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8 nations sign anti-counterfeiting treaty in Tokyo

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Noooooo i need my downloads to survive in this country!!

1 ( +4 / -4 )

The accord states that “the proliferation of counterfeit and pirated foods, as well as services that distribute infringing materials undermines legitimate trade and sustainable development of the world economy.

overcome financial/economic crisis...original products will sell like hotcakes and countries manufacturing counterfeit products will go bankrupt !

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It is so funny that CHINA was completely absent from this ANTI COUNTERFEITING meeting here in Tokyo, maybe the so called communist in power were too busy or afraid of radiation from Fukushima?? Maybe the rest of the modern world should just take these meetings straight to China?? You know so the Chinese communists can not come up with excuses for not attending this important meeting, almost everything in the world is already MADE IN CHINA and the Chinese also want to control the fake stuff too?? Geez! Talk about greedy!

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Good point some14some.

"overcome financial/economic crisis...original products will sell like hotcakes and countries manufacturing counterfeit products will go bankrupt !".

Countries like China won't go bankrupt though. They will continue to profit from their counterfeiting to the countries that still want to buy them and also profit more from selling the legit goods which as we all know, are mostly made in China.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

No more counterfeit goods? The poor kids in Philly are going to be upset, No more fake Louis Vuitton kids, 5 shops in Chinatown are gonna close.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

It's meaningless, unless China signs the ACTA.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Exactly as crazyjoe has said, it means nothing without china being party to this

2 ( +2 / -0 )

EE.

Add in Thailand too.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I hope this doesn't include Mao watches. If I ever go to China it will be the first thing I'll buy.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

...signed a treaty in Tokyo on Saturday to fight counterfeit and pirated goods, saying their proliferation hurts economic growth and helps organized crime.

More hypocrisy ... It's ok for the privately-owned central banks like the Fed, BOJ, ECB etc to issue counterfeit money and profit from it but when the plebs try the same (printing up cash, pirating goods, whatever) it becomes a criminal offence.

The politicians who are in the pay of the bankers and corporations create legislation to punish anyone who is a potential competitor to them but the big banks and corporations are protected. That's where the REAL organised crime is, at the top.

We need to return to common law (or something similar), not the corporate law we currently have which only benefits the establishment.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Without the selfish and self-centered China signing, it is meaningless.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

counterfiting is a big part of the chinese tradition thats why they won't sign it

0 ( +3 / -3 )

We should also ask ourselves why so many counterfeit products are out there. Our materialistic society considers the acquisition of wealth and power to be the goal of life, the more wealth and power you possess, the more "successful" you are considered to be. If you are materially poor, you are considered a failure in life, whereas if you are wealthy and powerful (regardless of how you acquired such wealth and power), you are considered a great success.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

It's a double edged sword. On one end false copies of a product are being made especially in China where for example mocked Apple products are made and people profit off this and must be stopped. On the other hand how ever making the practice outright illegal under international treaties makes the stolen product that much more profitable because of the added on risk which must be priced unto the counterfeit. Which ensures the livelihood of such a practice, and that is the Govt unintended consequence of this treaty, counterfeiting products is really something that can't be stopped.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Great move, but enforcing it is a big challenge. It's about time we need to do something.

FYI, I bought "Ajitsuke Nori" Yamamotoyama brand the other day from Oriental store here in US without checking carefully, but it was a fake Yamamotoyama made in China. . It was not even close to real ones and I threw it away. Dahhh......

0 ( +0 / -0 )

counterfiting is a big part of the chinese tradition thats why they won't sign it

Probably true. The Chinese government may realize that counterfeiting should be eradicated but it will have a huge problem trying to convince the nation. I hear from my acquaintances who visit China regularly that people are surprised when the subject comes up. They don't seem to comprehend the concept of patents and copyright.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Why would China sign a treaty against the essence if things. They make things! Doesn't matter whether or not it was made by someone else first. As long as they can replicate success, to make it look like their own, it's ok with them. Anyways, I applaud S. Korea for jumping in on this too. There was a plethora of fake goods all over the place when I went.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

South Korea? Really? South Korea is known for having extremely high quality counterfeit handbags.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

South Korea? Really? South Korea is known for having extremely high quality counterfeit handbags.

Try to bring one into Japan, it'll be confiscated and forget about the 'extremely high quality'.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

presto345: "I hear from my acquaintances who visit China regularly that people are surprised when the subject comes up. They don't seem to comprehend the concept of patents and copyright."

Patents and copyrights were introduced long ago by the establishment to protect their monopolies and to ensure their control over people continued. People in the West (especially) have been brainwashed through the media to believe that copyright and the pirating of goods is a crime. But who does it really hurt when some Asian counterfeiting outfit decides to pirate DVDs, Louis Vuitton handbags or Rolex watches?

On a related note, it was in the 1400s to the 1600s and onwards that the Gutenberg printing press was invented and its influence spread. The printing press brought big problems for the establishment of the day through the spread of information about how the Catholic Church was deceiving people. Through the printed word the average person could at last compare the Bible vs the Church's word and see the truth. This initially led to the Reformation and Protestantism (protest) and it changed society for the better in a big way.

Getting back to copyright and patents, the establishment created these legal mechanisms after the printing press had already been invented to try to protect their doctrines so that they could continue their suppression of information and control of people as much as possible. Unfortunately for them the free-flow of information which the Gutenberg press provided led to the opening up in almost every aspect of society; the British parliament was established, religious movements started and people became freer and more innovative.

Like in the old days, this treaty signed in Tokyo to "fight" counterfeit and pirated goods seems to be just another one of the establishment's efforts to reign in people's freedom created in large part by the runaway Internet "reformation".

-3 ( +2 / -5 )

The idea that 'rights holders' lose from pirating is a bit misleading. Artists might lose some royalties, but they don't lose anything much from lack of sales because they were given a contracted amount. They still make heaps in terms of concerts and/or appearances, signings, etc. It's the 'middle-man', or production companies, that lose, and hence the pressure on governments to do something about it. iTunes had the right idea by introducing a system in which you could buy the song without buying the album, to which the production companies all objected (save one, which then made MASSIVE profits, after which the others quickly reversed their stance and followed suit), but then for protectionist purposes it became impossible to download from iTunes products available in nations outside the one in which you reside, as is now the case with Amazon and other online companies (for things like music, movies, software at the very least).

That is to say, the more they try to crack down on pirating and protect protectionism, the larger the problem becomes as a result. They're addressing the problem via the wrong means. It'll net them more criminals, but that's all.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

" It is so funny that CHINA was completely absent from this ANTI COUNTERFEITING meeting here in Tokyo"

.......................................................................

At least China is " honest " about the issue. How about South Korea, one of the nations who signed the agreement? Have you checked Itaewon district in Seoul lately ?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Wow! Glad my China comment was picked up and ran with here by so many posting here! Too bad our Chinese amigos have not yet come out of the wood work to defend their motherland right or wrong?? I guess except for weedkila? But he English too good to be real Chinese?? Or I could be wrong but anyway I do think we are all hipocrites because how many of download illegal MP3 music and movies etc?????????????????????

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

You don't understand... Thousands of people will be in the jail... Maybe even me. Just because they watched licenseless movie!

I really hope this crap will bury itself. To understand, what the hell is ACTA, go here: http://www.stopacta.info/

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Itaewon is full of fake leather bags and many other types of goods it's nearly as bad as temple street in hong kong

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Elbuda,

I don't necessarily support the Chinese (or anyone else) counterfeiting goods. My intention was to place the spotlight were it belongs -- on the double standards and manipulation at play. The powers-that-be, via the politicians, have enacted this treaty to control counterfeiting, but like I said in my first post, it is they who are the biggest counterfeiters through the issuance of fiat money.

