crime

630 cases of violence against train station employees reported in fiscal 2018

35 Comments

A report issued this week by the Association of Japanese Private Railways and the Japan Railways (JR) Group says that there were 630 cases of violence against employees both in stations and aboard trains in fiscal 2018, 26 fewer incidents than the previous year.

Following 800 reported incidents of physical assault in 2014, the number has been steadily decreasing over the years. While this figure is still relatively high, the report stated that many of the perpetrators were over the age of 60 (accounting for 25% of the violent incidents).

From July 12, the JR Group will put up posters drawn from a child’s perspective with the slogan, “You shouldn’t hit anyone,” within the train stations in the Tokyo metropolitan region. These posters are intended to call attention to violence by passengers directed at train company employees.

According to the association, the number of reported assaults has declined each year due to each railway company strengthening its patrols and setting up security cameras within trains, which have led to prevention of violent outbreaks.

The report was compiled from reports from 35 businesses including major private railway companies and the JR Group. Additionally, data on the perpetrators show that 53% (336 cases) were intoxicated. When divided by age group, people in their 60s accounted for the highest cases of violence (25%), followed by those in their 50s (20%), and passengers in their 30s (18%). By gender, 92% of the perpetrators were males.

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35 Comments
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Only 50% were drunk? I guess the other 50% were just crazed.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Old people with over-inflated senses of entitlement that can't handle their booze.

14 ( +15 / -1 )

From July 12, the JR Group will put up posters drawn from a child’s perspective with the slogan, “You shouldn’t hit anyone,”

Gimmie a break, if all it takes is a poster to get people to stop improper behavior then the world would be covered in them!

How about actually making people pay for their crimes! Not all people need to go to jail, but to stop bad behavior, you need to make people aware that they will be punished, within the law, and broadcast this everywhere!

Keeping crimes out of the eyes of the public does no one any good! Making people aware of what is going on around them, will force them to crawl out of their perceived bubbles of safety, and demand action!

Oh wait, this is Japan, the land of "heiwa boke" and "Japanese don'T commit crimes" mentality!

8 ( +10 / -2 )

Lol, before I read the statistic, I was like...being this is Japan, let me guess...

Who is the most likely person to ridiculously get in your face for no reason? Drunk old nasty men!

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Bitter, possibly sexually frustrated, elderly account for the highest demographic? What a shock. Also they're attacking people who they know won't retaliate. Manly.

I'd like to know what the cause of the violence is? I've witnessed a few instances of station staff being verbally abused because a train is late, as if it's the station staffs fault. Yikes.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

The poster is just another comic written from a child’s perspective to communicate with all the adult children. How about serious poster and a serious on-the-spot fine for anybody who disrupts the ‘reiwa’. Plus, criminal assault charges.

9 ( +9 / -0 )

Good News. From 800 in 2014 cases to 630 in 2019. That is 21% reduction in the number of cases.

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

Good News. From 800 in 2014 cases to 630 in 2019. That is 21% reduction in the number of cases. In comparison, in nyc there has been 10% increase in the number of cases. LOL LOL at the Japan haters again.

Japan haters? Hardly, for those of us who have been living here quite a long time we dont have the rose colored glasses on anymore and take a hard realistic look at what it is like to live and work here. Unlike those whose still smell like they have jet-fumes stuck to them and think they are in paradise, Japan is no better, and in many ways, no worse, than any other country in the world.

Those wanna-be's who think they have "turned" Japanese, and joined the collective, refuse to accept that the paradise here isn't a paradise, it's just Japan!

10 ( +11 / -1 )

From July 12, the JR Group will put up posters drawn from a child’s perspective with the slogan, “You shouldn’t hit anyone,” within the train stations in the Tokyo metropolitan region. These posters are intended to call attention to violence by passengers directed at train company employees.

I am sure every enraged person calms down and thinks “the poster is right, I should hit anyone.”

3 ( +5 / -2 )

When divided by age group, people in their 60s accounted for the highest cases of violence (25%), followed by those in their 50s (20%), and passengers in their 30s (18%). By gender, 92% of the perpetrators were males.

Kids moving out and not bothering to visit their parents until they fall ill, old people unable to make friends or join activities for the senior, wandering the cities with all their frustration with the world.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Instead of making the cutesy little crayon drawing of a silly cartoon character with a childish message aimed at grown adults, why not just have a sign that's instead says "ASSAULT ON TRANSIT EMPLOYEES WILL RESULT IN CRIMINAL PROSECUTION, HEAVY FINES, AND/OR IMPRISONMENT"?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Good News. From 800 in 2014 cases to 630 in 2019. That is 21% reduction in the number of cases. In comparison, in nyc there has been 10% increase in the number of cases. LOL LOL at the Japan haters again.

Those wanna-be's who think they have "turned" Japanese, and joined the collective, refuse to accept that the paradise here isn't a paradise,

"it's just Japan!"

Your right. It is Japan and Japan has done a good job in reducing the number of case of violence against train employees . Can America or the west say the same?

