business

Yoshinoya releases new line of canned, ready-to-eat beef bowls

23 Comments
By Casey Baseel, SoraNews24

Yoshinoya boasts convenient locations all across Japan, extremely reasonable prices, and tasty food that’s relatively healthy, so there’s really not much need to get out your pots and pans if you’ve got a branch in your neighborhood. Actually, you don’t even need a branch nearby, thanks to the company’s newest offering: canned Yoshinoya beef bowls.

The tinned meals come ready-to-eat, requiring no cooking. Simply pop the top, grab your chopsticks, and dig in.

But while the standard gyudon (beef bowl) is Yoshinoya’s primary claim to fame, over the year the chain has expanded its menu to include a number of other rice bowls, many of which are also making the jump to canned food.

yc-3.png

The complete canned Yoshinoya lineup consists of six choices, with the standard beef bowl joined by yakiniku beef, yakitori chicken, pork, ginger pork and even salted grilled mackerel, for those craving seafood.

You might notice that instead of the white rice usually used for Yoshinoya’s menu items, all of the canned versions used brown rice instead, specifically Kin no Ibuku rice grown in Japan’s Miyagi Prefecture. That’s a decision that was made because of brown rice’s higher nutritional value compared to white rice, because while Yoshinoya has long been a metaphorical life-saver for students, bachelors, and other demographic groups that are generally too busy and/or lazy to cook for themselves, the canned Yoshinoya meals are meant to be literal life-savers, and are designed to be kept on hand as emergency supplies for disaster preparedness.

This isn’t Yoshinoya’s first foray into natural disaster countermeasures, either. When a powerful earthquake struck Japan’s Kumamoto Prefecture in 2016, Yoshinoya, as well as beef bowl chain rival Sukiya, dispatched mobile kitchens to the area to hand out free meals to victims of the quake.

Of course, there’s no rule against buying the cans to keep on hand and eating them when your personal emergency is just “being really hungry and not wanting to cook.” The canned Yoshinoya meals can be purchased through the company’s online shop here, where sets of one each of the six flavors or six-can bundles of a single type are identically priced at 4,860 yen (except for the six-can set of mackerel, which is slightly cheaper at 4,590 yen.

Source: Yoshinoya via Entabe

Read more stories from SoraNews24.

-- Yoshinoya, Japan’s biggest beef bowl chain, is now serving fried chicken in Tokyo

-- Yoshinoya studying what happens to the body after three months of eating beef bowls

-- Yoshinoya has an ultra-luxurious wagyu beef bowl you can only get one place in Japan【Taste test】

© SoraNews24

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

23 Comments
Login to comment

G-R-O-S-S!

But maybe if ur camping for a week and need variety.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Yes, go fir the killing 4,800yen for six small cans.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I saw the headline and thought 'oooh I need to get my hands on these' and then I saw the pictures and... no, no I don't think so...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Looks like dog food. I used to feed Alpo to my dog in the 70s - looks identical.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Or cat food. Sheeba, anyone?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

These are perfect for my bomb shelter.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I can stack them next to my K-rations.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Maybe Yoshinoya can market these for the end times.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Don't like it, don't eat it.

-5 ( +0 / -5 )

Wow! I was thinking that would be good emergency food (the only time I could imagine suggesting someone eat something like that) but it is far too expensive!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

So now dog food is served to humans, great way to keep costs down!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Yoshinoya is seeking for a new business.

I feel the price is high.

Why is it a can type? Though it was good if it was retort type.

Opps, i can not eat, because i have an allergy to mackerel.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Cat food at its best.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

I feel ill just looking at it!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

For me emergency food is bisquits and crackers.

They use brown rice obviously because white rice would get stained.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Wow! How awesome! A new line of gourmet pet food!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Have never entered a Yoshinoya but my wife made the mistake of ordering their frozen packs once through our local Coop. Tasted absolutely foul.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

the canned Yoshinoya meals are meant to be literal life-savers, and are designed to be kept on hand as emergency supplies for disaster preparedness.

It's emergency rations. The stuff you resort to eating when the earthquake and tsunami has left you sitting in a field with only your emergency bag and a candle (You do have an emergency bag ready, don't you?)

Maybe they look more appetising when you haven't eaten for three days.

At that price, though.... No thanks. Even if it wasn't meat.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Maybe my math is off, but at 4800 yen per 6 pack of cans, isn't that like double the price of a regular sized beef bowl (which also appears to be double in size) in a regular store?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

tasty food

That's debatable.

that’s relatively healthy

Fatty beef and white rice is relatively healthy? Relative to what? Potato chips?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

this is some disgusting food.... not that actual yoshinoya is much better but atleast its kinda fresh...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I was initially shocked when I read the headlines because I read it as "beef bowels" rather than "beef bowls." I am an adventuresome eater and was ready to try it anyway, after all I am a lover of horumonyaki .

The photos reminds me of the C Rations I ate many years ago in the US military. The canned beef looked like dog food but was actually quite palatable.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

relatively healthy

Credit where credit is due - they're using brown rice in these.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites