Japanese "unagi" (eel) cuisine. Photo: WikiCommons/Naotakem from Yurakucho, Tokyo
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Smuggled European eels farmed in China to meet Japan's strong demand

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Time to get a new tradition Japan.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

No farm, no howl...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I like eating eel as well, but farming from China. I would be very concern about industrial strength chemicals that might present in it. Best to avoid.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I dont know why people are pointing fingers at Japan. Spanish and Chinese are the ones breaking the law. Anyway, most Japanese will only eat Japanese eels not cheap imported eels. I have eaten Japanese eel already THREE times this summer, with my family. Unagi-don. It was very delicious.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I dont know why people are pointing fingers at Japan. 

I see nothing to suggest that anybody is pointing fingers at Japan.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Chinese farmed eel is one of the most contaminated food products one could eat.. It's at the bottom of the Chinese food safety ladder. And, that ladder doesn't go too high to begin with.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

If you want to trace where something like eels being, demand some blockchain tracking with each stop along the way adding to the chain with their secured key. Then let consumers validate the chain of custody.

Crypto-currencies aren't the best use of blockchain tech. Logistics tracking is.

BTW, if demand dries up in Japan, then supply will be reduced and the criminals will have to find new ways to make money. Same for illegal drugs.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I dont know why people are pointing fingers at Japan. Spanish and Chinese are the ones breaking the law. Anyway, most Japanese will only eat Japanese eels not cheap imported eels.

Its not us, we’re the good guys I swear! Not really pointing fingers, just pointing out the obvious. Supply and demand is big enough for Japan not care where it comes from. I reckon “most” Japanese people don’t know where the eels they ate come from. If it was the case, and Japanese eels were mostly eaten then there wouldn’t be a need for importing them. The article clearly stated that’s the demand is there for consumers to not really care where it is coming from.

A large quantity of young European eels smuggled to China is raised in the country for about half a year before being shipped to the Japanese market, particularly when demand for the snake-like fish peaks every summer, according to a senior Spanish police officer.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

expat.... wunnnderful! (⌒▽⌒)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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