Toyota: https://arstechnica.com/cars/2022/02/toyota-shuts-down-all-japanese-production-after-being-hacked/ Honda: https://www.autoweek.com/news/industry-news/a32815394/honda-cyberattack/ Subaro: https://www.classaction.org/news/starlink-class-action-alleges-2019-2023-subaru-models-equipped-with-defective-infotainment-systems

I suppose those warnings are for any connected vehicle. They all have flaws.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

the U.S. startup Ample has come up with a different solution — battery swapping.

This is a dead on arrival solution. Hyundai and Kia already got the fast charging time down to 18 minutes, it will only get shortened from now on.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

NicolòOct. 25  10:17 pm JST

Fossil fuels would run out in approx 50yrs. It's not about green but the inevitable choice for the next generation to switch to EVs

The oil industry has been saying that for 100 years. They even created the name fossil fuels to ask you think there are fossils in it. There is plenty of oil. And, surprise, surprise, it turns out oil is not a finite commodity. Turns out the planet is making more all the time.

Where are you going to get the electricity from, the electricity fairy? We’ll end up burning more oil to generate it. And everyone unjustly hates nuclear power.

Internal combustion engine technology is so good that emissions have dropped so that the total total carbon footprint is less than EV’s for the first ten years. And EV’s don’t last that long.

If you want to talk about emissions and pollution, brake dust from EV’s, which hangs around your nostril height, is far worse because of the heavy weight of EV’s. Oh, and you’ll need tires more often, which is made from what?

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Peter NeilToday 12:43 am JST

Internal combustion engine technology is so good that emissions have dropped so that the total total carbon footprint is less than EV’s for the first ten years. And EV’s don’t last that long.

The figures I have read say 20,000 miles for the US

https://www.reuters.com/business/autos-transportation/when-do-electric-vehicles-become-cleaner-than-gasoline-cars-2021-06-29/

EVs are clearly the future.

And everyone unjustly hates nuclear power.

Well then we have to change that. And not all power is coal or nuclear. Even some hydrocarbon power is better in terms of CO2 than what you put in your gas tank.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

That article was from 2 years ago, TaiwanisNotChina. Things have changed.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Peter NeilToday 01:54 am JST

That article was from 2 years ago, TaiwanisNotChina. Things have changed.

What? Gasoline as an automotive fuel is 100 years old and cars aren't going to start capturing their carbon emissions.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

But catalytic converters are more advanced.

By the way, Nissan and Ford just announced they are scrapping their $5 billion joint venture to make more affordable EV's, because it's too hard to do.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

@Peter Neil

Nissan and Ford just announced they are scrapping their $5 billion joint venture to make more affordable EV's, because it's too hard to do.

Because that's impossible to do with Japanese EV powertrain technology. You need Chinese technology for that.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Peter NeilToday 03:10 am JST

But catalytic converters are more advanced.

CCs don't reduce carbon emissions

https://www.catalyticconverters.com/negative-aspects/#:~:text=Environmental%20impact&text=Although%20catalytic%20converters%20are%20effective,when%20fossil%20fuels%20are%20burnt.

They convert CO into CO2, which is where you may have gotten confused.

By the way, Nissan and Ford just announced they are scrapping their $5 billion joint venture to make more affordable EV's, because it's too hard to do.

More affordable maybe, but EVs are dirt simple to design if even China can do it.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In the last 10 years, ICE emissions have been reduced by 90% from improved engines and fuel mixture electronics.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

In the last 10 years, ICE emissions have been reduced by 90% from improved engines and fuel mixture electronics.

Yeah by burning ammonia instead of gasoline. I'm sure in a few decades they might have a prototype and in several decades have the pumping stations. Meanwhile EVs do the job and are here today.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

EV in Japan makes no sense yet.

no chargers infrastructure.and if have some most are low KW type so charge of one single car may pass 60mins easy.

dont need to mention that most of city people/as target for EV/lives in apartments without any EV chargers.

if you consider buying cost,than battery life and capacity/going down by every single charge/ and maintenance cost/even EV needs maintenance and its not a cheap one/.all in all diesel cars are still cheaper at the end,or even hybrid cars/combination diesel electric or petrol electric/.

someone wrote above about iioniq5 for 6mil.sure after subsidy price is much lower but after short search i can say that car will loose a lot of value in few years or even months.as now there are some ex showroom cars and guess what-price around 4mil still makers guarantee and mileage around 2000kms only...dont need to mention japanese people approach to ROK and its vehicles...but well..enjoy it.

if someone believes that EV are green cars its wrong.did you ever heard about issue with recycling of EVs and its batteries and enviromental risks for nature?

as I wrote above EV in Japan makes no sense at this very moment and still have a very long way to go...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Elon Musk just lost $28 billion as Tesla took a beating. Now Toyota says ‘people are waking up to reality’ that EV adoption will be an uphill battle

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/elon-musk-just-lost-28-214123188.html

LOL! EVs are not the future just yet!

If it is the future are EV cars and autonomous vehicles then invest in charging ports and vehicle parking areas.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

When our 22+ yr old ICE vehicle needs replacing in about 10 yrs, we'll look at EVs and hybrids. In the last 20 yrs, maintenance and repairs have been 15% of the costs, not counting fuel costs. Until 3 yrs ago, that was 10% of the cost, but we needed a transmission rebuilt, so the vehicle should be fine for another 100K miles. Probably will need a new battery and tires in 1-2 yrs. Basically, the next time any unplanned maintenance over $1000 happens, it will be time for a replacement. Next year, will be an expensive planned maintenance of about $1500 to replace all the hoses, water pump, timing belt. That will be the last time we do that work.

I have huge security worries over all new vehicles made in the last 10 yrs. Don't want a "connected vehicle." Don't want remote features or the vehicle phoning home at all, ever. My reading says that removal of the antenna or the SIM is the first step, but with eSIMs there's nothing that can be removed. Some other methods are to remove the fuse for the radio, but then if you connect your phone to the vehicle over bluetooth, the vehicle will attempt to phone-home using your phone's data connection/tethering. All the while, connection errors will be popping up on the glass interface. We shouldn't have to fight to have our privacy. Ever read the privacy policy in a Tesla? This year, they added that videos taken inside the vehicle may capture sexual activities and be shared with employees and 3rd parties working for Tesla. In short, be careful what you do in your own car, since the video isn't yours to control. Same for audio. They record audio. Outside every Tesla, there are at least 2 and sometimes 5 cameras recording everything, without permission of the people being recorded.

I hate to admit this, but in China, Tesla vehicles are blocked from entering some areas over security concerns.

Hopefully, Japan will enable better privacy laws than the US has.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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