American candy giant Mars Wrigley has insisted it "respects China's national sovereignty" and apologised after an advert for its Snickers bar referred to Taiwan as a country Photo: AFP/File
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Snickers owner apologizes after referring to Taiwan as a country

47 Comments

American candy giant Mars Wrigley has insisted it "respects China's national sovereignty" and apologized after an advert for its Snickers bar referred to Taiwan as a country, sparking outrage on the mainland.

Screenshots of marketing for the nutty confectionery featuring the South Korean boyband BTS were swiftly picked up on social media in mainland China, where any suggestion the island is an independent nation is highly taboo.

"We are aware of reports on Snickers-related activities in certain regions of Asia, take this very seriously and express our deep apologies," said a Mars Wrigley statement posted Friday on Snickers China's Weibo page.

The company has asked Snickers' local team to check and adjust its official website and social media account "to ensure the company's publicity content is accurate", it added.

"Mars Wrigley respects China's national sovereignty and territorial integrity, and conducts business operations in strict compliance with local Chinese laws and regulations," the statement said.

Hours after the first statement, Snickers China shared another Weibo post adding that "there is only one China in this world, and Taiwan is an inalienable part of China's territory".

Beijing reacted with fury this week when US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi defied its warnings and visited Taiwan -- which China claims as part of its territory and has vowed to take, by force if necessary.

China said Friday it was ending cooperation with the United States on key issues including climate change, and has in recent days encircled the self-ruled democratic island with a series of military drills.

Mars Wrigley is far from the first international firm to issue an apology over worries of losing access to China's massive consumer market.

In 2019, French luxury brand Dior apologized after using a map of China in a presentation that did not include Taiwan.

Hotel chain Marriott's website in China was shut down by authorities for a week in 2018 after a customer questionnaire listed Taiwan, Tibet and Hong Kong as separate countries.

© 2022 AFP

©2022 GPlusMedia Inc.

47 Comments
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Oh FFS!

21 ( +21 / -0 )

When a chocolate bar is a threat to national security, might want to raise the bar on threat levels.

24 ( +24 / -0 )

An American company apologizing to China? Beyond weird!

21 ( +21 / -0 )

Grow a pair!!

24 ( +24 / -0 )

It’s because Snickers has a plant in China. All Japanese Snickers are from China. They were one of my favorites but I don’t trust the sourcing of ingredients.

12 ( +15 / -3 )

Formerly colonising European countries like England, Spain, France, The Netherlands etc. gained respect by reversing course, withdrawing and granting independence. Conversely, the CCP is gaining hatred by bullying and promoting expansion.

If the CCP wants respect they should graciously leave the Taiwanese alone.

17 ( +18 / -1 )

I bet you this same company was oh so pro Ukraine back in February, but they are not only cool, but apologize for not promoting the fantasy created by China that is nothing more than gaslighting to justify their actions if they ever try to take control of the independent and sovereign country of the Republic of China (Taiwan).

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Do they still advertise that "Snickers really satisfies?" Seems like someone got indigestion.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Oh dear...

Next step, travel guidebooks apologizing for mentioning "Taiwanese Cuisine", "Taiwanese Culture" or even "Taiwan" in their travel guides on...Taiwan...

12 ( +12 / -0 )

All the more reason to buy some!!!

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

New Snickers- now without nuts.

15 ( +15 / -0 )

All the more reason to buy some!!!

you’re out of luck, buddy. If you live in Japan, that is. No original Snickers here; Just variations of the original one. ;a few months ago, Japan removed Snickers from every Japanese store and stopped importing it; you used to see it everywhere; suupaa, combini, etc., but now it’s nowhere to be seen. Not sure about the reason; heard they found “something” inside… or is it something else. I used to buy it weekly… Snickers and cheese is one of my favorite combinations… … oh well.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Bring instead some Mars and Bounty to the stores. I miss them so much. Snickers I don’t like so much, no problem if they are completely taken from the shelves.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

funkymofo

New Snickers- now without nuts

My favourite comment of the day!

Wholly agree with the sentiment.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

guess its time to stop eating any garage from that company, sad man, you just had to back down

4 ( +4 / -0 )

What a wimp! I'm not snickering!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

No more Snickers or other related food from this company. This company is weak and low.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

fizzbit:

It’s because Snickers has a plant in China. All Japanese Snickers are from China. They were one of my favorites but I don’t trust the sourcing of ingredients.

Well, ask Snickers to source their milk from Meg Milk (Snow Brand) then. I'm sure their milk is fresh.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Too much to bear for mainland China internet users again? Nah, I don't believe you...

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Have those outraged Internet users complained and posted when they got evicted from their own apartments to be converted into Covid quarantine zones, their people starved to death?

Their small kids separated from their parents and thrown into whatever room. Their families thrown into empty rooms with no water services like detention camps because "Covid prevention."

Have they complained about those arrested for speaking their frustrations publicly during lockdowns, or bout students locked in Beijing University dorms?

Didn't think so.

Pussies.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I wonder if Nancy Pelosi has a comment about this.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

you used to see it everywhere; suupaa, combini, etc., but 

“ conbini/konbini “ … excuse me.

Bring instead some Mars and Bounty to the stores.

