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Nissan says it will make next-generation EV batteries by 2028

21 Comments
By YURI KAGEYAMA

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21 Comments
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Hurry up!

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Good for Japan..

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Why that company already stay ahead compared with other Japanese car manufacturers?

Because Ghosn already have vision and plan for it long before other Japanese companies.

https://europe.autonews.com/article/20160203/ANE/160209970/renault-nissan-plan-cheap-ev-for-china

https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1090485_nissan-to-work-with-bhutan-toward-electric-car-nation-goal

-10 ( +10 / -20 )

I hate to suggest that any government make regulations but sometimes they have to when companies fail to.

Now is the time for industry and if not for government to set a standard battery shape and functionality for solid state batteries so that they are easily swapable at "energy stations."

6 ( +11 / -5 )

Got a suggestion, how about going back to the name Datsun so people can start buying the brand they once TRUSTED!

-8 ( +3 / -11 )

Meanwhile, sales of electric vehicles are decreasing, as infrastructure/ charging facilities lags behind, cold weather has revealed distance shortcomings, and repair/ battery replacement costs are expensive. Toyota's hybrid model looks a safer bet than pure EVs until the above issues are addressed.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

“Once electric vehicles get going, costs will come down compared to the internal combustion engine. They will also be so convenient. For one, you won’t ever have to go to a gas stand,” Executive Vice President Hideyuki Sakamoto told reporters at a tour of the sprawling facility southwest of Tokyo.

Wow. I think he has been on a different planet for the past 10-15 years.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

Ones say so

They will also be so convenient. For one, you won’t ever have to go to a gas stand.

Others say so

to set a standard battery shape and functionality for solid state batteries so that they are easily swapable at "energy stations."

I say, feel free to go ahead but more important, be prepared for this whole thing to fail.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Swappable batteries probably aren't going to be successful in the long run. There are significant weight savings with using the battery pack as part of the frame of the vehicle like Tesla is starting to do now. Also charging speeds are much faster with new battery packs. Charging to 80% in 15 minutes is probably good enough for most people. Swappable packs mean there will be varying levels of condition in what you get. One day it might be brand new, next it could be near end of life and not offer the same mileage or have a worn connector that doesn't quite seat properly, resulting in random power offs...

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Unless EVs are charged solely with "renewable" energy sources(solar, wind, geothermal, atomic) then it's all pretend.

Oh, and BTW the insurance rates are climbing rapidly due to the significantly higher costs of repair/replacement of the EV/hybrid vehicles. A relatively minor fender-bender is expensive enough for the vehicle to be considered a total loss(cost of repair exceeds the resale value). Good luck with that.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

Oh, and BTW the insurance rates are climbing rapidly due to the significantly higher costs of repair/replacement of the EV/hybrid vehicles. 

Better not tell my Insurance company that dropped my rates going from a I.C.E. Nissan to a 2024 Nissan EV. The reason this is incorrect is because there are a considerable number of safety features in new Nissan EVs that prevent front and rear collision by an EV driver. My EV have stopped on there own saving me from a couple low-speed collisions already. The tech works and saves everyone money.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

By the time Nissan has something comparable, I’ll have a BYD in my parking space.

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

These are very good news to hear that Japanese manufacturers are beginning to move to EV's, and are developing advanced batteries. However, the whole process of moving to electrical transportation and to clean electricity must proceed more vigorously and rapidly. This is crucial and urgent for the world and for Japan.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

We won’t ever have to go to a gas station. And so where are all the EVs of people who live in massive apartment blocks going to charge? Either a store, supermarket, electric station?’ We can’t have cables trailing g down from apartments or out of windows. Until you solve the charge times and where I can charge…. I can’t buy one. I certainly don’t want to be hanging around for 30 minutes.

I want one but I think we have to look at drivers who don’t live in a house and have a garage.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I would be really, really surprised if Nissan can do what is says in the headline.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Really, Nissan?

Can you trust anything they say?

-7 ( +1 / -8 )

@bigP

Can you trust anything they say?

That would be a hard no from me..

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

kurisupisuToday 02:05 pm JST

I’ll have a BYD in my parking space.

If you want a vehicle made with forced labor, zero regard for the environment, WTO rule-violating subsidies, and 24/7 CCP spying, go right ahead.

Personally, I'll pass.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The usual useless announcement talking about what will happen.

Walk the talk !

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

By 2028, that will be last-generation tech. Get out of the meetings and DO IT already. The world is moving on faster than constant Japanese meetings can handle.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I live in Japan, and every driver on a Tesla seems to be in the retirement stage of life. I'm not knocking it they worked hard made their money and now they can spend it how they want. But the Hybrid options here are so wide and there are many options available for small super efficient K cars. I feel Nissan is trying to remain relevant by following a trend that is already showing many cracks, as competition increases and consumers become more cautious about the new EV technologies and their vulnerabilities, only time will tell.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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