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From left: Subaru CEO Atsushi Osaki, Toyota CEO Koji Sato and Mazda CEO Masahiro Moro pose at a press conference pledging to each develop a new engine, in Tokyo on Tuesday. Image: REUTERS/Kim Kyung-Hoon
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Toyota, Mazda, Subaru to develop new engines in hybrid push

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Last attempt before EV take over market.

-18 ( +3 / -21 )

I just cannot see EV take over. Sure they will sell, especially if the price China is offering remains low, but there are so many hurdles to overcome. Many city dwellers have no personal charging points being one. Also we have no idea about resale value, or how long these cars can run. If it is anything like my Iphone battery, in a few years it will need charging every few hours.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

My 13-year-old Honda Hybrid isn't showing any signs of age yet, the concept is convincing. I hope for many more years. I think it's more sustainable not to change your car every few years than to follow trends. I'm not against electric cars at all, but my next and therefore last car will also be a hybrid. It is wise that the domestic carmakers are not switching completely to electric yet.

14 ( +15 / -1 )

Europe's total ICE ban, including hybrids, is only 11 years away.

Biden intends to make ICEs more expensive than EVs by 2030 to force drivers to switch to EV.

If Japanese bet the farm on hydrogen fuel cell vehicles I understand, but ICE?

-5 ( +4 / -9 )

@smuf I think it's more sustainable not to change your car every few years than to follow trends. 

Very true. Our big old Hilus Surf that we run on WVO (waste vegetable oil) is over 30 years old and still going strong.

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Samit BasuToday  08:28 am JST

Europe's total ICE ban, including hybrids, is only 11 years away.

Biden intends to make ICEs more expensive than EVs by 2030 to force drivers to switch to EV.

If Japanese bet the farm on hydrogen fuel cell vehicles I understand, but ICE?

I don't think they are though... it reads...

"As technologies for all-electric vehicles advance, we need to think about plug-in hybrid vehicles that center around electric power rather than internal combustion engines," he said

4 ( +4 / -0 )

For the foreseeable future - a transition period to EVs - PHEVs make most sense.

A car that for all daily intents and purposes only uses electricity, particularly in the most polluted environments - cities, and can switch smoothly to a small hi-tech ICE if needed, esp for trips.

The technology exists now and is developing as the article states, for incredibly fuel efficient engines compact in size and powerful in performance.

The total environmental footprint of such vehicles would be very low, and allow for a smoother more practical move to totally electric in the future - say in 30+years.

But with laws already in place in some places, this option seems to be already discarded - unfortunately.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Hybrids best EVs hands down!

EVs are still and expensive gimmick . Maybe when the batteries last longer and have a much better distance/ charge capacity! Imagine the current infrastructure trying to accommodate only EVs on the road?! Just can't happen.

Hybrids everytime!

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Old wine in new bottle.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

smart move.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

I don't think the world is ready for a large percentage of EVs.

Some hybrids are fantastic and others are meh, the Subaru XV for example. It all depends on how its done. F1 cars and most super cars and hyper cars are hybrids now. Each car should be judged on its merits, not on whether its a "hybrid" or an "EV". Lots of EVs are great, but there are also moronic ones like the Cybertruck. Anything that can cut its owner's leg just by brushing past it or can cut your fingers when you wash it has serious problems.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Smart move. The EV market is going into free-fall because the early adopters already have theirs, and the subsidies are drying up. Aside from city-dwellers with home charging units and short-range travel needs, EVs are useless despite what governments, cheerleaders and EV makers claim.

Hybrids, on the other hand, are a good trade-off. My brother bought a Mini PHEV recently, which he runs off electric most of the time and only needs to use the petrol motor on the highway.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Subaru's Boxster and Mazda's Rotary engines both get terrible fuel economy. It would take hybridization just to get them to current levels of Toyota's most efficient ICE's.

It appears that Mazda and Suburu have the most to gain with this partnership. (And, I'm a big Mazda fan.)

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Just received a notice in the mail stating anyone who owns a petrol or diesel car will have to pay an additional 15% in vehicle tax in my prefecture in order to save the environment. What kind of nonsense is this? It is far more eco friendly that I keep my car well maintained for it's entire lifespan than for me to take it to the junk yard and go out and buy an overpriced RC car that still has no charging network in Japan. Eventually when my car does die, I will consider getting myself a solar roof and an EV if the infrastructure is there and it is affordable, but at the moment a PHEV seems to be the better option.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Yes, with Mazda, you'd want them to hybridize the efficient, high-compression engines they sell as "SkyActiv". This assumes they could spin em up quickly on demand, a key factor for Toyota's hybrid system where the engine is stopped about 2/3 of the time.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

kohakuebisu

Yes, with Mazda, you'd want them to hybridize the efficient, high-compression engines they sell as "SkyActiv". 

Exactly. The fact they are even bringing the highly fuel-inefficient rotary engine into the discussion is puzzling.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Europe's total ICE ban, including hybrids, is only 11 years away.

Biden intends to make ICEs more expensive than EVs by 2030 to force drivers to switch to EV.

However such goals are often pushed back , watered down or abandoned depending on prevailing political winds, for better or worse. Who knows what will really happen in 11 years time.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

When the entire world recognizes the need to advance the electricity revolution, the ancient conservative Japanese try to stick to combustion engines. This is pathetic.

-4 ( +2 / -6 )

I suppose it makes sense since they want to sell cars outside of Europe and big american cities as well. When charging stations are as common as gas stations I imagine most people will go for electric cars though.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

EVs are the way forward but the charging points will be in the road not at charging stations as they currently are.

This way of charging has still to be recognized as the future norm but it will be.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Until they solve the charging speed problem for people like me who live in an apartment block with no ability to “recharge” at home over night I can’t buy an electric. Maybe hydrogen will be in the mix, but we will need more refueling stations and much cheaper cars/fuel. We aren’t going to stop having gasoline in 10 years time as cars have a 20 year plus lifetime. So we have 30 odd years to improve infrastructure, improve technology, have better batteries. But gasoline won’t disappear until we have all switched to something else. I still remember the coal man in the 1990s. And I remember an old cart and horse coming around our area in the 1970s. I would have thought all those second family juku, supermarket, runabout little K cars were just ripe to be turned electric.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

we have 30 odd years

Not at all. We don't have time.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

Definitely Subaru is not looking in the same direction - At least that what the picture says

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Europe's total ICE ban, including hybrids, is only 11 years away.

Like so many of their utopian goals, this is not gonna happen. They will have much bigger worries in the next 11 years.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

There is a continuum of possibilities from ICE-only through to pure EV with hybrids linking the two. Japanese car makers have held on to the belief that pure EV is not the best solution for most motorists and have kept faith with the hybrid. After the Tesla hysteria of the past decade, the market is now proving them to be correct. I read this news as describing a plan to allow an increase the EV aspect of the hybrids with a concomitant reduction of the ICE part: a smaller, more efficient petrol engine charging a larger battery with more time spent under electrical power. Somewhere down the track the hybrid will merge with the range-extender.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

a smaller, more efficient petrol engine charging a larger battery with more time spent under electrical power.

The question is what is the source of the energy? Does the energy originates from carbon or from benign sources?

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

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