This Tokyo treaty to prosecute these relatively small-time counterfeiting operations, while seemingly noble and good, is really the big guy protecting his turf.

I agree with Arthur Dumbolov's comment and Smithinjapan's post also alluded to it. It's the usual business of reigning in people's rights in an attempt to criminalise the public for the smallest things. For what it's worth this new law won't work and is just a sign of desperation.

Furthermore, if the big counterfeiting operation didn't exist (ie: bankers issuing fiat money) then it's likely that the small time counterfeiting operations would be much less of a problem since the dog-eat-dog world we have now (or manufactured scarcity) wouldn't really exist and people wouldn't have to resort to counterfeiting as a means to get by. Just my 2 cents worth.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

It seems that this treaty is aimed more at stopping internet piracy rather than counterfeit goods.

I think that they are really trying to save a dying beast, however. Times have changed and the life of CDs, DVDs and even Blueray is coming to an end. I'm sure that medium will be around for quite some time, but the emerging technology of the internet will radically change the way people rent and watch movies and listen to music. Even read books is different with Kindle, iPad and other equipment out there.

Counterfeit is a different thing altogether though, and I don't know why they are lumping it in with piracy. Imitating a famous brand and trying to pass it off as such is different than someone just copying an original product.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hey Weedkila, Interestingly, I agree with you. But just wanted to add that the concept of "movable type" was first introduced by the Chinese, long before ye olde printing press. Perhaps this is payback for what Gutenburg ripped off of them.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

ExportExpert: When was the last time you were in Itaewon? All those stands on the street have disappeared.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

ExportExpert: When was the last time you were in Itaewon? All those stands on the street have disappeared...........................

you can get any movies on DVD for 2.50. After 10 dvd purchase, you get 0ne free.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Imagine, ACTA began to act; you pass the border of the USA. Customs.

Cop(C): Do you have any digital storage devices?

You(Y): Yes, a notebook.

C: Turn it on, please.

Y: "turns on a notebook"

C: Let me check your notebook for non-allowed content "inserts searching device into USB port"

Y: Non-allowed content? What is this?

C: Illegal music, videos, e-books. "ding" Have a look please. What is this?

Y: Well, this is my purchased album of "The Offspring".

C: Did you really purchased it?

Y: Yes, I did.

C: How can you prove it?

Y: Uhhh, I don't know, I purchased it with my credit card.

C: Do you have confirmation email?

Y: Confirmation email? click click scroll No, I deleted it.

C: Come with me to the police station. You are under arrest. You have the right to remain silence.

Y: Shit...

So, your goal was: business meeting or business trip. Outcome: 10 years in prison.

Viva la ACTA. All glory to corporations.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

The treaty is a start but as some of you have pointed out we need everyone on board, including the big players such as China & Russia. With pirated music, software & film products, there is a digital generation of young people growing up who has never paid for any such items. Why is that?

0 ( +2 / -2 )

there is a digital generation of young people growing up who has never paid for any such items

You're talking about this like this is something bad. Seriously, it's in our genes to share information. This can't be stopped by any means, laws or rules. People are smart enough to find what they want, even if it's against the rules.

Digital content is just bunch of code, zeros and ones, and if it's not original file, but a copy, it should cost nothing. Copying was made for copying, without copying there would be no progress at all.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Weedkila, thank you for some excellent posts.

In my opinion come of the biggest counterfeiters are the companies that the regulations are trying to protect.

Many large food companies fall into this category. Many people people would consider much of the beer sold in the world by big companies not to be real beer. A Japanese and some American companies spring to mind when I think of a rubbery substance sold as cheese. "Orange" juice should refer to the fruit and not the colour. What is "instant coffee"? Calling that product coffee again must refer only to the colour as there is little similarity to the real product. What about mayonnaise that is not made of eggs, olive oil and wine vinegar as it should be?

