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Mori Building to open new development project in Tokyo as part of push to revitalize city

36 Comments
By YURI KAGEYAMA

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Millions of people forced into an ever decreasing space?

Not my idea of paradise though.

-7 ( +20 / -27 )

Just more and more skyscrapers in Tokyo.

-6 ( +21 / -27 )

Mori Building to open new development project in Tokyo as part of push to revitalize city

All these Mori et al developments of chic boutiques with staff standing around bored selling over-priced tchotchkes and vacant office space seem like rentier capital PE scams.

Given the economic realities of Tokyo I don't see what they will do to revitalize the city.

21 ( +29 / -8 )

Shingo Tsuji, CEO of Mori Building, says he hopes to help Tokyo compete as a world city and destination for foreign investment.

Prior to the bubble bursting, these investment types had ZERO interest in having foreigners involved in business in Japan. Following the bubble bursting, they wanted them, but only on their terms, meaning the money and no outside interference, and nothing has changed, and real foreign investment, in Japan, still lags far behind other countries, because who in the hell wants to invest their money somewhere, but have no say in how it is used.

But with the dollar getting so strong against the yen, it's got to be looking lucrative for some speculators!

-1 ( +19 / -20 )

Tsuji, who counts Antoni Gaudi, Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier among his favorite architects.

in theory (⌒▽⌒)

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

Tokyo,memento Mori.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

How does ever more concrete revitalise the city?

16 ( +28 / -12 )

This story is nothing but PR propaganda. It should say, "Revitalize the city for the top 1% who can afford luxury brands."

22 ( +28 / -6 )

I always found the Mori buildings to cater to the wealthy and can't quite see how more skyscrapers for the wealthy will vitalize the city.

23 ( +27 / -4 )

I always found the Mori buildings to cater to the wealthy and can't quite see how more skyscrapers for the wealthy will vitalize the city.

Because wealthy pay taxes. With taxes, you have nice parks and other things.

-17 ( +6 / -23 )

surrounded by urban gardens designed to help Tokyo compete with world-class cities like New York and London.

They've got a long way to go. Currently, area of Tokyo that are greened 7%, compared to London's 33%.

7 ( +22 / -15 )

The only way to revitalize a city is not building more buildings!

The only way to revitalize a city is to tear down many buildings.

And grow beautiful flowers and plant beautiful big trees in parks.

Parks not only make a city beautiful. The make people in any city healthy!

Isn't that the best way to revitalize a city?

Is CEO Mr Shingo Tsuji reading my comment?

I hope so.

11 ( +22 / -11 )

Revitalize the city? They must be kidding as Tokyo area is already globally recognized as the biggest and most vital city.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

Life should be about community, he said, but “That is what happens when the defining of lifestyles is left to private developers.”

A wise man.

But the rentier private capital is what is directing the LDP and they care not for the public.

The market capitalist economy engine of development is dying as Adam Smith said, killed by rentier capital where it is easier to collect rents and interest on capital instead of working and creating.

Vitalizing labor with high wages that will be poured into the economy with consumer spending would vitalize Tokyo's economy.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

Azabudai Hills will house 3,500 people and businesses employing some 20,000 people, a museum and the prestigious British School.

3,500 rich people living onsite, sending their 2.1 children to the British school. Meanwhile, 20,000 (mostly young women) contract workers barely scraping by and commuting for a couple of hours from far flung parts of Saitama/Tochigi, etc. Now repeat this process all over Tokyo in other mega development projects and you can see dystopia staring us in the face. But never mind, a lot of money to be made by Mori and co.

9 ( +23 / -14 )

Snowtiger

Today 10:09 am JST

Because wealthy pay taxes. With taxes, you have nice parks and other things

Oh, is that right.

The undeclared income of wealthy people totaled ¥83.9 billion in the year through June 2022, up 72.3% from the preceding year and the highest annual level since data became available in the year to June 2010.

from The Japan Times, "Undeclared income of wealthy in Japan reaches record high"

5 ( +15 / -10 )

Do not these builders ever study what is happening in other cities across the world. There are empty office buildings in all of them, my dog, will they ever learn?.........Oh wait, making money is far more important than people.

1 ( +16 / -15 )

Where are the affordable apartments that should always be part of these mega-rich projects?

13 ( +14 / -1 )

Do not these builders ever study what is happening in other cities across the world. There are empty office buildings in all of them, my dog, will they ever learn?.........Oh wait, making money is far more important than people.

Why would they place more priority over the numbers in other countries over the numbers in Japan?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

The only way to revitalize a city is not building more buildings!

Is this based on anything other than your own opinion?

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

Just highlighting some very good comments here. This article is such a PR pamphlet for the masses.

