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Toyota faces federal, congressional probe in U.S.

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Well I hope they eventually work things out and all the car makers and safety groups learn something out of this. It sounds like there's plenty of blame to go around, no need to scapegoat people. That said, we need to stop the culture of denial in both automakers and regulators.

If people had a clearer picture of facts, they'd be less prone to panic and overreact to problems that admittedly exist among all car makers. Toyota's mistake is a coincidence of multiple problems revealed in a short period of time, and a culture of dismissal of said issues. Some other car makers are only getting by because their cars are inherently less safe, rather than defective. Lucky them. That said, I'd recommend a Honda having owned both brands.

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Toyota's mistake is a coincidence of multiple problems revealed in a short period of time

It's not multiple problems. It's one problem: unintended acceleration. By making people think it's a series of smaller problems Toyota hid the acceleration problem. Now enough time has passed and the problem still persists and people are starting to realize that Toyota has done little to nothing to actually solve it. Now the question is whether or not they knew what they were doing and intentionally mislead people with recalls that they knew wouldn't fix the problem.

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If people had a clearer picture of facts, they'd be less prone to panic and overreact

Exactly. All companies have recalls, thsi particular company tried to operate like they are in Japan by not being forthwright to the public. Can't do that in the US bud... This is what happens.

Had Toyota treated the American cosumers as equals and came out and admited problems with no covering up, this would have been non-news and woudl have blown away by now.

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Some 70% of the acceleration incidents in Toyota’s customer call database involved vehicles that are not subject to the 2009 and 2010 floor mat and “sticky pedal” recalls.

Oh no, the 9 million recalled Toyota cars only represent 30% of the problem. Toyota is crashing, accelerating, into bankruptcy.

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America and Americans have hysterical inclinations.

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Beginning of the end for Toyota, and subsequently Japan Inc. I honestly don't see how the Japanese economy can ever recover, as the only thing they really have going for them is the image of producing quality products to sell abroad. Once that image is tarnished, Japan's exports will decrease significantly.

Times are tough all around, economically speaking. Not a good time to grow complacent, Toyota.

Whether these investigations are bogus or not, they will have the intended effect. Convincing Americans to buy more American products.

If this whole global economic catastrophe (that will likely only get worse, and not better) turns out to see who can have the biggest, self-sustaining economy, not dependent on exports or imports, Japan will surely lose.

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Not looking good. Want to bet Toyota takes on less new recruits next year? Silly buggers tried to save a few dollars and have probably ended up costing thousands of jobs and years of disgust from the American public. Betcha Toyota is now looking for a patsy to dump all this on. Bet he is Japanese and I bet his family will be well looked after.

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japanese companies are the first to drag foreign workers and suppliers over the coals when they dont meet the japanese expectations of 'perfection' .. Toyota should get no sympathy as they knew about this problem and in typical japanese fashion, hoped it would just go away ...

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time to do some serious apologizing, ala Tiger. Tear up a bit, do some community work etc. You can be forgiven by the American public if you can swallow your pride.

I do not think the inferiority-complexed Japanese people are capable of doing that though.

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"by not being forthwright to the public. Can't do that in the US bud... This is what happens."

Horsepuckey. People get hoodwinked by corporations on a daily basis in the U.S. and around the world. Enron. WorldCom. Ford. And these are just the ones you "know" about. This isn't a problem exclusive to Toyota. But Toyota being a Japanese company certainly does explain the extra special Outrage™ Americans are mustering against the company.

"Treated as equals..." Jeez . . . You can practically hear the fifes and snare drums cueing up for a hearty rendition of "Battle Hymn of the Republic."

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ahocchau at 08:36 AM JST - 23rd February

Had Toyota treated the American cosumers as equals and came out and admited problems with no covering up, this would have been non-news and woudl have blown away by now.

True, they should have been completely transparent in their investigations and recalls to begin with. However, I don't believe there was inequality in the treatment of American and Japanese consumers simply because Toyota would have done the same thing if the problem was in Japan.

