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business

Mizuho Financial to allow employees to take side jobs

13 Comments

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13 Comments
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Finally! It really shouldn't be the company's business what I do outside of work hours.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Very interesting. I assume full-time employees are prohibited from side jobs as they are expected to be available all of the time, and there are valid confidentiality concerns.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I would suggest employees just quit outright and focus on their other opportunities, it would surely be more fulfilling and better for personal growth long term.

(I am imagining that working at a stodgy old bank demands trying days of repetitive box checking and hanko stamping, so I could be off base.)

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Very interesting. I assume full-time employees are prohibited from side jobs as they are expected to be available all of the time, and there are valid confidentiality concerns.

You would assume wrong, as my company is allowing the same thing. PT and contracted workers have always had this right, in fact for many of them. it was encouraged, as their schedules, are not always stable.

This is a MAJOR shift, but I am concerned about the rationale behind it, as it appears that, from what I have heard, it's due to companies being unwilling to increase wages for their employees, and instead would rather have them work their arses off even MORE to make some extra cash instead.

Then watch as "complaints" start coming in about "productivity" going down, and the companies firing employees because of it!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

This isn't even about the non-sense in the US of paying a livable wage (which is total bs), but pay in Japan is hysterically sad. Companies pay new employees the same regardless of experience, or they'll want an advanced degree plus experience and still top out at 350,000yen/month. No wonder people need 2-3 jobs to survive.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

A sign of democratic change? A whiff of "freedom"? Like Yubaru, I also smell a rat or something fishy behind Mizuho's ostensible rationale.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

A sign of things going down-hill in Japan. Thank god , I am not in a banking career.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

People shouldnt have to have 2 jobs to support their family. And I mean that for the entire household, not just a single person. In the states, a single family income had once been enough to thrive on, then the spouse had to work, then one of the working family members had to get a second job. Does the economy work for you, or do you work for the economy?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The economy is so screwed that even people working in finance are now allowed to seek an exta income. Thanks Abenomics.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Pretty much what he said. There are losses from low-earning personal department stores and impairment losses on new systems. It may be an action towards restructuring called "structural reform".

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Indeed, another triumph of the great Abenomic miracle.

I am old enough to remember when one parent could bring home enough to support the other's choice to stay home and raise their children. I remember that being the norm, and the economy was great, people bought houses and took vacations and spent money.

Now, even if you work in a bank, you need a side hustle. I wonder where all the money went?

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Just pay the emps more.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I am old enough to remember when one parent could bring home enough to support the other's choice to stay home and raise their children. I remember that being the norm, and the economy was great, people bought houses and took vacations and spent money.

If you are talking about life here in Japan, the "one" parent who worked, typically the father, spent nearly 2/3rds of his life at work, or at least, at work and travelling between work and his "home", spend little time with his family.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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