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Mitsubishi Motors' all-new Triton pickup truck, which is made in Thailand Image: Mitsubishi Motors Thailand
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Japan automakers tap foreign models to drive sales of recreational cars

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Great. Seven out of the top ten best selling vehicles in Australia last year were "recreational vehicles" (utes/trucks to us normal people) - Ford Ranger, Toyota Hilux, Isuzu D-Max, Mitsubishi Triton, Mazda BT-50, Volkswagen Amarok, and the Holden Colorado. Makes sense to reintroduce them back to Japan.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Holden Colorado?!

I can remember when Holden was Australian.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

Macho macho man, I want to be a macho man

2 ( +11 / -9 )

The size of Japanese roads and parking lots do not fit for these cars, that’s an issue

9 ( +13 / -4 )

I saw a Hummer driving through the back streets of zushi once many years ago, damn thing took up the entire road space. All cars coming across it has to pull into people's drive ways as it certainly couldn't.

Was hilarious.

They'll be more of that going on I guess.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Politik Kills - Holden Colorado?! I can remember when Holden was Australian

The Colorado is an Isuzu D-MAX with a smaller 2.8 liter motor.

im curious if Japan will lift its regulations on diesel vehicles to accommodate all these RVs.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The bed size of the pictured Triton is shorter than a kei truck. The proliferation of kei trucks in Japan, which you can rent as needed, makes these things a poor choice for almost everyone in Japan.

Oversized vehicles are terrible to drive. Body roll on the slightest of curves.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Although they look big, most of the Japanese-designed SUVs and offroader cars are actually not bigger than family mini-vans (under 5m length and under 2 m width) - so they would basically fit almost anywhere, even in Japan. The only problem will be with their weigth, as many underground parking lots don't allow cars over 2t.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Holden Colorado?! 

I can remember when Holden was Australian.

Stop it, you're making me emotional. The avoidable demise of the Australian automative manufacturing industry still makes my blood boil. A topic for another day, perhaps.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Macho macho man, I want to be a macho man

Better to be a warrior in a garden (driving a truck) than a gardener in a war ... driving an underpowered "eco" car.

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

The size of Japanese roads and parking lots do not fit for these cars, that’s an issue

Inside of the Greater Tokyo Metropolitan Area, yes.

Anywhere other than that, no.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Jay Today  10:04 am JST

Macho macho man, I want to be a macho man

Better to be a warrior in a garden (driving a truck) than a gardener in a war ... driving an underpowered "eco" car.

What are you on about mate? Eco cars are great! the only downside is that they won't score you many points with the ladies.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Please do not bring these American sized oil thirsty tanks over to Japan, there's no need for such cars it's just manly men buying bigger toys.

Better to be a warrior in a garden (driving a truck) than a gardener in a war ... driving an underpowered "eco" car.

This speaks by itself.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Funny thing is, I never ran into a situation where an actual off-road capable vehicle would have done the job better than my current car and I go camping/ skiing/ hiking very often. These vehicles are just an excuse for those with miniature men's body parts and massive egos to drive like they think they are tough. In Japan of-course.

-4 ( +3 / -7 )

Please do not bring these American sized oil thirsty tanks over to Japan, there's no need for such cars it's just manly men buying bigger toys.

Sorry to have to be the one to tell you this, but they're already here... and I drive one.

Can we get some Tim Allen grunts up in here?! arf arf

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

Oversized vehicles are terrible to drive. Body roll on the slightest of curves.

I am guessing you have never driven a late model one. Total rubbish, they drive perfect

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The only problem will be with their weigth, as many underground parking lots don't allow cars over 2t.

They don't weight over 2ton. About 1.5 is the curb weight on one

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I can remember when Holden was Australian.

Stop it, you're making me emotional. The avoidable demise of the Australian automative manufacturing industry still makes my blood boil. A topic for another day, perhaps.

I hate to say it but if Holden and Falcon had kept up with build quality like all the other manufactures they would still be there.

Car manufactures do not stop building cars that sell and make profit.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Please do not bring these American sized oil thirsty tanks over to Japan, there's no need for such cars it's just manly men buying bigger toys.

