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Takata refuses to comply with U.S. demand for expanded air bag recall

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By TOM KRISHER and YURI KAGEYAMA

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44 Comments
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Takata is clearly run by idiots!! W T F!!

0 ( +5 / -5 )

This can't be good for business.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Hoo boy, looks like Mama bear at Takata is cruisin' for a bruisin'

This could prove to be more entertaining than the clown show elections!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Bring it on!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

It sounds like this company doesn't have a clue about the media and how to get its message across.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I heard Takata dominates global airbag production. Seeing as it's customers are the automakers only, their response probably means they're pretty confident that sales won't be affected too badly, although their share price will

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"Takata on Tuesday said it had formed a panel..."

Sorry, Takata, but the Japanese way of forming internal panels to cover things up simply doesn't fly elsewhere.

Anyway, if they don't comply and Congress finds them lacking then I think the solution would be pretty simple: ban all Takada products from vehicles or other goods to be sold in the US. Period. If automakers don't want this because it would increase production costs, pass legislation that makes it mandatory to clearly put in the contract and somewhere visible on the product that the purchaser may die due to the presence of a Takada product and the owner bears sole responsibility for said death or any injury.

7 ( +14 / -7 )

You know what they say, play with fire and...!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This American agency seems very confused (and biased, as usual):

http://www.zacks.com/stock/news/155502/general-motors-investigation-for-inadvertent-braking-closed

Nevertheless, the NHTSA investigation has been closed without asking for a recall. However, the NHTSA clarified that closing of the investigation does not imply that any safety issue was not detected by it.

How does this sentence make any sense? I'm not defending Takada, but I can't help to see the double standards of the US towards their own companies and the foreign ones. I also wonder why in GM ignition switches recall, Delphi Automotive PLC wasn't treated like Takada now. http://www.thestreet.com/story/12948081/1/general-motors-gm-stock-falls-amid-ignition-switch-recall-investigation.html

Some people call me "anti-American", when I only see American double standards in the things. Like its rating agencies, that created basically the debt crises in my country, Italy. How can people trust the US, when they see their double standards?

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Wondering whether if the Japanese govt demanded top execs of, say, IBM or Microsoft to show up in Tokyo for hearings into their defective products, would they?

I'm also wondering what - if any - jurisdiction the US govt has over executives of foreign-based companies. 

Any?

Anyone?

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Takata should address the issue across the board.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Um, this is a Japanese company, right? They've made no comment or commitment to addressing faults with their products. So, let's compare with other Japanese companies that have done similar, Kanebo, Sony, Toyota and many more. The companies response is pretty true to form.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Meanwhile, the Americans are becoming poorer and poorer, despite the numbers of the GDP.

This article is in Italian, anyway it's about how the middle class isn't able to spend anymore:

http://www.ilsole24ore.com/art/notizie/2014-12-02/festa-ringraziamento-crollano-consumi-11percento-middle-class-non-spende-piu-222453.shtml?uuid=AB7nMCLC

The US try to solve the crises that they created by themselves abusing of their power against foreign companies and other states, in all the ways and forms possible. If you are American, not being surprised if many people around the world dislike your government.

-6 ( +5 / -10 )

"Like its rating agencies, that created basically the debt crises in my country, Italy."

Of course. US rating agencies caused Italy's debt crisis! The fact Italy chose to adopt the euro and then chose to spend more than it earned, forcing the Germans to come to your rescie (just like world war 2, LOL,) had nothing to do with it.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

forcing the Germans to come to your rescie

The Germans are not helping us at all. Italy has always had high debt, but we were able to deal with it. Plus, Italian families have always had high level of savings, not tons of debts like American familes. The debt crises started because of financial speculation, when the rating agencies declassed Italy suddenly speaking about "default", but we weren't in such kind of situation. And now, our debt, after austerity imposed by German-centric Europe, is worse than before. Now, also Germany economy is starting to be hurt by the global situation.