With that said, it still remains to be seen if they were in fact guilty of a cover-up, or they honestly thought they were addressing the problem. It certainly doesn't look good for them right now.

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Toyota need to find a way to ask the question of whether or not they can expect fair treatment from Congressional hearings when the members they are looking at are not just representing the public’s interest, but GM’s conflict of interest as well. The biggest loser in this will not be Toyota. It sure will be the credibility of U.S. government. The govenment does not have any more room for additonal loss in public trust. But will Govenment treat Toyota fairly when they have much at stake in making it look like they made a wise decision in supporting General Motors?

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Hah, Japanese company complaining about government conflict of interest and market protection. I hope they aren't expecting sympathy...

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sfjp330 -- please, enough with the Congress and GM conspiracy posts. You sound like a broken record. Congress did not create the internal Toyota memo that came to light yesterday bragging about the $100 million or so it saved by avoiding a recall. That was all Toyota's doing, and it would be almost criminal for Congress to not investigate that. Also, the Federal Investigators and the SEC have no reason to favor GM, so if they are looking into Toyota you can believe there is good reason. And, LFRA, your implied-racism post is simply foolish -- because it ignores the fact that millions of Americans have bought Toyota's, Honda's, Nissan's, Mazda's, etc over the years. In fact, Americans have pretty much made those companies what they are today. Also, recent sales figures show Nissan and Honda are gaining as much or more as the American car companies are from Toyota's problems. Nice try, but no cigar.

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herefornow at 09:48 AM JST - 23rd FebruaryCongress did not create the internal Toyota memo that came to light yesterday bragging about the $100 million or so it saved by avoiding a recall.

Who released this propanganda before the Congressional hearing? Govenment Motors?

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If the government is going to have any credibility in regulating the auto industry, it needs to get out of the auto industry. We are now supposed to believe, then, that the Obama administrations only interest in sticking it to Toyota is to protect US consumers from an alleged defect that has yet to be fully proven? Even after the UAW donated millions to The One’s campaign? Even though the government has a major stake in GM? Even when the president’s Transportation Secretary, Ray LaHood, brags about how they went to Toyota’s headquarters in Japan to “wake them up?”Even after Lahood smears Toyota as “safety deaf” and threatens that they’re “not done with Toyota?”

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Wow, that sounds like the kind of stuff the Japanese would pull with importers here!!

Oh, and that memo was released by Toyota...

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Great that's what we need more goverment

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Junnama at 10:41 AM JST - 23rd February Oh, and that memo was released by Toyota...

Get your facts right. The release comes a day before the hearing by the House Energy and Commerce's investigations subcommittee, which is headed by Stupak. The committee has received 75,000 documents from Toyota, including 20,000 in Japanese.

A separate HOUSE COMMITTEE (U.S. CONGRESS REP.) released documents Sunday showing that Toyota's U.S. staff believed it saved $100 million by limiting a 2007 recall of floor mats.

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sfjp330 -- sorry, but WRONG. The Detroit News first reported about this presentation where Toyota took great glee in recounting all the money it had saved by compromising the safety of their vehicles/delaying recalls. But, so what if the Congressional committee released it. It doesn't change the facts. You are trying the old Bush-Cheney tactic of attacking the source, rather than addressing the issue. And, you are obviously clueless as to how the U.S. works. There are just as many folks putting pressure on LaHood to go easy on Toyota, since they employ a lot of folks, as there are those who want him to be aggressive. In fact, several papers have listed all the NHTSA folks with strong ties to Toyota. You need to read before you rant.

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herefornow at 11:18 AM JST - 23rd February But, so what if the Congressional committee released it. It doesn't change the facts.

