crime

61-year-old man kept father's body at home; says he didn’t want to be separated from him

11 Comments

Police in Tokyo have arrested a 61-year-old unemployed man on suspicion of abandoning the body of his 91-year-old father at their residence in Adachi Ward. 

According to police, Nobuyuki Takeda kept the body of his father Masaaki in the apartment they shared from the end of July until Aug 24.

A neighbor noticed a foul odor coming from the Takeda apartment and contacted police on Aug 24. When officers arrived, the decaying body of Takeda’s father, wearing pajamas, was found lying on top of a futon.

Following his mother's death, Takeda had been living with his father for about 40 years. He was quoted by police as saying, "I was scared of suddenly being alone. I didn't want to be separated from my father."

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11 Comments
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He is 61, been living with dad for 40 years? After his mom died, he moved in with dad at the time he was 21 years old and supposedly an adult here. Meaning mom and dad were divorced. and he's been a latch-key kid ever since?

Dad did not do his job in raising his son!

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Didn't want to be separated from his dad's pension more like

11 ( +12 / -1 )

This is what happens when families bear the responsibility of taking care of their physically/intellectually challenged children. The parents grow old, infirm, and die, and the child, now middle-aged, has nowhere to turn.

This man is probably one of those challenged children, and Japan is not kind to, nor does encourage the independent living of, such people.

Poor man, and his poor father, who took care of him and must have worried about this very situation.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

@Maria -This is what happens when families bear the responsibility of taking care of their physically/intellectually challenged children. 

That's a rare scenario in Japan. The most common scenario is reversed with middle-aged pr elderly children taking care of their ailing parents and just waiting for them to die so they can get on with their own lives. This scenario also leads to many murders.

This particular case is quite unusual. I guess it is possible the son has a few screws loose and his reason given is true. However, given the regular reason of this scenario it is more likely he kept his father around for his pension.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This particular case is quite unusual. I guess it is possible the son has a few screws loose and his reason given is true. However, given the regular reason of this scenario it is more likely he kept his father around for his pension.

I don't see anything regular about leaving a decaying body right smack on the futon. He definitely had some loose screws...

1 ( +2 / -1 )

therougouToday 10:18 am JSTThis particular case is quite unusual. I guess it is possible the son has a few screws loose and his reason given is true. However, given the regular reason of this scenario it is more likely he kept his father around for his pension.

I don't see anything regular about leaving a decaying body right smack on the futon. He definitely had some loose screws...

How could he bear the stench of decay?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

That's just super sad...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I knew the word 'unemployed' would be in there somewhere. Been sponging off Dad since forever and was afraid of those pension benefits getting cut off and him having to actually work for the first time in his life.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

yeah right... sounds totally normal (sarcasm).

the sad thing is that I read these kind of news everyday.

when is Japan going to address its enormous problem of people refusing to leave their parent's house because they're either hikikomori or too scared of society?

when is Japan going to address these huge psychological issues that it's population suffers?

it seems to me all they are doing is just trying not to acknowledge them, just waiting for them to disappear.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

There is a misquote in this article. What he actually said was 'I was scared of suddenly having to find a job. I didn't want to be separated from my father's pension.'

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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