business

Boeing's 777X jetliner successfully completes maiden flight

12 Comments
By Tim Hepher

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© (c) Copyright Thomson Reuters 2020.

©2020 GPlusMedia Inc.

12 Comments
Login to comment

It would be nice if the increased fuselage length meant more legroom. But it will actually mean 405 people ahead of me in the queue to get off.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

and who, pray, is forcing you to fly?

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

I've found the 777 line (772/773) to be comfortable. It is probably the plane type I fly on the most. There's 4 more inches across inside due to improvements in the new pressure tube design, while the outside dimensions are unchanged.

The A350 is significantly less expensive, so the only reason a B779 makes sense is when the plane is full and all the seats are needed. The Boeing is much heavier than the Airbus.

Guess another article about the B778 will be coming? They definitely look like a B777 series aircraft. That's a good thing.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The 777 is without a doubt one of the best airplanes ever built, but Airbus gained a lot of ground with the A350. I hope that the 777X will meet all of its performance targets right off the bat. From a pilot's perspective it is a fantastic airplane to fly. Not too shabby as a passenger, either.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I suppose this time they don´t try software gimmicks to avoid pilot training? Did anybody confirm this?

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

> I suppose this time they don´t try software gimmicks to avoid pilot training?

Really? MCAS is not a software gimmick to avoid training. It is a tool to allow the MAX to feel like the previous generations of 737 in order to keep a common type rating. The 777x is a clean sheet design. There is no need for a "software gimmick".

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I suppose this time they don´t try software gimmicks to avoid pilot training?

Nah, they just bought off the FAA, like they did with the 737-max

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

The FAA has pledged to ensure the 777X review is conducted rigorously,

yeah right, that what "Clowns" said about the 737 max. The American certification process is a joke. The FAA will always give a pass to Boeing.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

So? the 737 Max also successfully completed a similar Maiden flight...

I think the Clowns statement is certainly most damaging for Boeing's Commercial Airline manufacturing future... as I for one, have zero confidence in Boeing at present, and do not want to be a Crash test Dummy. I would wager, that Boeing even have some small print nowadays in their Contract with their Airlines buying their Aircraft that simply limits their financial loss in the case of a crash.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

@DaveAllTogether - Sorry, I don't buy it.... clean sheet design? The only thing that looks different in design is the foldable wingtips - but then, what happens if the restraining bolts on those fail mid-flight due to a simple... washer being dropped off during a maintenance... (I enjoy watching the National Geographic's MayDay series - as it illustrates just how we develop safer Aircraft from lessons learned when crashes occur... I'd rather fly in a Gas guzzler that is near the end of a series of iterations of design fixes... than one at the beginning).

I wonder if the NTSB are reviewing any FAA approvals ? If they are, then they must surely be sickened by their rubber stamping of the 737 Max, and I hope those who did the rubber-stamping are eventually held to account.

To me, Boeing has lost Credibility as an ongoing Manufacturer of Commercial Airlines. They have to come up with some super-convincing stuff if they wish me to change my mind, and ... perhaps set a more realistic monetary amount per life lost... 200,000 US$ is absolute rubbish... add at least 2 zeros to that per Passenger, and I'd think that'd Boeing (and other Airline Manufacturers) may consider carefully, before doing a rush job.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Boeing is Boeing, **** Airbus .

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The only thing that looks different in design is the foldable wingtips -

For one thing the wing is an entirely new design. It is a larger wingspan (hence the folding wingtips), and the wings are carrying a larger and heavier engine. Much different structurally than the 1st gen.

> but then, what happens if the restraining bolts on those fail mid-flight

The folding wingtip design is based on that used by the F/A-18 E/F Super Hornet. You know, a naval fighter jet. The kind of fighter jets that have had folding wings for decades, and have never had a problem like you postulate even though they are subjected to greater forces than an airliner will ever encounter.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites