business

Japan's wine tipplers see glass half empty as weak yen pushes prices higher

27 Comments
By Tom Bateman and Rocky Swift

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27 Comments
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Inflation can beat the heck out of anything but NOT BOOZE please.

0 ( +6 / -6 )

Nothing trickles down when increased exports are just going to be used to offset the increased prices of raw materials. Such a stupid narrative.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Japan imports about 70% of the wine consumed in the country, most of it coming from France, Chile, Italy, and the United States

Well, there still remains the possibility to broaden this list to keep the prices in check for the customers. Of course, who doesn’t prefer wines from France or Italy, but you’ll might be surprised that quite good wines are also produced in Spain, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, Australia, New Zealand, and so on. There are surely some alternatives out there to provide or consume some very good bottles at prices even better or more bearable than before.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

as much as I appreciate the concern over wine prices, it's a luxury and we should focus more on the prices of necessities

12 ( +16 / -4 )

Oh well, there's always Chu-hi!

8 ( +9 / -1 )

Domestic production of all goods needs to be invigorated to avoid reliance on the fickleness of forex markets

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Major drinks companies Kirin Holdings Co and Suntory Holdings raised prices on their Beaujolais bottles by 40% or more this year, and reduced the variety of offerings.

One of the biggest consumer rip-offs that happens yearly in Japan. The collective mentality that gets sucked into believing the advertising of these companies and spending millions on a product that comes in plastic jugs, down here at least.

12 ( +12 / -0 )

Oh well, there's always Chu-hi!

Let me guess you drink Beaujolais too!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"It's tough but I keep buying them. I'll cut back on other things, I don't want to cut back on booze."

Seems like a common theme recently.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Still drink some beer but we have mostly stopped buying wine and sake.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Hahaha, our wine consumption would make most people's head spin, but with rising prices here's my excuse to finally get healthy.

Damn. If you're still in Japan now and earning Yen, batten down the hatches...we're in a long ride as the country sinks.

-1 ( +4 / -5 )

Time to switch to cheap domestic wine.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Time to switch to cheap domestic wine.

+1, There terrific local wines and now should be competitive against imports.

I am rather surprised some people can't figure out why the switch to low ¥en support - as Homer would say, 'doh, the borders have opened up', time to bring some $dollars to buy ¥ens.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Despite the price hikes, the import-wine still won't be as expensive as the domestic. And it's still cheaper to buy Scottish whisky in Japan than it is in Scotland.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Today  07:49 am JST

Japan imports about 70% of the wine consumed in the country, most of it coming from France, Chile, Italy, and the United States

“ Well, there still remains the possibility to broaden this list to keep the prices in check for the customers. Of course, who doesn’t prefer wines from France or Italy, but you’ll might be surprised that quite good wines are also produced in Spain, Germany, Austria, Hungary, Bulgaria, Romania, Australia, New Zealand, and so on. There are surely some alternatives out there to provide or consume some very good bottles at prices even better or more bearable than before. “

There’s something called Port wine, one of the hidden treasures of this world. a) The wine-producing Douro region is the second oldest protected wine region in the world after Chianti (in 1716). b) For those of you that don’t know (and like to read), it’s an incredibly interesting history, one of the reasons why the British and the Portuguese are such good friends.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There are decent wines produced in Yamanashi, Yamagata and Tochigi. Most are reasonably priced.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I do drink Beaujolais, Yubaru-san. The matured version, not the nouveau!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Drink shochuu. Cheaper than bottled water.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

just greed nothing else.just pure greed.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Major drinks companies Kirin Holdings Co and Suntory Holdings raised prices on their Beaujolais bottles by 40% or more this year, and reduced the variety of offerings.

Drat. I'll have to stick with the cheaper Chilean wines which surprisingly taste better than that slop.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

It's certainly not a necessity, so no big deal really.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

"It's tough but I keep buying them. I'll cut back on other things, I don't want to cut back on booze."

I don’t think I’d trust that guy to manage any kind of investment. He’s obviously not investing wisely if he’s a manager and has a hard time affording imported booze.

Not a wise idea to disclose his real name either. Ehh he was probably drunk!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Most concerned about the rising cost of imported food and energy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

298 yen a great bottle of vine in Don Quite.

Don't really understand the fuss here...

4 ( +5 / -1 )

@Tomi

Indeed!

The vine at Don Quite is fino!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I can understand that US products are a lot more expensive because the yen/dollar rate is very unfavorable, but the yen/euro rate, while it is down, is nowhere near as dramatic, especially compared to the 2018 low. Now .0069 vs .0073

https://www.google.com/finance/quote/JPY-EUR?sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiUwKfYzPb6AhVZoWoFHXTrC6EQmY0JegQICRAb&window=5Y

2 ( +2 / -0 )

lucky that i dont need any alcohol drinks at all.

in case of wine there are many local wines made in Japan and as these are not affected either by jpy/usd/euro rate prices should be reasonable than?,maybe worth to try for people who worry about increased prices of imported ones?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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