-14 ( +0 / -14 )

@alwaysspeakingwisdom - Your right. It is Japan and Japan has done a good job in reducing the number of case of violence against train employees . Can America or the west say the same?

please give details of what Japan has done to get this results?

8 ( +9 / -1 )

If you work face to face with the public, you are at risk of abuse and violence. Add to this an over arching sense of entitlement that many members of the public have and staff are just punching bags. Employers should recognise this and do risk assessments for all staff. Proper punishment for offenders would help too.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

please give details of what Japan has done to get this results?

It says in the article?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

There is usually a koban somewhere close to a train station. Staff should detain these idiots until the cops arrive, and the cops can then escort them out of the station and decide how to deal with them. Offenders should also be banned from using that train line. Long walk home.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Majority over the age of 60? Not surprised

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Japan haters? Hardly, for those of us who have been living here quite a long time we dont have the rose colored glasses on anymore and take a hard realistic look at what it is like to live and work here. Unlike those whose still smell like they have jet-fumes stuck to them and think they are in paradise, Japan is no better, and in many ways, no worse, than any other country in the world.

Those wanna-be's who think they have "turned" Japanese, and joined the collective, refuse to accept that the paradise here isn't a paradise, it's just Japan!

Yes, but generally speaking many long-term expats do get cynical/bitter/jaded and start picking too many faults with their new host country. I mean, you're not being forced to live in Japan...but in any case, it's best to just be reasonable and seek the truth. Not be overly positive or negative.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Add to this an over arching sense of entitlement that many members of the public have

Yes, there are so many so-called "monster customers" today. It's hard to deal with.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japan's makeup culture and past are changing, not because of foreigners as I suspect in this case the offenders are middle aged Japanese men, simply "not being done" is clearly not enough anymore.

The police have to start actually policing, "I don't remember" "I was drunk" are not good enough ever.. same on roads, red lights, pedestrian crossings, people smoking where they shouldn't.. there is a group of self entitled middle age and older men making Japan less of a nice place to be.

We had one show up at our company without an appointment to yell at support staff yesterday.. he just wanted to be the loud guy in the room, he knew there was nothing to be done, just built up his rage and it split over and for some reason think that gives him permission to act terribly.

I felt sorry for my Japanese co-workers as they felt they needed to placate this man-child..

This isn't everyone of course.. and there are young people and older people, women too.. but there is a theme unfortunately.

Assault train staff or passengers on public transport detain until police arrive every time!

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I thought all violent criminals in Japan were foreign ?

2 ( +4 / -2 )

@Alex Einz

We are. I use violence against insects almost daily.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

please give details of what Japan has done to get this results?

@Isthizak - It says in the article

It does NOT say anything in the article. It only says they will start using those stupidly childish signs from July 12.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Considering the number of passengers that use the train system in Japan over the course of a year 630 is a pretty small number of incidents.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

Do the hustle, “It does NOT say anything in the article.”

Notice this paragraph:

“According to the association, the number of reported assaults has declined each year due to each railway company strengthening its patrols and setting up security cameras within trains, which have led to prevention of violent outbreaks.”

0 ( +1 / -1 )

@CaptDingleheimer

It says in the tiny bullet points at the bottom that JR will call the police on any violent conduct and that it can result in jail time of up to 15 years. I agree with you that this should be the main thrust of the poster.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Ban them from the line? I like that idea! Maybe that's what the poster should say.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

 I mean, you're not being forced to live in Japan...

I personally hate it when anyone, Japanese or foreigner, brings this up to make a point.

I mean no I am not forced to be here with my wife, children, family and friends! I CHOOSE to live here!

I mean hell, YOU are not "forced" to live anywhere today! Unless you are from North Korea I suppose!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Oddly, here in Miyazaki I have only twice seen anyone here be rude to staff. I suppose less stress here and a slower pace (sometimes infuriatingly slow) is the key factor. A secondary factor is that places are not stacked one on another here and the living spaces are much bigger.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Can I take it that these statistics are just for Tokyo, or is it for the whole of Japan ? although 630 assaults on staff it 1 to many, but putting it into the grand schemes of things it not to many when you take into consideration the amount of staff that is employed through out all of the stations in Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Given that assault here in Japan can be defined as raising your arms, ( hence, face to face buffering of chests & screeching gets a pass ) and the propensity for crying wolf, butt hurt. I doubt that these stats are based on real world violent content.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Everyone is complaining about 60+'s for being responsible for the majority of incidents. But they acutally make up more than 30% of the population, so with 25% of the incidents they are underrepresented.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Brian WhewayToday  02:47 pm JST

“Can I take it that these statistics are just for Tokyo, or is it for the whole of Japan ?”

There’s nothing in the article to indicate its limited to Tokyo incidents, so I’m assuming it’s a nationwide statistic.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Typical. Put up posters and that'll solve everything…

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I find it oddly interesting that, the entire article is skewed towards the passenger being the culprit. Lets put some cameras on the trains a monitor the entire situation. I am very curious how many of these altercations may have been instigated by a overzealous employee with an inferiority complex. Simple cameras and big signs that say smile.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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