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Record 98% of university graduates land jobs amid recovering economy

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Just some clarification.

As far as I know this statistic is misleading, because it counts only students "actively looking for a job" by the end of their last year of college, and who are registered with the college as doing so, which doesn't count for anyone who basically got rejected and didn't look for a job immediately afterwards, or students who got discouraged, or students that do not communicate with their school about their job-search.

Also, it doesn't count for the "types" of jobs they got.

For example, when I graduated from Computer Science, most of my peers got jobs, but most of them didn't get any job remotely related to Computers, and last time I checked with them, their salary was abysmal, and also many of them had already quit that job they got after college.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

But! What the article does not address is, in order for companies to accommodate these younglings, many of the senior employees (40's-50's) on the short-term revolving door contracts will not have their contracts renewed in November/December this year. They will be kept on long enough to train the interns and then let go. My Mrs works for one of the largest publishing companies in Japan and they have done exactly that. They employed nearly 120 of these interns nationally and, at the same time, will not be renewing the contracts of 80 senior 'revolving door' contract employees. The company cited economic cutbacks for not renewing their contracts, but the total salary is the same for 120 interns or 80 short-term contract senior workers and, they get a tax cut for the interns as well. They have effectively employed one-third more staff for the same cost. My Mrs works in the human resource department of the company, which is how I became privy to this information. Many companies are following the same pattern and replacing experienced workers with empty shells to be trained by the experienced and then, cut the experienced workers to increase profits by paying smaller salaries for the same work. While it is good to see all these young people get jobs, the reality is, it comes at a huge cost for senior workers.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

How do you spell p.r.o.p.a.g.a.n.d.a

What recovering economy is being referred to?

9 ( +13 / -4 )

Complete BS, less students went to school and more than likely they all started with less salary.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Twenty-four national and public universities and 38 private universities were picked for the survey that covered some 4,800 students. Each university interviewed students to track their employment situation.

The title of this article is misleading to say the least, and an attempt to prop up the image that Abenomics is the reason that their job opportunities have increased.

4,800 students were surveyed, yet when one reads further into the article the "facts", if they can be truly called a "fact" show that there are nearly DOUBLE the amount of graduates, evidently NOT included in the survey as it would totally skew the results.

With around 8,200 new university graduates estimated to remain jobless, the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare said it will continue to support their efforts to secure employment.

Huh? Then what Universities did THESE unemployed folks graduate from?

Once again numbers/surveys/data put out by the government to paint a rosy picture, when the REALITY is something totally different!

I call some serious BS on this!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Abenomics slogan is a title of a book called FAKE!

6 ( +6 / -0 )

98% of them landed crappy jobs that pay a pittance, and will not use their minds. They will simply follow and hope for promotion.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Baby boomers finally retiring and living life?

4 ( +5 / -1 )

And at the same time, it is very difficult for some firms to get anyone...

4 ( +4 / -0 )

A record-high 98 percent of newly minted university graduates in Japan have landed jobs at the beginning of this fiscal year in April, government data showed Friday, reflecting the nation's recovering economy.

You expect us to believe this BS! The economy is not recovering...........there is simply fewer young people so more competition to hire them, but as another poster mentioned good luck finding people that will actually work out.

There is going to be more & more companies unable to find capable staff as time passes

4 ( +4 / -0 )

It's similar to that bubble economy of '80 to '90. Most have got jobs and many have lost the jobs for their companies went bankrupt. I hope that story not going to be the same for them.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Less companies hiring, less students (a corkscrew) add blatant propaganda and hey presto Fantastic hiring statistics.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Precisely

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Just accept the fact the economy is doing well and stop ranting.

Its a matter of disagreement what people mean by "well." Companies may be making profits, but not hiring. Jobs may be available, but not well-paying. Technically, if I graduate from law school and get a job teaching high school. I've "got a job."

What do you mean by well?

The data is clear: Japan is doing well by global standards by most metrics. Japan has not been doing well for the past 30 years compared with the economic boom times from 1960 -1980. And during that time, China has been booming.

I think Japan is way on the downslide as far as global power and prestige. What that bodes for the future is anyones guess.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Good news for Japanese young people. The demographic cliff will only help them.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

So the economy is recovering. That's good news, though the recovery hasn't reached many of us yet. The low jobless rate of college grads is just a result of shrinking working age population, and not because Abenomics is such a success.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Here's data on economic growth from 1980 - today

https://tradingeconomics.com/japan/gdp-growth

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I think Japan is way on the downslide as far as global power and prestige.

So what? I'd much rather live in Switzerland or Singapore than China, India or Russia.

Japan has not been doing well for the past 30 years

I first stepped foot in this country 30 years ago. The infrastructure, housing and social services, etc. are way, way, way better now than then.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Oh man, you know nothing about stats. Really The article stated that there is an estimated 8200 college grads that could not find jobs. If I use your number that means there is 9600 college grads in Japan and 8200 grads could not find jobs. That means that the unemployment rate for college grads in Japan is 85%. Clearly that is nonsense.

Man you clearly have a problem with reading comprehension. First off the number I used came from the article, not one that I pulled out of the air, which you are doing here.

Where in the world did you pull out the 9600 college grads from? There are well over 600,000 university and college graduates every year here in Japan, and the survey only took into account, 24 national, and 38 private institutions, and yet there are a whole hell of a lot more!

It is very easy to guess which schools were selected for the survey.