You clearly don't know about cars. They are smaller than say a Toyota Alphard people mover and use less fuel than one. I can name at least 10 models of Japanese made cars on the roads in Japan now that are larger than one of these and use double the amount of fuel

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Australian car manufacturing died when the Liberal party decided that Government funding of the top brands was not aligned with the free market philosophy.

That saw off Toyota and Holden.

Most nations supported their car industry.

Anyway, a year or so later, the "free market " thingo was dead and Liberals were supporting any industry that supported the Liberals...see giant agriculture, mining etc.

Politics killed our cars...not necessarily poor production {Ford was an exception...crap }

I had a Holden wagon with a Buick motor {standard } and I swear I did about 700,000 kilos in it.

When I moved to Japan I sold it for $150....funny 'cause I sold a surfboard for $350 lol

6 ( +7 / -1 )

I am guessing you have never driven a late model one. Total rubbish, they drive perfect

"Drive fine" might be arguable for someone with very low expectations, but no high center of gravity car will "drive perfect". Even my Alphard minivan will drive better than one of these.

I recommend trying a sports car, even a hairdresser one like a Miata or Audi TT. That Mitsubishi costs more than a BRZ. That's a car that will "drive perfect".

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

The only people I've seen driving these so far are the surfer and hip hop bro types in baseball caps who are into copying the overseas trends. These don't make much sense for 90% of people and roads in Japan. Having said that on the rare occasion I see one it does make me think of other far away lands :)

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Please do not bring these American sized oil thirsty tanks over to Japan, there's no need for such cars it's just manly men buying bigger toys.

Sorry to have to be the one to tell you this, but they're already here... and I drive one.

You beast, dude ;) Which one?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The last thing when need here is more gas guzzlers driven by muppets to make themselves look bigger.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Those cars are absolutely awful for anyone not actually in them.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

Those cars are absolutely awful for anyone not actually in them.

But that's the decisive feature , making the difference when it's about own safety or security. You then lose in accidents only against similar size cars, trucks and tanks. Try that walking, with a bicycle, Kei or normal car. The same when, in other countries' suburbs or problem areas, you are in such a big SUV and ten or twenty attackers appear. Still you can probably handle the situation with such a car, but also not if you are walking, on a bicycle or in a Kei or normal size car. So the simple question is, where's the merit when you save gasoline, city silence, environment, but are in a specific situation quicklier dead than you can count to three?

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Crossovers are absolutely worthless and most SUVs are too unless it's actually an off-roader and you're one of the few who really need that capability. Everyone else would be far better off with an AWD stationwagon, estates, kombis, etc.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

I guess the market will ultimately decide. But I really don't see these big utility trucks ever being more than a tiny novelty in Japan. The streets in all urban areas of Japan are just too narrow, and parking spaces too small.

Furthermore, the fact they are made overseas ie Toyota Tundra in the US, Hilux, Triton etc made in Thailand will be seen as a negative to being a domestically made car (which may well be unfair, but that's the consumer sentiment).

2 ( +3 / -1 )

@Sven

The problem is that virtually everyone in Japan cycles or walks, and furthermore this is their default transport mode. Railways are the next fallback. Cars are well down the list except in rural areas where it replaces railways.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

You beast, dude ;) Which one?

Fifth-generation Ford Bronco... ironically the same model that OJ Simpson used to lead a fleet of police officers on a slow-speed police chase in 1994!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

I hate to say it but if Holden and Falcon had kept up with build quality like all the other manufactures they would still be there.

Car manufactures do not stop building cars that sell and make profit.

Agree more with Guru Mick on this, more so as you somehow forgot to honorably mention the indomitable AU Falcon - a car born before its time, which overcame all adversity and became an absolute legend. Mate has an '02 with 450,000km on the odo and it's still going strong!

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

A pedestrian struck by an SUV or pickup truck is 41% more likely to die than a pedestrian struck by a sedan at the same speed.

source - https://transalt.org/reports-list/the-deadly-and-costly-impact-of-supersized-vehicles-on-new-york

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@ Jay

Inside of the Greater Tokyo Metropolitan Area, yes.

Anywhere other than that, no.

Most roads all over Japan are too narrow for those vehicles

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

in Japan customers cares about brand.

