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Teleworking in Japan falls after COVID; hybrid working on rise

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One of the benefits of hybrid work is that it will accommodate the aging population that will need to work beyond age 60. (Fortunately or unfortunately…)

9 ( +12 / -3 )

varies from industry to industry. If it makes life better for companies and employees, why not. It’s one of the lessons from Covid. Trains will still be crowded but a slight bit lesser.

16 ( +16 / -0 )

Bad news. would have hoped that teleworking would have become more mainstream.

One of the benefits of hybrid work is that it will accommodate the aging population that will need to work beyond age 60

absolutely. Another benefit is that people will be able to live in the countryside while working for a company in an urban area. Decongestion in urban centers would decrease. Its also an excellent way to combat climate change, when you don't have billions of people commuting to work every day. The benefits are tremendous.

9 ( +18 / -9 )

Teleworking is the best..

-5 ( +10 / -15 )

The traditional working model is so ingrained into society that it will be difficult to change or modify.

The data shows that teleworking and a shortened work week both increase productivity, promote a healthier work/life balance and reduces the carbon footprint. Seems like a no-brainer that this is the direction all societies should be following. However...

S

5 ( +12 / -7 )

This is Japan. Slow to innovate...

-10 ( +11 / -21 )

One of significant unhealthy aspects of teleworking/remote working is the blurring of the lines between work time and private time. It's psychologically damaging, creating a sense of enslavement. The constantly connected trend increases stress and has detrimental effects on people and their work/private relationships.

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

Being able to help out more with the kids is great. I dont think hybrid working has impacted my productivity negatively, but it has definitely improved my mental health.

14 ( +15 / -1 )

Teleworking is down after Covid?!! Colour me shocked!

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Hervé L'EisaToday  08:34 am JST

One of significant unhealthy aspects of teleworking/remote working is the blurring of the lines between work time and private time. It's psychologically damaging, creating a sense of enslavement. The constantly connected trend increases stress and has detrimental effects on people and their work/private relationships.

This is the main drawback of remote working. Some people like isolation and don’t care about meeting people at the office, but for most people the social part of ”being part of the team” is very important. And no, it’s not efficient to sit around sipping coffee at the office but it is part of the job.

I also enjoyed coffee breaks and lunch with coworkers before, but there’s nobody around anymore. Feels more lonely for sure.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

I've worked in companies and also fully remote, which gave me the impression hybrid is definitely the best way to balance things.

You might think working from home every single day might be a dream come true but reality is you will need to be very focused, especially if you're self employed and your monthly income depends solely on you.

If you have a family and kids, coming to an office even if just for 2, 3 days a week also serves as a escape way, your private, quiet moment when you can afford to be completely silent in your comfy chair for hours.

Rainy monday here in Azabudai Hills and I'm gladly enjoying the quietness I havent had since last wednesday I was here last time.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Japan was very slow and hesitant to start teleworking in general. Heck even less prepared for it in a way that showed the extreme IT gap of the everyday citizen. Basic PC setups with internet and webcams were flying off the shelves during the opening months of covid because so few actually had them compared to the rest of the world.

Now that covid is over the telework boom shows that it definitely can and does work in many fields and honestly is probably the best for certain jobs. No expensive tower offices and services but all the same efficiency if not more so. But many Japanese companies still held their usual stuffy atmosphere like working on camera for 8 hours or criticizing employees for having homes that “don’t fit the work environment “

still imo, telework is a godsend for Japan if only it was truly embraced and not viewed as a stopgap. Workers can be across the country in less crowded places and helping to keep some smaller or suburbs alive. More time with family thanks to no travel time. Company expenses go down since your covering less and so on.

Sadly resistance to the newer trends of working were global and even American companies mostly rejected telework asap.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I have worked hybrid for many years, long before Covid.

I do want the face-to-face interactions with co-workers as it is more productive and efficient.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Japan could do with more remote working to fight centralization and rural decline. None of that is any individual company's fault, but it is what their collective behaviour adds up to.

As a long-time freelancer, it is common sense for me to have a dedicated workspace in the home. However, the vast majority of Japanese newbuilds don't have one. They may have a little desk off the living room or something, designed by someone who doesn't work at home and actually sold as a space where the kids can do their homework and the wife can look up recipes or pay the bills, but that's no good for working at home during the school holidays. Covid threw lots of people in at the deep end with working at home, so I'm not surprised that it was a negative experience for some of them.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

I have worked hybrid for many years, long before Covid.

I do want the face-to-face interactions with co-workers as it is more productive and efficient

I agree,as somone who has veen working hybrid or completely remote for about a decade, working alone has some advantages but so does working with colleagues.

The balance and mix if right is a great benefit to one's working life and income.

I can't stand both working at home alone or at the workplace 5 days a week.

It's necessary to leave the house, meet people and be part of society and also to have the time alone to get some other work done at your home office if you can handle the motivation and focus required.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I don't know about other countries but Covid-19 at Japanese society is not weaned at all. It's just social atmosphere as if "Covid-19 waned" "after Covid" spreading. optimistic atmosphere reduces teleworkers and spread virus.

such Covid-19 deaths by nosocomial infection at care facility in Japan is just tips of iceberg.

https://mainichi.jp/articles/20240424/ddl/k10/040/077000c

-4 ( +1 / -5 )

There are a lot of pro's and con's to work from home. One of my relatives was forced to change job location or face the fact he could be made redundant, but the central office was just over a hours and ten minutes drive each way, so when COVID came along he had no choice to work from home as the office was closed, the amount of money he saved just in fuel each week, ware and tare on the car like tyres, services, depreciation as the car had got a lot of extra Kms on the clock. In the long run he's far better off financially and the extra time he's gained and less stressed ( traffic jams ) . As for me as a contractor it's a lot better, pre COVID 90% of my quotes had to be done after 6.00pm as everyone was at work, but now a lot more people work from home, so we can call around as we're passing during the day, thus saving fuel costs and time..

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Finally it's not what employees want or need, but what the companies want and need, which is workloads effectively done, for own and background investors's profit marges. If this can be reached by remote work in a few rare cases, fine too , then just feel very lucky sitting at the beach resort's hotel bar, slurping expensive cocktails on company's expenses and from time to time moving slowly a finger over the laptop's keyboard, but usually and considering human nature and behaviors, in-office work, mental pressure, supervision and surveillance by the bosses etc, that is the only way it works for most companies. That won't change at all in general or by anything, not by corona or such, not by staff lacking, not by those new life-work balance trends and all such. In short words, your master wants to see with own eyes, that you work hard and that you work for him.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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