crime

77-year-old man arrested for hitting wife after suspecting she allowed man in her nursing home room

11 Comments

Police in Kitakyushu City, Fukuoka Prefecture, have arrested a 77-year-old man on suspicion of assault after he hit his 80-year-old wife with a cane in the nursing home where they both live.

According to police, the incident occurred at around 4:30 p.m. on Monday. Local media reported the suspect hit his wife in the face with a cane after accusing her of letting another nursing home male resident come into her room.

Police said the woman, who suffered minor injuries to her face, told them no other man had entered her room.

Police said the suspect was detained for questioning and quoted him as saying, “I guess I must have hit my wife if I’m at the police station.”

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11 Comments
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According to the Asahi Shimbun, “The Kyushu region has something of a reputation for having particularly domineering or patriarchal men, often stereotyped by the term ‘Kyushu danji’ (Kyushu boys).”

https://www.asahi.com/ajw/articles/14528958

8 ( +15 / -7 )

Asiaman7 - According to the Asahi Shimbun, “The Kyushu region has something of a reputation for having particularly domineering or patriarchal men, often stereotyped by the term ‘Kyushu danji’ (Kyushu boys).”

That pretty much describes all of Japan. I've been married for seven years and my father-in-law still gives me lectures on how I should look after my wife and how I should treat her. This comes from a man who has slept in a seperate room to his wife for 30 years and the only time he speaks to her is to tell her to get him food or more ice for his shochu. TIJ!

-8 ( +17 / -25 )

Police said the suspect was detained for questioning and quoted him as saying, “I guess I must have hit my wife if I’m at the police station.”

So instead of I was drunk and I don't remember its I'm senile and I don't remember.

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

This comes from a man who has slept in a seperate room to his wife for 30 years …

Well, that arrangement has obviously worked for them for 30 years. In the U.S., one in five couples sleep in separate bedrooms, mostly because of snoring or conflicting schedules. And I would guess that committed couples in Japan are far more likely to sleep in separate beds/futons than their Western counterparts.

In fact, according to studies by Hideki Kobayashi, a graduate professor of engineering at Chiba University. 26 percent of married couples living in Tokyo-area condominiums sleep in separate rooms. Kobayashi also claims that four out of ten married couples over 60 don’t share a bed, and that 53 percent of spouses whose children have moved out prefer to sleep solo.

Kobayashi’s research was published over a decade ago, but I suspect Japanese society hasn’t changed much in this regard.

3 ( +10 / -7 )

I got lucky with my FIL, who hailed from the deep mountains of Kyushu, didn't drink or smoke, enjoyed cooking after having lost his wife to cancer, and was enormously patient with my stumbling attempts to adjust to Japanese culture. When it was his time to battle cancer, I repaid him by visiting him daily at the hospital for a year.

Point: When you marry, you marry not just your spouse but their family. Take that into serious account.

14 ( +20 / -6 )

The younger Japanese men are gradually changing this narrative of being physically abusive of their own spouse, its even more common for my male colleagues to talk about how often their own wives give them a hit when they’re pissed off and they give them a pass cause they are scared of their wives, apparently the law favors them more than their husbands, according to what they say. This is also one of the reasons why many of my older colleagues don’t want to ever consider marriage and why the others that are married don’t want to consider having a child so they could have an easier exit strategy if it does not work out. The very sanctity and role of marriage in this society has been so heavily corrupted and for the few that end up happily married with kids, they truly are the lucky ones.

7 ( +13 / -6 )

its even more common for my male colleagues to talk about how often their own wives give them a hit when they’re pissed off

Serious red flag. Not acceptable!

This is also one of the reasons why the others that are married don’t want to consider having a child so they could have an easier exit strategy if it does not work out.

Married, but cautious.

The very sanctity and role of marriage in this society has been so heavily corrupted and for the few that end up happily married with kids, they truly are the lucky ones.

So true.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

That pretty much describes all of Japan. I've been married for seven years and my father-in-law still gives me lectures on how I should look after my wife and how I should treat her. This comes from a man who has slept in a seperate room to his wife for 30 years and the only time he speaks to her is to tell her to get him food or more ice for his shochu. TIJ!

Actually, my father-in-law is more the laid back kind of guy, kind of like Cleo Huxtable from the Cosby Show. He doesn't really lecture. It' his wife who does all the lecturing and very long winded, which gets on my nerves.

Back on topic, well, I guess he couldn't remember what he did. That's assault, which is against the law.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

 “I guess I must have hit my wife if I’m at the police station.”

I guess…….moron

Kyushu danji

oh, the jokers with “male high pride?”

the “male high pride” thing is such a joke. I guess it’s a nicer way call someone an “a-hole.”

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Asiaman7

This comes from a man who has slept in a seperate room to his wife for 30 years …

Well, that arrangement has obviously worked for them for 30 years. In the U.S., one in five couples sleep in separate bedrooms, mostly because of snoring or conflicting schedules. And I would guess that committed couples in Japan are far more likely to sleep in separate beds/futons than their Western counterparts.

In fact, according to studies by Hideki Kobayashi, a graduate professor of engineering at Chiba University. 26 percent of married couples living in Tokyo-area condominiums sleep in separate rooms. Kobayashi also claims that four out of ten married couples over 60 don’t share a bed, and that 53 percent of spouses whose children have moved out prefer to sleep solo. 

Kobayashi’s research was published over a decade ago, but I suspect Japanese society hasn’t changed much in this regard.

So what?

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Been married over 37 years, we have been sleeping separately for maybe 30. Suits us both perfectly!

She loves the room hotter than hell, me I sleep damn near nude, with the AC on and a fan blowing on me, from February or so, until December, then it's just the fan!

Never understood why if people are uncomfortable sleeping together, just because it's tradition, continue to due so.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

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