For many, these documents will be shocking, but as with the rest of Toyota’s fall from grace, the only surprises come from Toyota’s unrealistically clean image going into the scandal. The fact that Toyota lobbies congress to limit the costs of its recalls and other regulation should be no more shocking than the fact that it allowed its defining commitment to quality to slide. But because Toyota has already fallen from grace in the public eye, it’s vulnerable to all kinds of attacks. And because it antagonized lawmakers in the documents it handed over pre-hearing, congress will have no problem wallowing in the dirty details of how Toyota behaves like every other automaker. After all, dressing down a multinational corporation is a lot more rewarding than laying into the bureaucrats at NHTSA, who have the direct responsibility of protecting Americans.

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"The investigations raised the possibility of hefty fines for the automaker or possible indictments against executives in the United States or even in Japan. The latter would require executives to be extradited to the U.S. to face trial."

I have mentioned this before on many occassions- The actions by Toyota executives has been downright criminal ! Americans have been injured and killed and these low lifes did nothing but count their profits ! This is 10x's worse than Enron- nobody got killed there !

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Looks like Congress is trying to destroy Toyota to protect GM, the company they own. What they don't realize is that Toyota isn't going anywhere, and any customers they lose will just go to Honda or Hyundai or Ford, and the other Japanese companies.

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Branded is right. The government is there to protect citizens from danger, war or other. The fact that a car maker made faulty products that were killing people and hid the fault, and then tried to cover it up and not come clean is exactly why the government is there. To investigate these things.

I don't care who released the memo, I care that someone in TOYOTA WROTE IT IN THE FIRST PLACE.

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What they don't realize is that Toyota isn't going anywhere, and any customers they lose will just go to Honda or Hyundai or Ford, and the other Japanese companies.

Realize this, Honda is the only other Japanese company, Hyundai is Korean, and Ford is American. Toyota is going to go bankrupt, first class, like JAL. Toyota never should have tried to fool the world, with their defective cars.

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MrUSA-

"What they don't realize is that Toyota isn't going anywhere, and any customers they lose will just go to Honda or Hyundai or Ford, and the other Japanese companies."

Not according to many of the latest sales figures. The big winners in the Toyota debacle in the US continue to be GM, Ford, and surprise surprise- Chevy !

You are partially right though- Toyota isn't going anywhere- their executives may be though- off to the big house for a few years.

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This ties in nicely with earlier reports of Toyota’s employment of former federal regulators to negotiate such recalls with NHTSA. The implication of course, is that Toyota pressured NHTSA to let it get away with a 55,000 unit floormat recall, thus saving $100 million, when in fact sticky pedals, or some other unexplained problem caused unintended acceleration.

Ultimately, the whole question comes back to quality. It’s unrealistic to assume that the largest automaker in America would not lobby the NHTSA to limit its recall costs, and given the ephemeral nature of sudden, unintended acceleration, it’s not wildly surprising that the NHTSA was satisfied with the floormat explanation, even though they were warned as early as 2004. And though certain government-backed automakers and others are doubtless eagerly anticipating a shllacking of Toyota by posturing representatives, they should probably think twice before raising the safety first rhetoric to a fever pitch and goading congress into beefing up the NHTSA’s investigative capabilities. After all, quality and cost are the fundamental balance of the auto industry, and it doesn’t take much for any automaker to find itself suddenly on the wrong side of the line. Unless automakers are done lobbying altogether and they’re not) there’s not a lot to be gained by the industry as a whole by fanning the flames of what is turning into an almost personal confrontation.

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I think this guy know more than any of us on the subject:

said John Heitmann , a University of Dayton professor who specializes in automotive history. "This won't kill Toyota , but it will level them to a playing field they're not used to: Being just another car company like everyone else."

Toyota, ANA.. I think the time has come for Japanese companies to respect their customers instead of being "symbols of Japan"

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JAL, not ANA.

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Glad I don't own a Toyota.

Toyota have only themselves to blame for this whole mess. That's what happen when a company becomes too big.

People who will not be buying Toyota are: 1)Those who hate Toyota. 2) Those who had a bad experience with Toyota/Dealership. 3)Those who hate Toyota because of the recall.

People who will give Toyota a second chance are those who have great experience with Toyota, and know Toyota is not perfect.

