business

Toyota doubles full-year forecasts as sales recover

11 Comments
By Shingo ITO

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11 Comments
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In uncertain times, people choose quality and reliability.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The car has been the driving factor of the huge levels of pollution that have caused global warming .

I would like to see car sales,not only Toyota falling

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Great cars.

However,after hearing this I hope they don't expect another government handout when times become 'lean' yet again.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Car are one category that should do well in a pandemic. Who wants to use public transport?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Great cars.

Then buy ours. I can't wait to get the two Toyotas we have out of our driveway. Too difficult and too expensive to maintain. Every trip to a mechanic costs $1000 or more. Kludge!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

@Desert Tortoise.

Then buy a Ford ..

Why moan about it on here?

sigh

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I can't wait to get the two Toyotas we have out of our driveway. Too difficult and too expensive to maintain.

You've mentioned this before, but with few details. I think we've all probably had clunkers of one brand or another. What are these cars? In my life, I've owned one Renault, one Daihatsu, one Toyota, one Ford, two Citroens, one Nissan, and two Hondas. All had good and bad points. The Toyota (a boring Corolla) was probably the best in terms of reliability.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

You've mentioned this before, but with few details. I think we've all probably had clunkers of one brand or another. What are these cars? In my life, I've owned one Renault, one Daihatsu, one Toyota, one Ford, two Citroens, one Nissan, and two Hondas. All had good and bad points. The Toyota (a boring Corolla) was probably the best in terms of reliability.

On the 98 Avalon the oil filter is on the side of the engine right above the motor mount and underneath the exhaust manifold. Since the engine must be warm for the oil change removing the filter often results in burns and there is no way to remove the filter without all the oil in it pouring out over the motor mount, running down a channel in the frame and dripping onto the exhaust pipe directly below it. Clean up takes longer than the rest of the oil change. Drain plugs on both Avalons, 98 and 2007 are behind the engine where they are hard to reach unless you have a hoist. On the 2007 replacing the rear spark plugs of the transverse V6 requires removing the wiper arms, wiper motor, the deck they mount to and the entire intake system. 5 1/2 hours for an experienced tech just to change 3 spark plugs. All day job for me. It would be a twenty minute job on my Audi. On the '98 I figured out a way to piece together some wobbly socket extensions and curve them around to get at the rear plugs but I can't get my hand in there on the 2007 to remove the coil caps. The cabin air filters are buried behind the glove boxes of both cars are require considerable dash board disassembly and removal of the center console to replace. So guess what? Once they are out they stay out. No cabin filter any more, too hard to replace. Replacing some of the HVAC system blend door actuators requires complete dash board and center console removal.

So now there is a Ford Transit Connect in the driveway and we are looking for a buyer for the 98 Avalon. Now if I could get my wife to part with the 2007 Tuna Boat ..................

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@Desert Tortoise

You are driving a 22 year old Toyota Avalon and have it up for sale.

How can you call Toyotas unreliable?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

You are driving a 22 year old Toyota Avalon and have it up for sale.

I would actually rather sell the new one and use the money to refurbish the older Avalon. The newer 2007 Avalon is the real maintenance nightmare, and a new Avalon isn't much different mechanically. I thought I was doing myself a favor with the newer car since it has a timing chain and hydraulic lifters, but changing the rear plugs on the new car is as ugly and expensive a job as changing the timing belt on the older car. A brand new Avalon has the exact same problems. Kludge. Can't replace the rear wheel bearings, have to buy a whole new hub on the 2007. Well over a hundred bucks a side where bearings are $25 or so a side. On the 98 you can replace just the bearings. And why does the new style cartridge oil filter have to be underneath the car hiding in a recess? I had a 1954 Plymouth with the exact same kind of cartridge oil filter, actually a much bigger one, but it was located next to the cylinder head where it was easy to replace. I have older German cars that never give me these problems. The Audis have the oil drain plug and oil filter immediately behind the bumper where you can get at them without crawling under the car. Too easy. The plugs are all accessible without removing anything other than the plastic decorative cover on top. Four quarter turn fasteners and it's off. Everything about the Audi is easier to maintain. Same for the new Ford we have. Not a fan of Toyotas.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Thank you for the details, Desert. I won't ask again. :-)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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