Lion would also be nice. :)

“ New Snickers- [ now without nuts. ] “

Indeed.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

rcchToday  10:44 pm JST

“ conbini/konbini “ … excuse me.

Combini was correct too; actually, more accurate spelling.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Weak. No more Snickers for me.

But unfortunately I haven't had one in probably 25 years, so my boycott won't have much impact.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

painkillerToday  11:06 pm JST

Combini was correct too; actually, more accurate spelling.

… there’s the Japanese/katakana way and the English way. … confusing, huh(?) Thank you. :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Apparently Snickers is going with its new product, Nutless Snickers.

They claim it saves one from an allergic reaction to confrontation.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Apparently Snickers is going with its new product, Nutless Snickers. 

They claim it saves one from an allergic reaction to confrontation.

Lmao.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

rcchToday  11:22 pm JST

… there’s the Japanese/katakana way and the English way. … confusing, huh(?) Thank you. :)

Had to look that up.

First (second now) time seeing the *k**onbini *spelling.

And kanpai instead of kampai.

I'm ok with the k there, but the n instead of m is off for me.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Had to look that up.

First (second now) time seeing the *k**onbini *spelling.

And kanpai instead of kampai.

I'm ok with the k there, but the n instead of m is off for me.

The Japanese don’t have/use “c” and The “ ン “ translates into “ n “. ;maybe that’s why the “confusion”. I believe it’s fine whichever way one prefers. No worries. ;)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

First (second now) time seeing the *k**onbini *spelling.

People usually transliterate こ as ko, not co. So spelling it combini is a bastardization of the English spelling of a transliteration of a Japanese word that came from English. However, as there is no official method of transliteration of Japanese to English, it's as accurate as anything.

And kanpai instead of kampai.

Sometimes ん is translated as n, sometimes as m. The actual Japanese pronunciation is basically a combination (not a combini) of both, and therefore while both are not correct insofar as the Japanese pronunciation is concerned, both are valid transliterations into English. It's why ハンバーガー is usually transliterated as hambaagaa rather than hanbaagaa, and ワイン is tranlisterated as wain instead of waim.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

StrangerlandToday  11:54 pm JST

*First (second now) time seeing the *k**onbini spelling.

People usually transliterate こ as ko, not co. So spelling it combini is a bastardization of the English spelling of a transliteration of a Japanese word that came from English. However, as there is no official method of transliteration of Japanese to English, it's as accurate as anything.

And kanpai instead of kampai.

Sometimes ん is translated as n, sometimes as m. The actual Japanese pronunciation is basically a combination (not a combini) of both, and therefore while both are not correct insofar as the Japanese pronunciation is concerned, both are valid transliterations into English. It's why ハンバーガー is usually transliterated as hambaagaa rather than hanbaagaa, and ワイン is tranlisterated as waininstead of waim.

… so it all comes down to personal preferences, right(?) No need for judgments. Thank you for your time. :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

… so it all comes down to personal preferences, right(?) No need for judgments. Thank you for your time. :)

Mostly. As there is no official transliteration, it is personal preference. But if you start transliterating things like コンビニ as convini, it's going to get confusing, so better to stick with the common transliterations at least.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

I love how insecure dictatorships are. They are so easy to troll.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

American candy giant Mars Wrigley has insisted it "respects China's national sovereignty" and apologized after an advert for its Snickers bar referred to Taiwan as a country

No more snickers for me. They cant even tell the truth when faced by China's BS.

Taiwan IS a country. Simple and true. Get over it China.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

The independent and free nation of Taiwan should create a new chocolate bar called Snackers, and sell it around Asia.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Wriggly Co will be in trouble back home over this. It will be like McDonalds was in Russia, before they closed everything. They won't have much choice.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Taiwan IS A COUNTRY.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I agree with many of you, Taiwan is a country. In fact it has its own culture, it's own flag and in most cases it's own rules and regulations. China is just butting in and interfering in Taiwans way of life. China is the thug of Asia.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That's it!!! I am boycotting Mars Wrigley from now on!!!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I still call them marathons, but, in any case, won't be buying any more.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

But if you start transliterating things like コンビニ as convini, it's going to get confusing

Only if the katakana was コンヴィニー, which it isn’t. But we get your point.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

My Taiwanese friends tell me it is a country.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I agree, Taiwan is an island country

China needs to back off…

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Influence of the CCP is clearly obvious here.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Yo ! CCP Dudes - I'm going to stop buying Snickers who clearly support you.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Best educate you Kids over Chocolate Nut bars - not healthy for a Physical growth development like Captain America, and the likes.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

StrangerlandAug. 6  11:54 pm JST

People usually transliterate こ as ko, not co. So spelling it combini is a bastardization of the English spelling of a transliteration of a Japanese word that came from English. However, as there is no official method of transliteration of Japanese to English, it's as accurate as anything.

No one was arguing otherwise.

Sometimes ん is translated as n, sometimes as m. The actual Japanese pronunciation is basically a combination (not a combini) of both, and therefore while both are not correct insofar as the Japanese pronunciation is concerned, both are valid transliterations into English. It's why ハンバーガー is usually transliterated as hambaagaa rather than hanbaagaa,

No one was arguing this point, and it is already understood.

and ワイン is tranlisterated as wain instead of waim.

This is not relevant to the ん+b= m sound for ん.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

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