For the past decade Toyota have lost focus when it came to making quality cars. Toyoda being the new CEO was about to bring new changes to Toyota.

When it comes to buying a car I just hope I don't get the one with a defect problem regardless if it is a Ford, Toyota, GM, Honda, or Hyundai.

.

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Herefornow,

“You are . . . attacking the source, rather than addressing the issue. And, you are obviously clueless . . . “

You might want to practice what you preach when you presume to lecture someone on attacking the source.

"The Detroit News first reported about this presentation where Toyota took great glee in recounting all the money it had saved by compromising the safety of their vehicles/delaying recalls."

This is precisely what I've been talking about all along. Did the Detroit News use the words "took great glee" in its article? Or was that your contribution? Did the Detroit News provide the opinion (or proof for that matter) that Toyota seeking to avoid paying more than was deemed necessary on recalls actually compromised the safety of their cars? Or did you add that interpretive color commentary?

Everything about the way this situation with Toyota has been handled politically and in the American media has been drowning in a “Hah! I told you those Japanese devils couldn’t be trusted” subtext that would be impossible to ignore for anyone other than those taking part with gleee in the unless one were taking part in the free-for-all.

In the meantime, while there is this almost rabid desire to make an example of Toyota over this mess, no one seems the least bit concerned that it was the NHTSA that essentially allowed Toyota to avoid addressing the sensor accelerator problem with any degree of urgency, despite receiving third-party warnings from State Farm Insurance.

Doesn't this bother anyone? What Americans should be asking right now is if the NHTSA -- and by extension the Department of Transportation -- was so obviously willing to give a Japanese manufacturer what essentially amounted to a free pass on safety issues with their vehicles, what problems has the NHTSA chosen to “rolls its eyes over" or "laugh at” with American manufacturers?

NOT that I expect anyone to feel even the slightest bit of alarm over what amounts to blatant incompetence, at best, and flagrant corruption, at worst, in our transportation safety regulatory body. After all, we’ve all got Toyota right where we want it now, right?

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LFRAgain relax. This is not a conspiracy against a Japanese company. It is payback to a company that hid mistakes in its products that were killing people, and that company happens to be Japanese.

NHTSA was paid off to look the other way. That certainly won't happen again after this, thanks to Toyota.

Toyota is now "just another car maker" (as a car maker expert said) thanks to their own fault and bloated ago.

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"It’s unrealistic to assume that the largest automaker in America would not lobby the NHTSA to limit its recall costs"

Not when a few months later a family of four is killed in one of these "profits over consumer safety" death traps. I'd like to see each of these congressional hearings begin with 34 seconds of silence in honor of those people who have been innocently killed in these Toyotas. I would also like to see;

"CHP Officer Mark Saylor, 45; his wife, Cleofe, 45; his daughter, Mahala, 13; and his brother-in-law, Chris Lastrella, 38," all of whom were killed in the Aug. 28 crash in Santee given some kind of medals of recognition. Just to remind you-

"Police said someone in the 2009 Lexus ES 350 called 911 just after 6:30 p.m. to report that the car's accelerator was stuck."

"Witnesses say the Lexus was going about 100 mph on northbound state Route 125 when it slammed into the rear of a Ford Explorer, plowed over a curb and went through a fence before hitting an embankment and going airborne."

"The Lexus reportedly rolled several times before bursting into flames in the San Diego River Basin."

If it wasn't for this cell phone call in the middle of complete panic- Toyota would probably still be out there making products that kill and interfering with any and all safety related investigations.

These people deserve medals for their heroism and all the lives they've helped save since the 8.5 million Toyota recall ! And to think there were posters right here at Japantoday that criticised the driver of this vehicle for not knowing how to shut the vehicle down- some shameful comments indeed. 6 months later, here we are, with Toyota getting grilled and facing some serious charges as a corporation and as individuals. Lets hope justice is served and American streets are once again safe to drive on- I say throw the book at these bums !

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"no one seems the least bit concerned that it was the NHTSA that essentially allowed Toyota to avoid addressing the sensor accelerator problem with any degree of urgency, despite receiving third-party warnings from State Farm Insurance"

"No one seems concerned" ? Hardly ! The US media is awash in the story ! How on earth could former NHTSA employees get hired by Toyota- only to turn around and convince their old employee that there were no concerns over Toyota autos ? This has "money changing hands" written all over it and many of us can't wait for the gory details ! This is reeks of scandal and corruption of the first degree- and many wonder how high up it goes !

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American Police do not use all those card board boxes so what are they planning to do? Maybe the Toyota chief will fly in with a whole bunch of them and some blue tarps.

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As posted before, Toyota and Pres. Toyoda better take "extreme caution" when dealing w/ the US Govt. on these problems. The Obama Administration is looking at red lights across the board economically, and emotions run high and tolerance levels zero. Look at unemployment figures for Detroit alone. RED LIGHTS ACROSS THE BOARD.

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"The US media is awash in the story !"

I just now visited MSNBC, Fox News, CNN, ABC News, and CBS News. Not a single, solitary story whatsoever on the front pages of any of those websites regarding the NHTSA's role in allowing Toyota to be lax in its safety procedures. Your definition of "awash" might need a bit of fine-tuning.

"It is payback . . . "

"Lets hope justice is served and American streets are once again safe to drive on- I say throw the book at these bums !"

Glory! Glory! Hallelujah! Glory! Glory! Hallelujah!Glory! Glory! Hallelujah! His truth is marching ooooooon!!

Meanwhile, a voice of reason in all of this from Daniel Farber, Editor in chief at CBS News.com.

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I could advise Toyota like before, like w/ the Prius, but I would get "hammered" - I would need more than a "thank you".

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The big winners in the Toyota debacle in the US continue to be GM, Ford, and surprise surprise- Chevy !

Once again proving this is a big conflict of interest.

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These people deserve medals for their heroism and all the lives they've helped save since the 8.5 million Toyota recall !

Unfortunately, they didn't have to die to have brought attention to the defective pedal. If the driver knew how to kill the engine, they would have been able to testify against Toyota.

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Once again proving this is a big conflict of interest.

So the US should stop regulating its markets?

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So the US should stop regulating its markets?

The US government should not be in the car business. As long as it owns two car companies, it is a conflict of interest to regulate the car industry.

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The US government should not be in the car business. As long as it owns two car companies, it is a conflict of interest to regulate the car industry.

Well, government interference and protection in the auto market is acceptable in Japan. Why can't the playing field be level?

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Well, government interference and protection in the auto market is acceptable in Japan. Why can't the playing field be level?

We Americans shouldn't act like that. "They do this so it's ok if we do it too." We're a free market society so our government should not be purchasing failing companies with our tax dollars. I know you want to make this a Japan VS USA topic, but if the government were to criticize Ford, Hyundai, or BMW, it would still be a conflict of interest.

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I know you want to make this a Japan VS USA topic

Because it's reality. The world doesn't stop at the US's shores. If Japan favors its auto industry at the expense of US automakers that affects the US market. That is fundamental economics - you can't seperate the two markets.

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If Japan favors its auto industry at the expense of US automakers that affects the US market.

That is a very vague statement, so I don't know what you're referring to. Japanese people don't buy American cars because of the inferior quality. They have no problem buying luxury German cars, however. But the Japanese government is not in the business of buying car companies. The US government is and favors its companies over any foreign company and the only other American company, Ford. As long as the government owns and operates car companies, they are in no position to fairly the car industry. Luckily for Ford, they have been doing quite well recently. But if they have a recall anytime soon, the Obama administration will have no problem throwing them under the bus too.

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^Meant to say: "they are in no position to fairly regulate the car industry."

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That is a very vague statement, so I don't know what you're referring to.

