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Nikkei gains over 1,000 points to briefly trade above 38,000 in 34-year high

23 Comments

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Ticking along very well. My prediction of 40,000 points in '24 is looking almost certain, likely by June.

Beg, borrow, or steal to invest in Nikkei stocks now!

10 ( +17 / -7 )

Don't get too excited. Blow-off top.

-9 ( +6 / -15 )

My NISA is going up, up, up!

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Govt. has given Japan Inc. green light to raise prices (and profits!). No surprise consumers not happy with Kishida-San. Same dynamic in US, approx. 85% of top 1% support Biden, all-time record for any Pres., but all other demographic groups dropping in their Biden support.

Do be reminded constant currency adjusted, returns not nearly so positive = Yen remains a dumpster fire.

-10 ( +8 / -18 )

"The latest financial reports from companies have not disappointed investors, and with the outlook generally looking good for the next quarter, participants are feeling there's no need for pessimism," said Toshikazu Horiuchi, equity strategist at IwaiCosmo Securities Co.

Yes no need for pessimism amongst the capital holders. The 90% Japanese working class is a different story.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Economy/Japan-s-corporate-profits-aren-t-trickling-down-new-data-shows

Funny how that headline works out.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

That is mostly only a theoretical value or gain. Only if you really sell you will set it into practice and receive the (btw currently weak) money, but then you also are again poorer on paper with less or not anymore invested. So even those gains for the few riches come finally at quite a cost for them.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Major corporations happy, investors happy, BOJ happy, the other 99% of the population extremely UNhappy with the current state of affairs. But as long as that 1% is pleased, nothing will change for the rest of us. Dollar will be at ¥150 yen by the end of the month for sure.

-6 ( +12 / -18 )

@smithinjapan

Spot on!!!

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

What goes up, comes down…

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

Just like the bubble economy of 25 years ago, there will be a bloodbath when this particular bubble bursts. And it will like they all do.

-7 ( +2 / -9 )

What goes up, comes down…

Nope. Cant see it happening. The only way is up - the economy is soaring, tourism booming and company profits are going through the roof. Not to mention a weak yen which is boosting Japanese exports.

The Japanese economy is underpinned by very solid foundations.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Stock markets are no reflection of the health of an economy.

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

@Fighto! from what I have seen when in Japan corporate wages increased and employee wages remain flat, this has shown me a disparity between the distribution of profits within a company and passing it on to its employee. In addition stagnant employee wages usually result in decreased consumer spending power, and we have all seen this affecting the overall economy So how can this be the only way up?

What goes up, comes down…

Nope. Cant see it happening. The only way is up - the economy is soaring, tourism booming and company profits are going through the roof. Not to mention a weak yen which is boosting Japanese exports.

The Japanese economy is underpinned by very solid foundations.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Enjoy it.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Peter NeilToday  09:52 pm JST

Stock markets are no reflection of the health of an economy.

I have to agree. The economy should reflect how the people are in life. Can they afford a home? Can they afford health care or get access to care? Could they save a little? and probably the most important of all. Are they happy with their life?

A company's share price doesn't have any effect on anyone's happiness, whether or not we can afford a home, save something for our future, or if we can access health care. That's the true economy. GDP means nothing if half your population can't afford a home, can't afford health care, and aren't happy. if we were to think about the richest country in the world..then the USA should be the happiest, afford a home, and access reasonable health care, afford education.But sadly that doesn't apply to any of the G7 nations. Thats the true economy.IMHO Makes you wonder why the USA isn't the happiest.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Keep going Nikkei..

Why this news triggered to much whiners??

LOL

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Although this has not spread to small and medium-sized companies, large companies are already seeing increases in wages and bonuses.

If this economic boom continues for a long time, even small and medium-sized enterprises will likely see wage increases for the first time in a while.

If there is anything that could put a brake on this, it would be the extreme rise in the value of the yen due to the US interest rate cuts. Further rise in crude oil prices. Other reasons include the worsening political situation around Japan.

First of all, we are very grateful for the rise in stock prices.

Watching stock prices rise every day makes me look forward to the future.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

What happened to the Moscow Exchange earlier today?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

the other 99% of the population extremely UNhappy 

Biggest holders of equities and other securities are pension funds and other social security funds. Plus, life insurance, non-life insurance, etc., which protect people financially. If people are "unhappy," then they are ignorant.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Biggest holders of equities and other securities are pension funds and other social security funds. Plus, life insurance, non-life insurance, etc., which protect people financially. If people are "unhappy," then they are ignorant.

The key is to make sure the prosperity is broad-based. This helps to keep the elites safe too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The key is to make sure the prosperity is broad-based. 

Yes, indeed. The advent of ETF index funds and online self-directed accounts have democraticized retail investment. Tons of products out there that anyone with even modest sums can use, many of which have nearly zero fees.

In Japan's case, there's NISA and IDECO, which allow working people to make good returns at very low cost and without having to pay any tax on their gains!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

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