crime

3 men arrested for selling All Blacks merchandise in violation of trademark law

17 Comments

Three foreign men have been arrested on suspicion of violating the trademark law after they illegally sold New Zealand rugby merchandise, police said Wednesday.

According to police, the three men, led by a 43-year-old Israeli, sold All Blacks scarves outside Ajinomoto Stadium in Tokyo on Oct 6, Fuji TV reported. The three suspects were not authorized to sell any Rugby World Cup merchandise, police said.

The men sold 94 items, which were made in China, to rugby fans at various venues during the tournament. Police said they have denied the allegation, saying that they didn’t know selling the scarves was against Japanese law.

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17 Comments
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Thank heavens these dastardly criminals have been arrested. I will sleep so much more soundly tonight knowing these vicious thugs have been taken off the street.

Not.

9 ( +17 / -8 )

And all the Japanese doing same, no arrests made?

0 ( +10 / -10 )

It's not like any of that so called real stuff is made in NZ.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

I wonder....do the purchasers actually care?

8 ( +13 / -5 )

I must've read this wrong. This made news because they were selling some scarves that people were delighted to buy and didn't give a rats if it were fake and they didn't know it was against the law to sell scarves outside a stadium? Come on now! If it were written in an easily viewable spot "NO SELLING OF MERCHANDISE WITHIN THE PREMISES OF THIS STADIUM", that would make sense, but I feel like they really didn't know.

miss_oikawa

You said it best! These criminals armed with deadly fake scarves are exactly where they belong! Japan is 96% safer with these dangerous, dastardly, yet daring criminals are off its streets!

0 ( +9 / -9 )

So, how long can you stand out on the street selling whatever, in your own countries and not get stopped by da' Man?

6 ( +8 / -2 )

I saw several groups running the gauntlet outside the stadiums... they had look outs and put their scarves etc away when the police or organisers came by. These were maybe a little slow?

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Why are so many of you defending this people? Yes, they are not criminals in the same way as a serial killer, but it's still copyright infringement. They perfectly well knew what they were doing was illegal.

How would you like it if you copyrighted something, and someone else profits off of your idea?

10 ( +14 / -4 )

Why are so many of you defending this people? Yes, they are not criminals in the same way as a serial killer, but it's still copyright infringement. 

Because trademark infringement has always been a civil issue, not a criminal issue. I hate the idea that the police and criminal system are using our taxes to criminalize a civil case for private companies.

2 ( +7 / -5 )

It would have made more sense if they'd been arrested for selling counterfeit goods than for peddling w/o a license...

4 ( +4 / -0 )

It's fan merchandise...like fan fic. Is fan fic illegal?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

"Authorised to sell"

Sounds like a cartel. If I buy clocks from a company (wholesaler) and sell them myself (retailer), isn't that just called capitalism?

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Probably would have been better going with the new trending defense; " I don't recall the incident "

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Good ol’ keystones keeping Japan safe from foreign devils!

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

Because trademark infringement has always been a civil issue, not a criminal issue.

Though in Japan, the law makes it a criminal issue

Change the law

1 ( +2 / -1 )

eco atNov. 14  02:10 pm JST

“It would have made more sense if they'd been arrested for selling counterfeit goods than for peddling w/o a license..”

I’d be happy for them to be arrested on both those charges. Some years ago I had to translate for one of the then common Israeli sellers of counterfeit brand goods like wallets and such at a local festival. He maintained he didn’t need a permit from the city to sell at that location because he had permission from the yakuza. He swiftly learned differently when the police arrived to arrest him.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Comanteer, “Because trademark infringement has always been a civil issue, not a criminal issue.”

So how does that work? Representatives from all companies and organizations that sell things that might be counterfeited constantly roaming all locations where they might be sold? And when they find people selling them like these how do they obtain information as to their identity and normal whereabouts in order to go about suing them?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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