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Lifting of emergency over virus leaves businesses with mixed feelings

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Without sufficient trickle up stimulus (the 100,000, when and if it comes, will largely go to service outstanding debt in an already weak economy) expect consumer demand to lag severely for a very long time. But as long as the banks, political machine and Japan Inc. are secure everything should be alright.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

I hope that the culture of heavily crowed gatherings or long waiting queues will become obsolete. Under the virus crisis, people have come to realise that there are alternative ways of life available.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

noriahojanen

I hope that the culture of heavily crowed gatherings or long waiting queues will become obsolete

Seriously doubt that that will happening. Japanese people love standing in lines for nothing (literally). I saw an experiment once on TV where test subjects lined up in front of a building to see if others would follow. As expected, people started queuing up behind the test group. When the people asked what they lining up for, most people answered "I don't know but it must be something good, otherwise there wouldn't be a line"...absolute silliness!

25 ( +28 / -3 )

Shops and stores will re-brand themselves as NEW! and lines will form. Its NEW! so lets all line up for something NEW!

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Exercise caution and good sense and masks and extra personal hygiene.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

I'm dreading my next trip to a newly-opened department store or shopping mall. They were too noisy before, now they are going to be even worse. Constant announcements at top volume and constant instructions about where you can and can't stand.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I don't go to malls and just visit my local supermarkets and or vegetable markets. Anywhere large and wide and or enclosed places even before the virus very rare and I do not plan to change this aspect of my life.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Many Japanese businesses need foreign tourists money.

Without a vaccine tourists can't enter the country with a 14 day quarantine.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

expressed concern that a business restart without an established cure or vaccine for the virus may not be appropriate because of the risk of a second and even a third wave of infections.

There will be no vaccine for many years. The ones forced on you will be ineffective and dangerous. Big Pharma will laugh in your face and pocket.

seasonal influenza kills the same number each year, but no cure for several decades.

Covid19 has already mutated from weak SE Asia/China version to stronger Wuhan version. Next to the very dangerous EU version and onto the more advanced US version. New version is developing in South America. India and Africa will be next.

second wave.

Dont want to sound like a pessimist, but this new virus is teaching us many lessons about basic personal hygiene. Common cold worldwide is severely diminished for example.

also, 1984 may be better than WW3.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

this new virus is teaching us many lessons about basic personal hygiene.

It should be teaching us about eating healthy, keeping a strong immune system, not drinking too much alcohol, , not being fat, and not eating too much crap.

The vaccine will be great when it happens. But a vaccine is after the fact, being healthy is ahead of it.

I'll tell you, there's never been a time in my life I'm happier I quit smoking when I was younger. And I'm happy that I've lived a life of eating balanced, and exercising. I'd hate to be a fat unhealthy smoker right now, I'd be living in fear in my house.

2 ( +5 / -3 )

@Goodlucktoyou

Bring on the 2nd wave.

Your more likely to die of old age waiting for a vaccine.

My common sense, preventive measures have kept me & my family safe.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

Noting that teleworking and eating more often at home has seemingly become the new norm

Not for the truck drivers/delivery people/doctors/nurses/hospital staff. Whole lotta them.

since the outbreak, Urawa said, "It could take a long time before we see a sizable recovery in demand."

Thanks a lot, CCP.

I hope that the culture of heavily crowed gatherings or long waiting queues will become obsolete.

The long waiting queues have gotten longer.

Shops and stores will re-brand themselves as NEW! and lines will form. Its NEW! so lets all line up for something NEW!

LOL

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I  hope that the culture of heavily crowed gatherings or long waiting queues will become obsolete. Under the virus crisis, people have come to realise that there are alternative ways of life available.

I doubt it, I went to the hardware store yesterday and like most stores here in Fukuoka, everything is packed, so the only thing I can do is go shopping usually an hour before they close with less people, otherwise if I go during the day it’s very difficult to get through as well as Costco. As long as the government gives people options and as long as they don’t stress the severity of the virus or encourage and enforce safety protocols, people won’t take it seriously, of course not.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

You will.never stop viruses by shutting down economies. Deal with it, it's obvious by now that it was never as bad as the media made it out to be when out into perspective alongside other viruses.

Many people don't seem.to understand the implications of economies that are not functioning properly, until it punches them in the face.

Protect the vulnerable, practice good hygiene (as you should have already been doing) and let us get things moving again. Stop cowering.

0 ( +5 / -5 )

The problem isn't that economies are stopped by viruses - there is more than enough money for everyone to get through this without troubles.

The problem is that the 25 richest billionaires have increased in value by $255 billion since the start of the pandemic. They're hoarding it, makign the peons (us) scramble over the table scraps, forcing us to get back and put out labor so they can make more capital.

And people say unbridled capitalism is a good thing.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

this new virus is teaching us many lessons about basic personal hygiene.

Yes, but we should not overdo it. Living in a sterile environment is not good; we should regularly challenge our immune system.

It should be teaching us about eating healthy, keeping a strong immune system, not drinking too much alcohol, , not being fat, and not eating too much crap.

Yes!!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

RE-opening without a antidote is totally iresponsible. WHO is already warning a resurgence and if u watch other countries, the danger is huge.

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

A vaccine may not even be available this year. Countries can not wait until then.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I agree with zichi in a absolutely beyond best case scenario. More and more doctors I watch on UK television are of the opinoin that a safe and reliable vaccination could be 5 years away IF ever. No, we cannot wait that long for society to get going properly again.

We will have to learn to live with it amd continue to promote better hygiene and just hope that one of the anti-virals being tested can save those who do go into the later, fatal stages of this virus . So - TARA TAN KITAOKA - I'd be very interested to know how you would plan going forward on that basis.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Japan is a scary place-there is no concept about keeping a distance, especially at the cash register-they get too close!!!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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