Obviously not. An economics course or two might help. This is 102: Protected markets charge higher prices to their customers due to lack of competition - the company makes more money in the home market so it can afford to charge lower prices in the foreign market. Which undercuts companies competing without that unfair advantage. In manufacturing this type of advantage is decisive because volume and cost are key to profits.

Japanese people don't buy American cars because of the inferior quality.

We don't know that for sure since US imports are generally hit with a 100% price markup. In markets where there is no protection issue Toyota, Honda, GM, Ford, VW, BMW are all very competitive with each other. If there is such a quality issue why is this the case??

Let's get down to the simplest of all statements: if Toyota is such a great company why does it need a protected home market??

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Obviously not. An economics course or two might help.

Thanks professor. But what I was looking for was specific examples of Japan "favoring" its industry. So far you've shown me none. "The Japanese do it, so we can do it too!" is not a valid argument. The US government is involved in a conflict of interest, plain and simple. The Japanese government does not (a) own car companies or (b) attempt to destroy the reputations of American car companies. Clearly, the US government is in the wrong.

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But what I was looking for was specific examples of Japan "favoring" its industry

We don't know that for sure since US imports are generally hit with a 100% price markup.

Specific enough for you??

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Specific enough for you??

It seems that you don't have any evidence, so I'll stop asking.

When will you address the US government's conflict of interest?

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Here's another couple for you:

U.S. companies or other foreign ‘transplants’ are not allowed to be built in Japan by under Japan’s strict investment laws

Each individual imported car is required to be brought to the Ministry of Transport for two days for inspection before approval for sale

Getting specific enough, since you can't answer the markup question...

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"We don't know that for sure since US imports are generally hit with a 100% price markup."

But still all those Americans keep buying Toyota's!!!! Despite your exaggerated 100% price markup. Yes!!! That's specific enough for me for sure!!

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Or you can just search the JT website for the MoT official who specifically said the Japan Cash for Clunkers plan could NOT be written to benefit foreign cars. Amazing stuff, but hey you're right that's not evidence. LOL

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Despite your exaggerated 100% price markup.

It's not exaggerated. Go check it. The data is publically available..and I'm not talking about Toyota's imported into the US. I'm talking about US cars imported into Japan.

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since you can't answer the markup question...

I've seen no evidence for your accusation, so I can't agree or disagree with it.

So the US should stop regulating its markets?

This was your response to me talking about the conflict of interest, but you have since avoided it. I'll assume you now agree with me on this subject.

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I've seen no evidence for your accusation, so I can't agree or disagree with it.

You mean you're just ignoring it - whatever dude. What you and I say here won't make a bit of difference to Toyota's fate so I don't know what the point of being so obtuse is...

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Imports are 3% of the Japanes market. There ae no imports here that sell well...

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"Imports are 3% of the Japanes market. There ae no imports here that sell well..."

Well, if the Japanese didn't have Toyota, Honda, Nissan, Suzuki. Mitsubishi, Daihatsu, Subaru..etc.......then maybe US cars would stand a chance.

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The price should be similar accounting for shipping. Of course they could set up auto plants in Japan except that is of course forbidden.

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So if Toyota goes bankrupt because of this, will the US government bail them out?

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No but I'm sure the Japanese government will.

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the irony of the criminals in congress chasing after criminals in business, keeps me rolling in the aisles....

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Some of you need to pay attention here, this is some good- and accurate- information.

-"US imports are generally hit with a 100% price markup."

-"U.S. companies or other foreign ‘transplants’ are not allowed to be built in Japan by/under Japan’s strict investment laws"

-"Each individual imported car is required to be brought to the Ministry of Transport for two days for inspection before approval for sale"

-"Japan Cash for Clunkers plan could NOT be written to benefit foreign cars."

Junnama has hit the nail on the head time and time again- but there really is so much more. I have to laugh at those who insinuate that the J government is not itself compromised with Toyota ! The Japanese government is up to their elbows in promoting Toyota overseas while protecting their domestic markets- a lot of what Junnama has posted shows a clear link between government and the private sector. Throw in the constant media blitz against anything built in North America and I'd say the situation reeks of market protection all the way up into the prime ministers office ! Foreign companys have been tossed a bone here in Japan- a mere 3% of the market ! That only hurts the Japanese consumers- who have to pay outlandish prices- even though the dollar yen exchange rate has been in Japans favor for years now ! Sorry, now matter how you slice it- it all leads to market protection and unfair trading practices by the Japanese- Throw in the 8.5 million recalled defective products that have killed and injured hundreds- well, it's time to get to the bottom of Japan Incorporated and it's assault on America. This is not how "friendly" nations treat each other.

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I find it bizarre that the SEC is doing the NHTSA's work.

Bottom line: NHTSA should be looking at these problems and if electrical controls are having issues new standards must be used.

The NHTSA must start doing its' job for the American populace.

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8.5 million recalled defective products that have killed and injured hundreds

The defect has killed less than 10 people. It is alleged that 34 people (not anywhere near hundreds) have died from the defect, but that has yet to be proven. People are innocent until proven guilty, and so are companies.

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"It is alleged that 34 people (not anywhere near hundreds) have died from the defect"

The "hundreds" is obviously in reference to those seriously injured ! And for the final body count- we have all the time in the world to wait don't we- just as long as we get the facts straight so we can put those bodies to rest. Anyone hoping this will go away in the next few months is nuts ! Reopening hundreds of investigations around the world is going to keep this story in the headlines for years !

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Badsey said, Bottom line: NHTSA should be looking at these problems and if electrical controls are having issues new standards must be used. The NHTSA must start doing its' job for the American populace.

The NHTSA couldn't find the problem (s) with Toyota recall because they lack experience and expertise when it came to finding the "unintended acceleration" problem. NHTSA lack of knowledge on the electronic throttle system hinder their investigation. If NHTSA is relying on Toyota to assist them then there will be problems as we have already know. NHTSA need to change their policy and procedure when it comes to recalls. NHTSA and Exponent should be smarter then Toyota engineers.

The Japanese government have a right to look after Japan best interest. The same can be said for U.S. and Europe when it comes to the auto industry.

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Jeez, if you guys could just hear yourselves.

Wanting a level playing field is odd?? Sorry, I don't understand your point of view...

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skipbeat;

"The NHTSA couldn't find the problem (s) with Toyota recall because they lack experience and expertise when it came to finding the "unintended acceleration" problem. NHTSA lack of knowledge on the electronic throttle system hinder their investigation. If NHTSA is relying on Toyota to assist them then there will be problems as we have already know."

Hmm, that's not exactly the story coming off the news wires lately. The NHTSA "didn't" find any problems because the stopped their investigations after frequent visits from Toyota executives- who BTW used to work for the NHTSA ! Toyota isn't "assisting" anyone ! On the contrary they have hindered investigations and hidden data from various government agencys. It is the sole purpose as to why we have the congressional hearings right now- to find out what exactly has happened here !

And Junnama- "Wanting a level playing field is odd?? Sorry, I don't understand your point of view..."

I'll go a step further- Simply wanting cars that go the speed you want and stop when you want is not asking too much !

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It sounds like the US is playing the same dirty trick like they did about 30 years ago with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. Of course to protect Boeing! That sneaky act almost caused Mitsubishi to go bankrupt. Talking about market protection!!!!!

"Simply wanting cars that go the speed you want and stop when you want is not asking too much !"

Well, talking about American cars I can only agree with you, because that's about all they have to offer.

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MrUSA: "So if Toyota goes bankrupt because of this will, the US government bail them out?" Will Japan? Will you? You seem to be more concerned about Toyota's future than most anyone else on here. What will you do to bring Toyota out of bankruptcy if it goes that far?

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Toyota is very lucky. It didn’t get same treatment from America as 2 years ago a Chinese gyoza maker got from Japan for Chinese-made gyoza scandal. In that scandal Chinese gyoza factory was closed in China and many workers lost their job.

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