Prior to the bubble bursting, these investment types had ZERO interest in having foreigners involved in business in Japan. Following the bubble bursting, they wanted them, but only on their terms,

It has not changed much to this day.

3,500 rich people living onsite, sending their 2.1 children to the British school. Meanwhile, 20,000 (mostly young women) contract workers barely scraping by and commuting for a couple of hours from far flung parts of Saitama/Tochigi, etc. Now repeat this process all over Tokyo in other mega development projects and you can see dystopia staring us in the face. But never mind, a lot of money to be made by Mori and co.

Right so, these mega-projects only benefit the rich.

5 ( +13 / -8 )

It will revitalize more the Toranomon area, not he city. And will bring a lot of housewifes who want to enjoy a nice lunch.

But Tokyo is working like that, by redeveloping some areas to bring people, it is trendy, then 20-30 years later it starts to slowly fade away as new developed areas are attracting people.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Not quite sure, but is it me who's caught in a time loop, or maybe Mori Building?

Sounds exactly like an article I'm quite sure I've have read in 2010, or was it 2000, maybe 1990?

I wonder if Mori Building is at any point actually analyzing their past development projects in regard to their effect on Tokyo as a whole, or are they just repeating the same big-investor-snowball-scheme over and over again until the next bubble bursts?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Because wealthy pay taxes. With taxes, you have nice parks and other things.

I used to work in a tax accounting office with mostly wealthy clients.

That’s just not true. They almost always end up paying a much lower percentage tax rate than poor and middle class people.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Money grabing.

Even though most money comes from private investment, why do they hide how much is provided by the local state organizations ?

It makes me laught to read that the last project from Mori was LEED platinum but they forget to involve any large green parks.

There is so little environmental friendly points in this type of project compare to houses or 3 storey buildings, where the kids can play outside and have a life.

Any room adapted enough can become a nice workspace.

-1 ( +6 / -7 )

Is this the best AP can do these days? PR fluff for Mori?

5 ( +6 / -1 )

For the unfortunate working the back-end of these monstrosities, such as delivery staff, couriers, utility and cleaning staff, they face 15-20 minute elevator rides going up and down to their destinations, and convoluted basement passageways to park service vehicles. Not very well planned or though out.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Our savings at work.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

I'm not convinced that's not an artist's illustration of the view behind the salesman.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I grew up here in Shinjuku in one of those old neighborhoods, with 2 story houses and mom and pop shops. I knew everyone since I was a little kid, and we kids grew up together. That neighborhood was all torn down and replaced by 25 floor condos. OK, they put me in one as a condition for buying my property about 15 years ago, but I still don't know anybody. The old times were great.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

My aunt lived in one of those post war danchis. Even though they were all four stories tall, we all knew her neighbors and the kids.

Her danchi was replaced by one of these forty story high rise condos and she moved into it.

After twenty years, she still hardly knows any of the thousands that live in her complex.

They might look nice but they kill any sense of community between the people.

This whole article is self serving propaganda

6 ( +8 / -2 )

This is a good way to cook the books and get favorites from the government!! In other words Mori in Japan means Mo-Ri-ches

Mori’s status as an unlisted, privately held company means its disclosures about the profitability of its projects are limited.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

All think is in his profits, the best for the citu is middle class apartments with comunity spaces to share gardening growing bio food, vegetabes, may do that intercalated in betwwen every 10 floors of the 60plus floors hig rise building he s planing

0 ( +0 / -0 )

if the workers can’t find affordable housing, don’t put on old age the lack of workers in Tokyo. Once they own a home, they don’t need to work as much and having to do an hour of train to work for misery don’t add up on the number.

-

Rappongi is beautiful to visit, but this is quite empty and around this was quite old. All the money was put in this building, and around they was not that much done if my memory serve me right. The project around wasn’t not put into motion. This is just a big building at the end who was build on sheep market ground and bought from people who strangely couldn’t say « no ». It felt a little bit empty. Are you sure people live within it ? Some buy just to invest and let the market price doing the rest.

-

You need affordable housing in Tokyo if you want to maintain the city alive. Normally we replace with the same price rang of housing the poor properties to avoid such a scam.

°

M

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Look at what has happened in cities like London where building for the rich has meant that ordinary people can't afford to live there. These mega projects are depressing and take no account of the fact that the CO2 emissions caused by the combination of destroying an existing building and putting up another one in its place far outweigh any 'environmental sustainability' the new building can boast of. How sad that Japanese leaders haven't learned the ABCs of the climate issue that is giving us ever hotter summers. They sit in their air-conditioned rooms and cars, immune to the effects that their policies are producing for the rest of us. Trees are uprooted for these grand projects and Japan's percentage of green spaces sinks even lower. I wish the article had been a little more analytical instead of simply quoting PR twaddle.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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