-2 ( +5 / -6 )

I have to give credit to GW for summing up the problem. I hope the authorities in Abe's camp do something about this, as it is obviously not good for Japan's image abroad. I'd like to see a big response from the general population demanding a seriously corrective action on the part of Takata.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

as it is obviously not good for Japan's image abroad.

It could be not good for the US image abroad, according to the point of views.

-8 ( +2 / -9 )

This American agency seems very confused (and biased, as usual):

Alex -- did you really read the whole article? If you had, you would have seen this:

Takata has yet to pinpoint a cause, even though the recalls started a decade ago.

Takata cannot explain why this is happening and has known about the danger for over ten years -- but is stonewalling a wider recall. Sorry, but that is hardly "confused" or "biased" on the U.S. NHTSA. The confusion and bias is clearly with Takata -- and they want to willingly put additional U.S. lives at risk as a result.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Sorry, but that is hardly "confused" or "biased" on the U.S. NHTSA.

The U.S. NHTSA attitude is confused and biased in general, how I showed in the articles that I linked.

Tell me, why Delphi Automotive PLC isn't getting the same treatment? Again, I don't trust USA, since Iraq war in 2003. That is when the US lost any credibility. It was a war based on lies and nobody was punished fort this. Nobody. Abuse of power, this is the US. The US image in the world has been completely ruined, there's nothing you can do to improve it anymore.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

"In Tokyo, Takata spokesman Hideyuki Matsumoto said the company’s response to NHTSA was “neither a yes nor a no.” Takata agreed to cooperate with the automakers on whatever they decide, he said."

Neither a yes or a now, how very Japanese of him I hope they get burned by the US gov, they need a lesson.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Looks like Takata might be setting the stage for a US withdrawal. The next stage sould be manufacturers applying pressure to the company by buying elsewhere.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

More like Japanese arrogance. Manufacture a product that gets US citiizens killed then play mickey mouse games.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Manufacture a product that gets US citiizens killed then play mickey mouse games.

Americans killed tons of people in Iraq because of LIES but nobody has been punished. Oh, well, they were "only" Iraq people, not precious US citizens.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Safety first, above all else. NHTSA should push Takata over this, like they did GM for the massive recalls.

Who cares what Alex80 think; it's not his life that depends on this - it's other people's. Safety first saves lives. Politics shouldn't trump safety.

When the airbag recall would save lives, then do it.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@Alex Your point about the war is well taken, but thats a different, unrelated issue. Japanese have every access they could ever want to the US and other markets, but use protectionism to close their own. Now there have been fatalities, and they are playing hide and seek.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Takata really doesn't understand the US legal system. I wonder who their lawyers are? They are setting themselves up for serious problems as automakers will start to drop them in response to the liability pressure. The pics of blood spattered airbags will really get a jury on the prosecutions side and the costs will mount.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Safety first, above all else.

Honesty first, above all else.

NHTSA should push Takata over this, like they did GM for the massive recalls.

GM isn't getting the same hard treatment, and later it will be saved by the government anyway. What about Delphi Automotive PLC?

Who cares what Alex80 think

Yeah, and who cares what your average American people think, when criminal acts like Iraq war are A FACT for all the world, at this point.

-6 ( +4 / -9 )

Safety first, above all else.

Honesty first, above all else.

No. Safety. An honest dictator still won't save lives.

NHTSA should push Takata over this, like they did GM for the massive recalls.

GM isn't getting the same hard treatment

Yes, GM did. That's why GM had to recall 13 million cars in the US the last year - that's more cars than they've sold in the US in the last decade!

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I hope they drop the Takata brand and start to manufacture their own air bag systems instead of buying from Japan. The US gov can sue them or whatever, but the ultimate lesson for these Japanese companys who enjoy unlimited access to US and other markets would be to manufacture and buy from domestics.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

No. Safety. An honest dictator still won't save lives.

But you can't say if there's a real problem of safety when there's not honesty. And here, it's not clear how honest is the US agency, because of the biased attitude. This is my point.

