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Japan marks 1st business day of the year

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Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, which was crippled following the March 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

"We will improve safety and quality within multiple operations in our company, and carry out our responsibility for Fukushima," he said.

Unfortunately, many more decades to go.

5 ( +9 / -4 )

ZorotoToday  05:24 pm JST

‘the country refrained from implementing travel restrictions’

I assume this is talking about domestic travel, or travel for Japanese nationals. For the record, there have never been any travel restrictions, so not sure what this article is trying to say

I assume you don’t know what ‘implementing’ means.

TT

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Best of luck in 2023, mates!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I see you dude with no mask!

2 ( +10 / -8 )

"I hope more foreign tourists will come but I'm afraid of the coronavirus spreading again," said Takaoka, 65.

Didn't it spread and is still spreading before foreign tourists were allowed to enter again?

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

Everyone is exhausted from working for about three years on coronavirus measures on top of our usual work," said an official from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. 

You? Exhausted? Your pay, your bonuses, your job security, none were affected, and let's not forget you are supposed to be public servants, working for the people,!

I really wonder what they hell you do on your "normal" job that made you so much more busier than normal. You work Monday's through Friday, and get all holidays off, and dont have to worry about overtime or getting fired!

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Apparently not for a whole lot of people.

I really love commuting on the few business days immediately before/after Golden Week, New Year etc.

Today is Jan 4th and I was the only driver around Kita-senju, Ueno, Akihabara, Sumida by 9am. Not a single soul to share the red traffic lights.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"I hope this year is one with more positive news," the 64-year-old said.

Because everything changes once a new year begins. That's how the gods/ancestor spirts work.

Also, going to a shrine a throwing cash into a pit will surely bring good fortune. At least to the priests at the shrine who get to buy a new Maserati! And never have to pay taxes!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Also, going to a shrine a throwing cash into a pit will surely bring good fortune. At least to the priests at the shrine who get to buy a new Maserati! And never have to pay taxes!

They pay taxes on personal income,

0 ( +2 / -2 )

"I hope more foreign tourists will come but I'm afraid of the coronavirus spreading again," said Takaoka, 65.

Yawn. Omnicron was brought in by Japanese citizens and spread by Japanese citizens.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

I’m sure members of the Cabinet are amongst the least exhausted by the pandemic, asthey get driven home and chefs to cook rheir food on taxpayer monies.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This snapshot is odious and blasphemous because the photographer is taking the picture from the very alter which the worshipers are visiting.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

@Yubaru Your post mentions all the things he said he does but your post also seems to imply he doesn't work at all!! LOL

Everyone is exhausted from working for about three years on coronavirus measures on top of our usual work," said an official from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare. 

You? Exhausted? Your pay, your bonuses, your job security, none were affected, and let's not forget you are supposed to be public servants, working for the people,!

I really wonder what they hell you do on your "normal" job that made you so much more busier than normal. You work Monday's through Friday, and get all holidays off, and dont have to worry about overtime or getting fired!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Correction:

The word "alter" should be "altar".

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

This snapshot is odious and blasphemous because the photographer is taking the picture from the very alter which the worshipers are visiting.

How does that make it blasphemous? Where in Shinto is that defined as blasphemy?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Strangerland,

The photographer is apparently intruding the sanctuary to take a picture from what he considered the best angle.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Your post mentions all the things he said he does but your post also seems to imply he doesn't work at all!! LOL

Glad to see some folks get it!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

How does that make it blasphemous? Where in Shinto is that defined as blasphemy?

Love the folks who are giving the "traditional" peace sign too! There isnt any blasphemy, it's just pot stirring!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

How could the photo have been taken? Donation box, not an altar.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The photographer is apparently intruding upon the sanctuary to take a picture from what he considered the best angle. But that's not the best angle for viewers.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I think the photograph was taken from inside the ritual building which would have required the permission of the shrine.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The photographer is apparently intruding the sanctuary to take a picture from what he considered the best angle.

Where is this defined as blasphemous?

I think the photograph was taken from inside the ritual building which would have required the permission of the shrine.

No, you were right he first time, it was taken from the altar box. Though I believe that would still require permission.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

They pay taxes on personal income,

They pay taxes on personal income that they report. Do you really think the Tax Agency audits how much money ends up in the offering pit?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The reason why I think this photograph is offensive is that the viewers are invariably forced to be accomplice with the photographer who has intruded upon the off-limits area of the shrine albeit he may have had permission. The person gesturing V-signs may be protesting, not rejoicing at it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The reason why I think this photograph is offensive is that the viewers are invariably forced to be accomplice with the photographer who has intruded upon the off-limits area of the shrine albeit he may have had permission. 

Happens every year, and no one says anything. You assume much here.

The person gesturing V-signs may be protesting, not rejoicing at it.

And you are Japanese and you dont know what the "peace" sign in a picture is? Rejoicing? :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

If it were in the U.S., the guy must have gestured his objection with thumbs down. But this was Tokyo, Japan, where V-signs could mean anything.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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