business

Kirin implements ‘work at home’ system

20 Comments

Beverage manufacturer Kirin Holdings has implemented a “work at home” system to give employees time for child and elderly care.

According to a report in the Nikkan Kogyo paper, employees who have worked more than three years will be eligible to work from home once a week, four times a month. The work period at home will be from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. (including one-hour break). Employees report when they start and finish to their boss via email or phone.

The “work at home” system is still fairly new for Japan, but has been enthusiastically embraced by those who have children or elderly people in need of care or supervision. However, many Japanese companies still hesitate to implement it because they feel the system “does not fit into a typical Japanese business culture,” Nikkan Kogyo reports.

The success of Kirin’s program may herald the arrival of new working style in Japan.

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20 Comments
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Good for them, I'm a big supporter of working from home.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Wow, progress!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

please make sure beer is not stored/available in the house during working hours.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Great step in the right direction. I'll use some of your products tonight in celebration of this great news!!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Drinks anytime!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

this is fantastic news! the japanese work ethic has had the unfortunate effect of ruining many family relationships due to the extended absence of the mother/father from each other, their kids and their relatives. i hope other companies adopt a similar policy.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I will definitely buy more Kirin from now on. Anything to break up the "typical Japanese business culture."

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Is this really done as an act of "kindness"? Doubtful... Who the heck can actually work and take care of the children/elderly at the same time? Why no paid maternity/paternity leaves? Why not offer them free daycare centers?

0 ( +1 / -1 )

However, many Japanese companies still hesitate to implement it because they feel the system “does not fit into a typical Japanese business culture,” Nikkan Kogyo reports.

Wow. I never saw that one coming...

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Great news Now lets hear the knockers give their negative views as usual

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Is this really done as an act of "kindness"? Doubtful... Who the heck can actually work and take care of the children/elderly at the same time?

That's probably why they have a 14 hour window (minus the hour lunch break) to get their 8-hours of work done.

Why no paid maternity/paternity leaves? Why not offer them free daycare centers?

Does ANY company offer free daycare anymore? That was a staple back in the booming 80's, but I haven't heard much about that "perk" since the market crash in 2000.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

er, make that "booming 90's". :-/

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Why no paid maternity/paternity leaves?

Why do you assume that they don't have a policy in place?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Why no paid maternity/paternity leaves?

According to its employment page, Kirin offers regular employees maternity leave of 6 weeks (14 weeks in the case of a multiple pregnancy) before the due date and 8 weeks after the birth, on full pay. Employees can take childcare leave up until the child reaches the age of 2 years, with full pay and bonuses for the first two weeks, and may work reduced hours until the child reaches the end of the third year of elementary school, for a total of 4 years combined with the childcare leave.

The 'family support' system allows employees to take up to 10 days a year off work to care for sick family members, attend school events, etc. More than 10 days may be allowed in the case of a sick child.

http://www.kirin.co.jp/company/recruit/fresh/recruit/faq_system.html

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Kirin need to be able to properly determine if an employee is productive or not. Those who get their work done will get their work done no matter where they are. Imagine reporting to your Manager everyday in the morning that you are not yet finished with that project that you said would take you two weeks and it's already been a month? Why is it taking so long? Maybe it's too complicated for you? Maybe there are roadblocks that need to be addressed? Maybe you are goofing off? Do you think companies just let employees go home and hope for the best? Working from home for companies should be a privilege. Those most productive, most hard working, most reliable employees should be allowed to work from home as needed because these are the people that management need not to worry about when it comes to getting their work done.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

According to its employment page, Kirin offers regular employees maternity leave of 6 weeks

That pretty much means nothing since Japanese employees are "encouraged" to not take any paid leaves. Japanese workers rarely take any paid leaves because they are pressured not to. I think what they're saying is, "Don't take paid leaves, work at home".

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

A 13 hour day, coupled with bringing work into the home environment? No thanks.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

That pretty much means nothing since Japanese employees are "encouraged" to not take any paid leaves. Japanese workers rarely take any paid leaves because they are pressured not to.

My daughter and her friends are of an age where babies are appearing in rapid succession, and I have not heard of a single instance of a pregnant woman being "encouraged" not to take full maternity leave. Companies do not want ladies the size of small vans cluttering up their offices and potentially going into early labour next to the copy machine. There may be a difference in the length of maternity leave - I've heard of some companies that offer only a month, while others are more generous, with a full two months; but I've never heard of anyone being pressured not to take what they were entitled to.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

The fad is gone. A lot of truly innovative companies are strongly against work from home - Google and Yahoo being two good examples.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yes good news indeed. However, they probably want to head to the office in the height of summer and winter, due to the high discomfort level of a typical thinly insulated Japanese house and the increased electricity bills.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

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