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Takata whistleblower says air bag warning was 'ethical duty'

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When I read the headline, I thought this was going to be about a rare Japanese whistleblower, someone who blew the whistle form Japan.

I was wrong.

There is too much company loyalty in Japan and too little whistleblower protection.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

He still waited 15 years and many deaths.

If retired, what retaliation are we talking about ?

It seems like USA versus Japan match.

The only important thing for every world citizen is safety, so he should be honored and get socially rewarded.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Chasing after an ambulance chaser with a fabrication is not 'ethical duty'.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

When I read the headline, I thought this was going to be about a rare Japanese whistleblower, someone who blew the whistle form Japan.

I was wrong.

There is too much company loyalty in Japan and too little whistleblower protection.

Well said. The cover-up would have continued to this day otherwise.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

A very revealing and interesting expose on this whole episode right here:

https://jalopnik.com/the-complete-story-of-takata-airbags-and-the-biggest-re-1780143347

Includes Mark Lillie's initial reaction. Interesting to see that the guy who seems to have been most responsible for the debacle only left Takata in 2015 and is now using the US Fifth Amendment to justify keeping his lips sealed. And all this seems to have happened within the North American arm of Takata... not a word about what the Japanese HQ did about it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Due to lack of consumer safety laws and enforcement in Japan, by default the US has to do it for JP companies operating in the US. Sorry tinawatanabe, in the rest of the world there is a concept of ethical duty.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Meanwhile ethical Subaru, Toyota, Mazda , etc are still using Takata airbags on their new cars.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@Reckless

In the rest of the world there is a concept of ethical duty.

If there really was, there would be few corporate scandals. Whistleblowers highlight failures of ethical duty within a company or organization.

We often see massive breaches of public trust and disregard for the law by companies like VW, with it's emissions cheating, Apple's e-book price fixing cartel, and HSBC's money laundering for drug gangs and terrorist groups. Where whistleblowers are involved at all, they often pay a high price for "betraying" the company.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Meanwhile ethical Subaru, Toyota, Mazda , etc are still using Takata airbags on their new cars.

Didn't US buy Takata technology?  If the money goes to Americans that's OK.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Tina dear, the question is why are these car companies still using da-kine Takata airbags in their cars for sale in Asia but not for USA?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

by default the US has to do it for JP companies operating in the US. 

You should read this news:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-5660517/Ford-ordered-pay-10m-ripping-tens-thousands-customers.html

I guess, due to lack of consumer safety laws and enforcement in the U.S., by default Australia has to do it for American companies operating in Australia. 

Seriously, there are corporate scandals on daily basis involving companies of every nationality, if you didn't notice it.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I find this article very interesting, speaking about this latest Ford scandal, it explains like apparently carmakers never learn by the past scandals:

https://mumbrella.com.au/the-price-of-honesty-for-ford-australia-10-million-514185

In my opinion, the most worrying part is this:

It’s a disturbing commentary on group-think that so many people in Ford must have wondered about the implausibility of the ‘company message’ and remained silent. But what starts as a tiny excuse can grow to become a big fat corporate lie. A quality company like Ford had its reputation needlessly trashed.

A few years ago, Ford Australia’s dishonesty would have been major news, but now that story is competing for media space against the even more monstrous consumer deceptions being exposed at the banking royal commission.

And the Ford deception follows the revelations about the Volkswagen emission scandal.

In other words, these days there are so many and important corporate scandals, compared to the past, that some scandals, despite being very serious, find less space in the press because they are "competing" with also bigger scandals.

For us consumers, life is REALLY complicated.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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