Toyota is no one and Hilux/made in Thailand and officially imported here by Toyota?is good seller here,however sales are not that great as are say in Australia.Think about living style here and size of public roads here.Japan is not country for oversize pickups.

Mitsubishi sales in Japan are all time record low now and Triton is not truly competitor to Hilux here so I dont expect big sales at all as previous one was also very minor player.

Domeone have mantioned Isuzu above.MU X are produced in Thaliand as well however japanese emission standards does not allow import these cars here/as same as Mazda BT series/so you will never see some of these at japanese roads.Holden was GM brand and Rodeo/Colorado were rebadged Isuzu cars...but yes Holden brand is history for a while already.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

A pedestrian struck by an SUV or pickup truck is 41% more likely to die than a pedestrian struck by a sedan at the same speed.

SUVs are also more dangerous for the people in them in solo accidents or accidents with non pedestrians. This is because they are more likely to roll than regular cars. They are 300% more likely to do this.

A Toyota Tundra is about shoulder height at the front, giving pedestrians no chance. The flat bed in the back is also very high, so you are much more likely to do your back lifting something heavy into it than a kei truck.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Kei trucks are death traps in big accidents. No passenger air bags. I’d love to get just a single cab pickup for my DIY materials and wood stove wood hunting. Maybe these will bring the price for used pickups down, I hope. Now they’re waaaay over priced. Oh and lowered….eh?!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Lindsay

The Colorado is an Isuzu D-MAX with a smaller 2.8 liter motor.

im curious if Japan will lift its regulations on diesel vehicles to accommodate all these RVs.

Diesel engines are quite common and popular in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They aren't any bigger than a Mitsubishi Delica D:5 or a Toyota HiAce and there are quite a few of those on the roads. A far smaller percent of the population in Japan can afford 4.98 million yen than in North America. That is barely over USD$33,000.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Better to be a warrior in a garden (driving a truck) than a gardener in a war ... driving an underpowered "eco" car.

There is much good to be said about small, agile and quick cars that can negotiate traffic in ways a big pick-em-up truck or SUV just cannot. You can sit there proud in your road hog while I'm slicing traffic and on my way.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

JayJan. 22 10:04 am JST

Macho macho man, I want to be a macho man

Better to be a warrior in a garden (driving a truck) than a gardener in a war ... driving an underpowered "eco" car.

This where it should have been the government's role to limit non-commercial vehicle height, but sadly the race is on.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

They aren't any bigger than a Mitsubishi Delica D:5 or a Toyota HiAce

A Triton is 50cm longer and 20cm wider than a Delica. It won't fit properly in a regular parking space at a Japanese supermarket etc. 50cm and 20cm smaller than a Delica will be a granny type kei car. It makes a big difference.

A Toyota Tundra is huge and needs to be seen in person to appreciate how big and how high.

A Triton has a similar engine to a Mazda CX-5, about 180 horses from a turbo diesel. This will get the CX-5 from 0-100km in about 8 seconds, fast enough for most folks, 1970s boy racer level. The Triton will take about 12 seconds, then lurch around every bend, and probably take a football field to come to a stop. This apparently is driving "perfect".

0 ( +0 / -0 )

This where it should have been the government's role to limit non-commercial vehicle height, but sadly the race is on.

As in, "ooh, please regulate us more, Big Daddy Government!"?

Yeah... no.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

There is much good to be said about small, agile and quick cars that can negotiate traffic in ways a big pick-em-up truck or SUV just cannot. You can sit there proud in your road hog while I'm slicing traffic and on my way.

What sort of "agile quick car" are you referring too? A motorcycle with extremely narrow handlebars perhaps, but even a car that meets kei specifications physically cannot "slice" through traffic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

What sort of "agile quick car" are you referring too? A motorcycle with extremely narrow handlebars perhaps, but even a car that meets kei specifications physically cannot "slice" through traffic.

I am thinking of something along the lines of the very first Ford Fiesta, the Ford Focus or early 1990s Mazda Protoge / 323 (what delightful cars those were). You would be surprised what you can do with a small car in traffic that you can't do with a big wide pick-em-up truck. There are gaps in traffic big vehicles can't exploit, especially in narrow crowded streets.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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