> Your math is really weak and it shows. First the number of college grads in 410,000. The article states that 98% of college grads found jobs and 8200 could not find jobs. 8200 is 2% of the total of college grads. Using reverse % you find total number of college grads which is 410,000 roughly.

You can not ask 410k people if they found jobs. First because it is not practical and second you don’t have to. You just have to take a small sample which they did. Their sample size was 4800 which is big enough. In fact, given the population size was 410k, they only had to talk to 800 students.    

Just accept the fact the economy is doing well and stop ranting.

My math? Never claimed to be a mathematician but I sure as hell can do simple arithmetic, and I can read too!

Oh and the economy is far from doing well, there is too much evidence to say otherwise!

There is nothing in the article that states what you are claiming here, The numbers in the survey are based upon the top schools in Japan,

. This survey is very selective, and people like you and others who pass around false information should be ashamed.

> As of 2010, there were 86 national universities (国立大学, kokuritsu daigaku), 95 public universitiesand 597 private universities in Japan. National universities tend to be held in higher regard in higher education in Japan than private or public 

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's true that during the past couple of years graduates have had little difficulty in finding jobs. I see many of our students getting positions in their first choice of companies.

I wonder if the issue Disillusioned mentions is related to the new law that allow contract employees who have worked in the same place for more than 5 years to demand permanent positions. That law got thousands of contract staff sacked from my university this year.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Disillusioned

Interesting, but thats probably not the general problem here.

There isnt loads of young people getting oldies fired. We have a really really hard time finding the right newbies for instance.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My Mrs works in the human resource department of the company, which is how I became privy to this information. Many companies are following the same pattern and replacing experienced workers with empty shells to be trained by the experienced and then, cut the experienced workers to increase profits by paying smaller salaries for the same work. While it is good to see all these young people get jobs, the reality is, it comes at a huge cost for senior workers.

Hiring younger people for certain functions as a cost saver is happening in the rest of the developed world too. Nothing new about that. Demotion is another tool by HRM to ensure companies of fresh blood.

As the number of baby boomers exceeds the number of newcomers many baby boomers have to work longer. In most developed nations they increased the retiring age with 2 yrs or more. Interesting times to come.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

or example, when I graduated from Computer Science, most of my peers got jobs, but most of them didn't get any job remotely related to Computers...

It's called a market economy.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The data is clear: Japan is doing well by global standards by most metrics. Japan has not been doing well for the past 30 years compared with the economic boom times from 1960 -1980. And during that time, China has been booming. 

I think Japan is way on the downslide as far as global power and prestige. What that bodes for the future is anyones guess.

China delivered special economic zones and labour after Deng Xiaping opened the borders and has been booming with manufacturing sites delivered and managed by foreign companies where they made and make hi end products engineered and designed in East and West. After 30 years learning the manufacturing skills and 'technology transfers' by acquisitions or plain theft China makes hi end goods by themselves.The low tech textile industry merely moved to cheaper countries but Taiwanese giant Foxconn for all your phone and computer hardware , Toyota, Volkswagen, Asics, GM, you name it, still play an important role in the Chinese economy.

For some 'global power and prestige' is embodied by the number of nukes, the number of billionaires or being the largest economy based on GDP. China is still a development country and the quality of their students aka potential employees is a problem for foreign MNC's. Korea, Singapore and Japan are yet the only developed countries in Asia.

The military buildup by China and till a certain extend India gave them the ability to play geopolitical games, a field where Japan since WW2 never played a real role as loyal US knight.

Japan should let their women thrive in the economy something that the Chinese do way better. Overall the J economy is doing well and companies doing well and not raising wages of their employees is a problem in all developed countries.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Ganbare Japan! : Are you living in a bubble? Do some research.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I've seen lots more Uber eats delivery riders recently....

0 ( +0 / -0 )

"Where in the world did you pull out the 9600 college grads from?"

From you:

 "4,800 students were surveyed, yet when one reads further into the article the "facts", if they can be truly called a "fact" show that there are nearly DOUBLE the amount of graduates,"

4800 x 2=9600

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

4,800 students were surveyed, yet when one reads further into the article the "facts", if they can be truly called a "fact" show that there are nearly DOUBLE the amount of graduates, evidently NOT included in the survey as it would totally skew the results.

Oh man, you know nothing about stats. Really. “There is double the number of graduates”

The article stated that there is an estimated 8200 college grads that could not find jobs. If I use your number that means there is 9600 college grads in Japan and 8200 grads could not find jobs. That means that the unemployment rate for college grads in Japan is 85%. Clearly that is nonsense.

Your math is really weak and it shows. First the number of college grads in 410,000. The article states that 98% of college grads found jobs and 8200 could not find jobs. 8200 is 2% of the total of college grads. Using reverse % you find total number of college grads which is 410,000 roughly.

You can not ask 410k people if they found jobs. First because it is not practical and second you don’t have to. You just have to take a small sample which they did. Their sample size was 4800 which is big enough. In fact, given the population size was 410k, they only had to talk to 800 students.    

Just accept the fact the economy is doing well and stop ranting.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

If 98% got their job, then remaining 2% are lazy and no need to help them to find it.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Amazing news! Further evidence of the Abenomics boom in jobs. LDP is creating jobs growth, and growing the economy. Furthermore, record numbers of tourists. Win-Win for all, and great time to be in Japan.

-10 ( +1 / -11 )

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