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Japan's top business lobby calls for review of uniform base pay rise system

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"The wave of wage increases has not spread throughout society,"

What "wave"? For most it's hardly a dribble! You are the head of the labor union and you have the balls to make a comment like this?

Guess you have been making your living off the backs of us worker bees and forgot what it's like!

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Yubaru actually they didn't forgot how it is, now they have machines to do the work for them so they don't need worker bees anymore. Just few to control the process, that's it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Yeah.... and instead of giving everybody a raise at the company they might just consider giving those who actually do most of the work the raise and forget the rest. Years ago Japan's system worked because, in general, everyone worked fairly hard.... now, there are too many lazy people just riding the system. Do away with the "seishain" worker category and make it easier to fire people without having to pay a large separation fee.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

That would be an open door to unfair discrimitation, and an overall 0 yen rise for 90% of the workers. It would also give such a dangerous power to all these incompetent middle managers.

-"You asked for a week off this year, no rise for you"

-"I don't like your attitude, no rise for you"

You get the idea.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

I can't properly get behind performance based increases in Japan. The reason being is that will it actually align with production or will it be just another way to force overtime on employees. I can easily picture a scenario where the person that put in the most hours receives the highest pay increase even if that person was not the most productive.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

This issue was discussed on NHK news last night, and while some companies are instituting equal pay for equal work, the overwhelming are not. However the one's that have instituted the new policies have seen a rise in productivity which is a good sign for other companies to make the same changes.

Within less than a generation, Japan has gone from a country of "life-time" work to part time! THAT is sad!

11 ( +12 / -1 )

For a short time the Japanese economic miracle was the envy of the world-no more....

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I can't properly get behind performance based increases in Japan. The reason being is that will it actually align with production or will it be just another way to force overtime on employees. I can easily picture a scenario where the person that put in the most hours receives the highest pay increase even if that person was not the most productive.

I didn't think about it but this could easily end up the norm if attitudes don't change. However, through my business English classes I have met a lot of people on performance-based evaluations who are actually evaluated on their productivity so there's hope! I also heard Fuji-Xerox banned overtime without approval too to get people to do their jobs within the alloted time frame.

The bigger companies are more interested in saving money and getting a good ROI but it's probably the family-owned SMEs that are more of a concern if their owners want to do things 'their way' rather than anything based on evidence

5 ( +5 / -0 )

The Japanese Trade Union Confederation, known as Rengo, will also for the first time set a specific numerical goal for a minimum hourly wage of 1,100 yen to narrow the wage disparity between regular and nonregular workers as well as between small and large firms.

That's NOTHING. If you work 40 hours a week, 40x1100= 44,000 per week 44000x4= 176,000 per month.

176,000 per month when you are working what amounts to a full time schedule is absolute GARBAGE. If rengo is advocating for a 1100yen min that means that there are people out there working full time making LESS than that per month.. and the idiots at Kasumigaseki wonder why consumption is falling and they cant get inflation...

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe called on companies last month to increase wages, a key factor in helping spur private consumption and fighting deflation in Japan. But he did not give a numerical target.

no surprise there... useless pm. I'll give a numerical target. 1500 yen minimum per hour. lets do the math.

1500x40=60,000 per week. So per month 240,000. Still not good but its a start.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Here's a really good discussion on the general state of the Japanese economy. Its almost 47 min long, but its worth a listen. I found it very good and informative.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GaWg-cuEHVs

3 ( +3 / -0 )

First increase consumption tax from 8 to 10 percent. Now demand increase the base pay.

Still consumer spending not increasing. End result still the same. Wonder why!!!??

As been clearly highlighted in several reports, Japan needs structural changes in the society to make a visible impact in their ever degrading economy. These kind of fiscal measures are just short term solutions.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Wow, they did not know this ???.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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