Next consider the brand names. Many of them sell us a product produced in a developing country in near slave labour conditions as a highly prized and priced product of France, Italy or some other country with all the profits going to a huge corporate organisation based in the developed world.

I am sure this legislation will do nothing to protect the weak, the small company, the individual designer or inventor, and everything it can to protect the strong and rich, not to mention some monopolies.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Weedkila, thank you for some excellent posts.

In my opinion come of the biggest counterfeiters are the companies that the regulations are trying to protect.

Many large food companies fall into this category. Many people people would consider much of the beer sold in the world by big companies not to be real beer. A Japanese and some American companies spring to mind when I think of a rubbery substance sold as cheese. "Orange" juice should refer to the fruit and not the colour. What is "instant coffee"? Calling that product coffee again must refer only to the colour as there is little similarity to the real product. What about mayonnaise that is not made of eggs, olive oil and wine vinegar as it should be?

Next consider the brand names. Many of them sell us a product produced in a developing country in near slave labour conditions as a highly prized and priced product of France, Italy or some other country with all the profits going to a huge corporate organisation based in the developed world.

When it comes to computer software, it seems it is in many cases not even possible to buy it. You think you have bought it and then after you purchase it, you find, if you read that small print, that it does not even belong to you: You just have a license to use it on one computer. Also, if you open the packet, you automatically agree to predatory terms. You can even install use it unless you agree to such terms. "Press Agree to Continue"

I am sure this legislation will do nothing to protect the weak, the small company, the individual designer or inventor, and everything it can to protect the strong and rich, not to mention some monopolies.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I think this story fits the Business news, rather than Crime.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Even if the Chinese sign it, they will not do anything about it.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Increase of fake Louis Vuitton bags

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@gaijintraveller

In my opinion come of the biggest counterfeiters are the companies that the regulations are trying to protect.

Good to see some others agree. Not only is the treaty about protecting the corporations, it's also about the oppression of people's rights. In a way, it's Orwellian.

One similar example to this anti-counterfeiting treaty might be seen with "Climate Change." You only have to look at the way the carbon tax (theft) has been forcefully imposed in some countries to see we're not in a democracy. Or those petty laws to protect us from global warming but which are really designed to oppress everyone through the use of smart meters or by making mercury lamps mandatory etc.

Meanwhile the corporations/banks set up business to profit from the government's treaties and regulations through their carbon trading schemes (failed, fortunately), wind farms, hybrid vehicles and so on. And it's all based on a spurious claim that the world is going to hell through "climate change."

So why shouldn't this extend to something like the anti-counterfeiting treaty where once again the corporations/globalists control the market and rip off the public? This new treaty gives them yet another reason to crack down and criminalise anyone who goes astray in the smallest of ways.

With the globalists chomping at the bit to get their dysfunctional NWO up and running, like the global warming scam, this treaty is yet another step in their goal of total control. Not that it'll work.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Can't wait for my next trips to Hong Kong and 'Nam where I can stock up on $1 DVDs, CDs and another OMEGA watch... just love bargain shopping!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Alright, for people who minused me: some nations are genuinely have no money or possibility to buy book, game or music/film in digital format. I myself bought HL2, Ep1, Ep2 and Portal in Steam. And some music. That's it. Most people in my country don't pay even for that.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Torrents are good when there are a lot of seeds.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

oberstOct. 02, 2011 - 04:46PM JST

" It is so funny that CHINA was completely absent from this ANTI COUNTERFEITING meeting here in Tokyo"

.......................................................................

At least China is " honest " about the issue. How about South Korea, one of the nations who signed the agreement? Have you checked Itaewon district in Seoul lately ?

.......................................................................

wtfftwOct. 02, 2011 - 12:55PM JST

South Korea? Really? South Korea is known for having extremely high quality counterfeit handbags.

.......................................................................

Is like letting the fox take care of the henhouse. From Korea it is not surprising.korea fake!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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