crime

23-year-old man arrested for killing older sister

20 Comments

Police in Yokohama said Monday they have arrested a 23-year-old man on suspicion of killing his 25-year-old sister.

According to police, Tomomasa Kanae, a company employee, strangled his sister Mamiko at their home at around 11 p.m. on June 9, and then called 110, Fuji TV reported. Mamiko was taken to hospital where she remained in a coma. Kanae was initially charged with attempted murder.

However, Mamiko died on Sunday and police upgraded the charge against her brother to murder.

Kanae was quoted by police as saying he strangled his sister after they got into an argument about household duties such as cooking, cleaning and washing.

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20 Comments
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I know this isn't my culture but I am a firm believer of leaving the nest at 18. Either take the initiative or get the boot from parents.

-6 ( +4 / -10 )

DaDudeToday 05:14 pm JST

I know this isn't my culture but I am a firm believer of leaving the nest at 18. Either take the initiative or get the boot from parents."

Interesting point. There do seem to be a large number of intra-family crimes like this. I wonder if your solution could help, although I think the shortage of liveable space precludes such an innovative idea and basically forces them to live together. Oh well, back to the drawing board.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Anybody who kills somebody, be it a family member or a stranger, because of household duties cannot be of sound mind.

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

“I know this isn't my culture but I am a firm believer of leaving the nest at 18.”

There is no mention of the parents so we don’t know if they were still in the nest or not. I’ve known siblings who left their hometown and shared an apartment while attending university and through first few years of working to save money.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

A big problem in Japan is many that children don't do household chores.Treat their home like a hotel.This can only encourage laziness and resentment if you're dealing with someone who does nothing.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

@cracaphat

To add to your comment, I've been reading a book about the role of the mother in Japan, where it talks about the mother letting children focus completely on their studies, and taking pride in doing all the chores around the houses, especially letting male children off easily. I do think that creates young people who aren't able to be independent and live by themselves. A little off-topic, but worth thinking about.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Ahhh ok, another week another family murder.

-6 ( +1 / -7 )

And, here’s today’s family murder, just a minor distraction from the earthquake news.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Ahhh ok, another week another family murder.

You'd think we lived on earth or something.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Anyone know what percent of murders in Japan are between family members? Is it higher in Japan versus other countries?

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

That's a valid question

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Normal here, show me one male here that lives along and has a normal clean room...Bad parenting when they expect mummy to pick up after them when they grown are adults. Living at home forever and mummy doing all the cleaning is the parents fault for not drumming hygene and common sense in to them at a young age.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

This is why I moved to Europe.

I am lucky enough to have been blessed with a closely knitted family. But there are a lot of crazies in Japan, and altho they do exist in public too, its crimes like these that make you wonder.

Killing his own sister because she wants him to do the dishes. And Japanese men complain about foreigners taking their women, well, they don't have any other men to choose from..

I had 1 boyfriend at home before I moved, he was occasionally affectionate in public, I'll give him that. But he didn't do much to keep it going otherwise.

Japanese women aren't saints neither, especially some mothers.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@Jonorth. I've been hearing mothers tell me for 25 years how their children do nothing.But for some reason they're proud of what they don' t teach their kids to do around the house.And posters might boo you in reading that book,but they're not writing anything to rebut,meaning to me, it signifies that they are part of the problem themselves in their upbringing whether Japanese or not.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Such a stupid and childish reason

2 ( +2 / -0 )

“they got into an argument about household duties such as cooking, cleaning and washing.”

I agree that most mothers here do too much of the household chores for their children (especially sons) without teaching them the skills they need for adulthood. And I’ve met some who then complain that their grown sons who have moved back home after school or failed tries at life elsewhere are lazy and don’t help around the house. I’ve wondered why they are surprised or upset, after all, that’s how they raised them to be.

But to be fair, the quote above from the article doesn’t tell us which of the siblings was or wasn’t doing chores, only that he says they were arguing. I have met some extremely fastidious Japanese men who kept pristine homes, and some Japanese women who lived in pigstyes of their own making. So without more information we can’t tell for sure about this pair.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I don't know if there is any basis in reality behind it, but my buddies and I used to joke that there was a direct correlation between how hot a girl was, and how much bad she was at cleaning. Hotter the girl, messier the home.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

StrangerlandToday 08:43 am JST

I don't know if there is any basis in reality behind it, but my buddies and I used to joke that there was a direct correlation between how hot a girl was, and how much bad she was at cleaning. Hotter the girl, messier the home."

There could be a vague correlation, as the time it takes to put on warpaint before going out may make less time available for chores.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Ah yes, another week, another family killing story. What's going on in Japan? I tell you, its almost like a normal thing now to read some news like this!

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The issue is not who does the housework. The issue is HOW one communicates that the housework needs to be done. If she was a typical nag and verbally & emotionally abused him (ie, constantly NAGGED him), then it's no surprise that he finally snapped and lashed back at her.

Why do you think -- of all places in her body -- he went for her throat?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

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