Yes, GM did. That's why GM had to recall 13 million cars in the US the last year - that's more cars than they've sold in the US in the last decade!

Are you sure the recalls were enough? You can't know it. And which is the point, when the government can help them anyway, later? It already happened.

And that's still not a reason to sacrifice people's lives over a bad airbag.

I'm not saying this. But I doubt honesty of this agency because of its double standards (again, read the articles I linked!).

-1 ( +5 / -5 )

Takata’s response to the call come from the U.S. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration seems to be ignorant, and irresponsible not to mention arrogance.

Here is the thing: from the very beginning of whole episode, Takata has been apparently “embarking” a self-destructive route from the early stage of confusion then concealment to current pivotal point of evading responsibility. Putting all of these nonsenses together, American general public would perceive Takata’s actions and its products as something that are endangering people’s lives.

There is one thing that may be worth to bring out. Takata’s CEO, Mr.Shigehisa Takada and his mother Ms. Akiko Takada ( who has significant influence in the company) are wrestling the control when it comes to the decisions of handing the fallout.

Certainly, it’s early to project how the final outcome will be, nevertheless, it doesn’t look good for Takata at this point.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

@Ethan Nothing new here, we saw the same behavior during the Fukushima meltdown. Confusion, stalling,and blaming. Months of daily data updates on TV that suddenly ended. I never figured that one out either.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Alex80: "And here, it's not clear how honest is the US agency, because of the biased attitude. This is my point."

How can you HONESTLY say this given your very, very clear bias about the US? And suggesting Takada puts honesty first? hahaha... laugh of the day, I tell you! And if all of this is 'so obviously' a result of American dishonesty, why have more than 2.14 million cars in Japan been recalled (despite posters like StormR saying it's only happening in the US and Mexico)?

"Why should I trust US system more than Japan system?"

No one is saying you should. But clearly you don't automatically trust Takada, given the proof that they have been negligent about the whole thing to say the least, because of your bias towards the US (which makes it all the more funny chiding American bias!).

"Nice question"

No. It was a rather sad question, really, and another sad attempt at deflection and further indication you are obsessed.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

@5petals "Nothing new here, we saw the same behavior during the Fukushima meltdown. Confusion, stalling,and blaming. Months of daily data updates on TV that suddenly ended. I never figured that one out either."

You have very valid point. Japanese way to deal with less rosy stories including its war time past does show a consistent pattern, unfortunately.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

I totally agree with Alex80, not surprised why he is being criticized neither...

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's quite rational to defer the recalls to the car manufacturers - they have the customer relationships (through the relevant VINs) and the workshops, after all.

Given the need for Takata to ultimately fund all this, surely it's the most cost effective - thus feasible - option?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@5petals "Nothing new here, we saw the same behavior during the Fukushima meltdown. Confusion, stalling,and blaming. Months of daily data updates on TV that suddenly ended. I never figured that one out either."

EthanWilber: You have very valid point. Japanese way to deal with less rosy stories including its war time past does show a consistent pattern, unfortunately.

You took the words right out of my mouth.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Takata doesn't need to comply to the US demand, those senators are prejudice and discriminate against Asian, see what happened to Toyota as you can see the parts were made in USA no qualities, the one that was made in Japan has no problems, when GM have problems with the ignition switch they keep their mouth shut and didn't ask the GM's executive to come forward to explain the problems and those GM knew about the problems for years and try to ignore it and when the consumers start complained and certain numbers of drivers or passengers were killed in the car crashed then they start doing the recall as for those Senator the didn't say anything but they fined them for so amount of money which is half what the Toyota paid for the fine. anyway those GM does not made good car how many consumers buy cars from them only the Government, State and City bought it, it is mandatory because it is help them from Bankrupt. the only cars they sell the most is Pickup truck. It is just politic and we know politic has never been fair.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

This American agency seems very confused (and biased, as usual):

Unlike Alex who isn't biased at ALL. (rolls eyes)

http://www.zacks.com/stock/news/155502/general-motors-investigation-for-inadvertent-braking-closed

Nevertheless, the NHTSA investigation has been closed without asking for a recall. However, the NHTSA clarified that closing of the investigation does not imply that any safety issue was not detected by it.

How does this sentence make any sense?

Allow me to explain it in terms you can understand. I'll try and keep it to small words: The NHTSA investigation mentioned in the article you cite had nothing to do with the ignition switch fiasco (which DID generate a recall and a ton of bad press for GM). The investigation mentioned in the article you cite was in regards to a couple of GM owners claiming the cars were initiating uncommanded braking. The investigation determined that the "uncommanded" braking was actually caused by the owners accidentally turning on the electronic parking brake. Until the NHTSA obtains legal authority to recall moronic owner's brains, this investigation cannot activate a recall. Therefore, they closed the investigation without a recall. They are only legally able to report on the subject of their investigation, so they added the disclaimer that just because the issue of the uncommanded braking was closed, that doesn't mean that other issues weren't found and presented to the manufacturer for resolution.

I'm not defending Takada, but I can't help to see the double standards of the US towards their own companies and the foreign ones.

I suppose if you go in expecting to see double standards, that's exactly what you WILL see.

I also wonder why in GM ignition switches recall, Delphi Automotive PLC wasn't treated like Takada now.

Probably because, unlike Takata airbags that weren't SUPPOSED to shrapnel the passengers when the bags deploy, the ignition key switches manufactured by Delphi were manufactured exactly as designed by GM. Thus, the burden falls on the designer (GM), not the company making what they were told to make (Delphi). This is just a guess, but I'd say Toyota, Honda, GM, and Chrysler didn't include in their airbag specifications to Takata a minimum amount of shrapnel to be ejected into the heads of the passengers along with airbag deployment.

Some people call me "anti-American", when I only see American double standards in the things. Like its rating agencies, that created basically the debt crises in my country, Italy. How can people trust the US, when they see their double standards?

Again, you went in expecting double standards even though none exist, and that's why that's all you see. You need to go back to school and take a course or two in macroeconomics because you obviously don't understand a thing about a macroeconomy. Rating agencies don't initiate debt crises, they react to them - sometimes making them worse. The rating agencies didn't put Italy into a debt crisis - ITALY put Italy into a debt crisis and the ratings agencies simply responded to the extremely poor debt choices being made by lowering the country's credit rating. As for double standards, you DO know that Moody's lowered the U.S. credit rating during the "sequestration", right? that pretty much makes a mockery of your "double standards" delusion.

Takata doesn't need to comply to the US demand

True, but they'll never do business in the United States again if they don't comply. They also face the possibility of stiff fines for non-compliance - fines that can be internationally applied through international channels even IF Takata bails out of the U.S.:

NHTSA Deputy Administrator David J. Friedman, in testimony prepared for a House committee hearing Wednesday, reiterates his intent to force what is mushrooming into one of the largest vehicle recalls in history. He has threatened to seek a $7,000-per-vehicle fine against Takata.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/local/trafficandcommuting/takata-on-a-collision-course-with-federal-regulators-over-nationwide-air-bag-recall/2014/12/02/8e6b8110-79dd-11e4-84d4-7c896b90abdc_story.html

when GM have problems with the ignition switch they keep their mouth shut and didn't ask the GM's executive to come forward to explain the problems

Revisionist history at its finest! Actually, the CEO of GM was called before a Congressional Investigative Committee to explain just how the company thought keeping quiet about the ignition defect was the smart thing to do:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2014_General_Motors_recall#Congressional_testimony

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Arrogant as hell!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Unlike Alex who isn't biased at ALL. (rolls eyes)

Unlike Fadamor who isn't biased at ALL (rolls eyes)

Allow me to explain it in terms you can understand. I'll try and keep it to small words

I'm not an idiot, be polite, thanks.

The NHTSA investigation mentioned in the article you cite had nothing to do with the ignition switch fiasco

I KNOW IT.

The investigation mentioned in the article you cite was in regards to a couple of GM owners claiming the cars were initiating uncommanded braking. The investigation determined that the "uncommanded" braking was actually caused by the owners accidentally turning on the electronic parking brake.

Did you read the whole article?

However, the automaker did find a parking brake software problem in some cars that resulted in the recall of 133,000 cars, including the Chevrolet Impala.

There was a defect, but the agency didn't ask for a recall, GM did it but we can't say if it was enough. Plus:

In related news, the NHTSA also closed an investigation into reports of rusting of the heat shield in some vehicles of Ford Motor Co. (F - Analyst Report) without seeking a recall. According to the complaints, the rusting could dislocate the heat shield and jam the steering shaft. The involved vehicles are 500,000 Ford Crown Victoria, Mercury Grand Marquis and Mercury Marauder vehicles of model years 2004 to 2007.

Also Ford was spared, and there's not any explanation for this "mercy": But no, there are not any double standards!

I suppose if you go in expecting to see double standards, that's exactly what you WILL see.

You are just in denial.

Probably because [...]

Yeah, "probably"...good explanation. "Probably". What about double standards? It's a better explanation.

Again, you went in expecting double standards even though none exist, and that's why that's all you see.

Yeah, sure. Look at "Strage del Cermis" and then tell me if there are not double standards in America.

The rating agencies didn't put Italy into a debt crisis - ITALY put Italy into a debt crisis

I said Italy has always had a chronic high public debt but the debt crisis has been started by the rating agencies that started to speak about Italy default, suddenly, and it was pure nonsense! Are we in default maybe? NO! Even though our economy now is worse than before the market speculation hit my country because of your cute rating agencies.

As for double standards, you DO know that Moody's lowered the U.S. credit rating during the "sequestration", right? that pretty much makes a mockery of your "double standards" delusion.

If there weren't double standards, US credit rating should be way worse! Its rating is a JOKE.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

If there weren't double standards, US credit rating should be way worse! Its rating is a JOKE.

Again I ask -- exactly how is this, and the rest of alex's rants, on topic? I thought the story was about Takata and its air-bag problems.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

So - I've never seen a "Takata" store in the USA.

When dealing with the NTSB, providing the requested answers is the best policy. This company needs to hire an American PR firm quick if they don't want to be banned from selling anything inside the USA again.

Offering to do whatever the car makers wants is a good step, but passing the buck won't work with the NTSB. They need to show up, bring data, answer honestly (which seems to be culturally difficult for many Japanese IME) to the hearings.

That is how Ford, GM, and other companies survive these things - they stop stonewalling, take their lumps, perform the requested follow-up, pay the fines AND solve the root problem.

It isn't like Takata has stores all over the USA - so I don't really understand how a recall can work without the car makers being involved. The NTSB has to be reasonable about these things.

Americans are a highly mobile society, so not doing a nationwide recall just doesn't make sense. Vehicles sold in Detroit are often moved to Alabama, Florida, Texas ...

BTW, I have a 2001 Honda, but it doesn't use the Takata-made airbags. Just had some seat belt buckle warranty work done last month (free) at the dealership. That trivial replacement took over 3 hrs for some reason, even with an appointment. If it wasn't safety (my life and the life of my family) related, I probably would have just removed the stupid warning light rather than getting it fixed.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

"Takata doesn't need to comply to the US demand, those senators are prejudice and discriminate against Asian, see what happened to Toyota as you can see the parts were made in USA no qualities, the one that was made in Japan has no problems"

Japanese arent predjudice towards foriegn made products or people? I dont think the senator is being predjudiced at all, if anything they have took too long to act. If a Toyota part is made in the US and is crap, whos fault is that? I have heard that all their management over there are Japanese, and just like in Japan, let the gaijin run the lines. If they are managing it, shouldnt they be accountable for the QC?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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