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Japan's inflation falls back to zero in January

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But he's got high hopes

He's got high hopes

He's got high apple pie

In the sky hopes

4 ( +6 / -2 )

If I ran my household the way Abe runs the country, I'd be in jail for fraud.

14 ( +16 / -2 )

Japan's inflation falls back to zero in January?

Japan's inflation fell back to zero in January

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Another one down the drain.

As for other news: you will get a GREAT 0.001% interest rate on your savings account.

Wonder what will happen if everyone terminated their accounts, got all the money and just blew it on whatever. Would definitely make more sense than keeping it at the bank.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Japan's inflation falls back to zero in January? Japan's inflation fell back to zero in January

Plunged, dropped, returned to, what difference does it really make? This is just more proof, on top of all the rest that Abe has no friggin idea about what to do to fix things here.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Plunged, dropped, returned to, what difference does it > really make?

He's criticizing the grammar, not the choice of word.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Abenomics can be officially called "Damenomics."

12 ( +12 / -0 )

While the rest of the world is experiencing much of the same there isn't much to be done! Tax in Japan is already so high that workers find it hard to save anything from their salaries. While the government overspends and sucks the people dry, the people get less and less.....

7 ( +8 / -1 )

He's criticizing the grammar, not the choice of word.

I realize that, but what difference does it make?

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Fallen back to zero in January.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Japan's inflation falls back to zero in January? Japan's inflation fell back to zero in January

@Kobe

The headline correct as is. Headlines are typically written in present tense.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

No inflation, yet products keep getting smaller and smaller...

Beware of those "new packaging/designs."

5 ( +5 / -0 )

So, we can agree that, Abenomics has done nothing to improve the economy. The only thing he has achieved is, higher taxes for the sheeple and reduced taxes for corporations. Cue Frank Sanatra, "And so, the end is near. It's time to face the final countdown!"

4 ( +5 / -1 )

After all of the balleyhoo of Abenomics we have no growth, more debt and less hope than ever. How's your tummy, Mr. Prime Minister?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Abenomics is a sham?????

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Falling oil prices—resource-poor Japan is a major energy importer—and a recent rise in the value of the Japanese yen are seen as further hampering efforts to achieve moderate price growth

You forgot the elephant in the room which is stagnant wages. Noriko Hama, Japan's greatest economist in my opinion, stated even before AHOnomics (her words not mine) got started that this would not work and that ALL YOU NEED to end deflation is a serious rise in wages.

No pay raise- No inflation. Its simple. Abe can't be THAT stupid. My guess is that he really doesn't care about the economy and is just trying to skim as much icing off the cake before the ship goes down with all hands.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

"Despite incentives, Japanese businesses have remained cautious to invest in their ventures and offer meaningful wage increases, citing the uncertain economic outlook."

When are outlooks ever "certain"? 

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If I ran my household the way Abe runs the country, I'd be in jail for fraud.

If you ran your household the way Abe runs the country, your wife and children would be reposrting you to the authorities as an abusive parent.

Because that's what Abe and Kuroda and their cronies are to the people of Japan: "bad parents" who abuse their "children" while telling them that it's for their own good.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"The central bank now says the target will likely be reached next year."

Yeah, like he's said for two years now while the rate continues to fall. Eventually it'll reach the point where even HE doesn't believe himself; methinks Japan will fall a lot further, first, with him continuing to deny his policies have been not only ineffective but detrimental to the nation.

Cue Benny Hill music.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Japan's inflation falls back to zero in January - Japan's economy is in a nice place

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Personally I think Mr Abe is a nice guy.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

always interesting to watch this play out. Wonder what the next side show will be; seems things are too serious right now to suggest distractions. If the yen gets to 110, things will get interesting

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Maybe this will bring it home better

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=EaPTweZ2_fI

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Personally I think Mr Abe is a nice guy.

Personally, between his WW2 denialism and his politic, I think he's a rather nasty git.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

No pay raise- No inflation. Its simple.

Not that simple. Companies can increase wages when net revenue increases, but net revenue won't increase unless sales increase, which won't happen unless customers' wages/revenue increases. It's a vicious circle and unless the government somehow FORCES the companies to increase wages across the board despite no change in net revenue, it's always going to be hard to initiate and control.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

24 arrows....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Personally I think Mr Abe is a nice guy.

Based upon what? Look at Trump in the USA, on the surface he seems to be one thing, underneath, and butt-head...same with Abe.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

As far as I know, Kuroda has printed 400 trillion yen and yet there is no inflation. 400 trillion yen is 80 times the record annual defence budget, more than 200 times Toyota's annual profits and more tha 200 times the total cost of the Tokyo Olympics, more than 120 times the tourism total income. And no inflation. Wealth printed out of thin air with no inflationary cost as far as I am aware. How did they manage to do this?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

"Kuroda has printed 400 trillion yen and yet there is no inflation."

Why would there be significant inflation? He used the money to buy securities from the banks. Those securities pay interest, the cash the banks got in exchange does not, meaning the move if anything would be deflationary in nature.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Jeff Is what Kuroda did just a "move", or did he create 400 trillion yen in wealth, that can be spent on roads and harbours and hospitals, out of thin air?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

"did he create 400 trillion yen in wealth"

The money, actually electronic credits, was in exchange for assets held by the banks, which have since been removed from the system. It was more of a swap than an injection of "wealth."

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Why would there be significant inflation? He used the money to buy securities from the banks. Those securities pay interest, the cash the banks got in exchange does not, meaning the move if anything would be deflationary in nature.

Well he got what he paid for, deflation (again).

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What did they think was going to happen when they rose taxes. Have any of these politicians actually taken a course on economics.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nooo! Abenomics is an abysmal failure you say? (sarcasm, of course). How many arrows is he going to fire? 84?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"What did they think was going to happen when they rose taxes. Have any of these politicians actually taken a course on economics."

It's not what these clowns studied or didn't study that is the problem; it's what they are that's the problem. The vast majority of Japanese leaders are the offspring of former leaders. These clowns have never had a real job in their lives, never had to worry about money or where it comes from and never, ever had to worry about consequences for anything.

No wonder the economy is taking.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

The problem is that PM Abe (and many other politicians) sees the government as the economic driver of the country. Government should be more of a facilitator, promoter, not a navigator.

Strong arming traditional, large, established corporations isn't the way to go. Liberalizing the economy and lowering business taxes would be far more conducive to robust investment than pressing private businesses to make misguided government policy work.

Another option would be to open the Japanese market to more free trade and foreign investment. Competition (domestic or from aboard) leads to innovation, jobs, and investment.

A long term solution would be to support and promote Japan's small, but talented, startup community. Encourage people, young and old, to take up entrepreneurial activities and/or investments. Japan's population is certainly aging, but it is hard working and very well-educated.

There's nothing wrong with a job-type-job, but, it's not the only way people can make a living. The gig and sharing economies offer more opportunity and freedom than traditional employers (who aren't hiring people they way the used to). A mix of tax breaks and regulatory reform could make this happen.

QE, deficit spending, tax hikes, government intervention: these are archaic, Keynesian approaches that just don't work in the modern world.

Cut taxes on income and business, remove byzantine regulatory regimes, and there will be more consumer spending, investment, and growth.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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