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crime

80-year-old man arrested after attacking his daughter with machete

14 Comments

Police in Tokai, Ibaraki Prefecture, have arrested an 80-year-old man on suspicion of attempted murder after he attacked his 55-year-old daughter with a machete at his home.

According to police, the incident occurred at around 7 a.m. on Wednesday, Sankei Shimbun reported. Police said Hiroshi Sugita is accused of slashing his daughter’s head with a machete. The woman ran outside and collapsed on the ground.

A neighbor called 110 and said a man was holding a machete and standing over a woman on the ground.

The woman was taken to hospital and police said her injury is not life-threatening.

Police said the victim lives in Kashiwazaki City, Niigata Prefecture. She had been staying with her father while her mother was in hospital.

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14 Comments
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The woman was taken to hospital and police said her injury is not life-threatening.

She still survived? Despite being attacked by using machete?

-11 ( +2 / -13 )

How do you NOT die after getting slashed in the head with a machete?

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

How do you NOT die after getting slashed in the head with a machete?

80 year old men probably can’t swing hard enough to do enough damage with one hit. It sounds like from the article he only hit her once. I’m glad she’s okay

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Being slashed by a machete is not like being shot in the head with a gun. If the man swung straight down with it and buried it in her head, then she would have probably died. She was "slashed", which could have been a glancing blow. I know because I carry a machete with me everywhere I go for safety reasons. In all these years I've only cut my own finger. Man, I keep it sharp. That's why I also always carry some Band-Aids.

-3 ( +5 / -8 )

Sounds like a hatchet job to me.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Sometimes my daughter annoys me, but this sounds like he lost it. Luckily he went no further. Hoping they both learnt something.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Sounds like he has lost his marbles

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Bad translation. I seriously doubt it was a machete. I'll bet it was a Nata which is fairly common in rural areas.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Senile

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Bad translation. I seriously doubt it was a machete. I'll bet it was a Nata which is fairly common in rural areas.

The news articles in Japanese identify the weapon as a nata, but I would not call the translation bad, just less precise for the sake of simplicity.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

There is usually a hammer-like protrusion on the end of the blade of a nata. This could have made the action less of a slash and more of a blunt object attack.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

…was taken to hospital and police said her injury is not life-threatening.

This is a commonly used expression by Japan Today writers for any person who survives an attack! The reality is far from the expression! Maybe it’s a non-native English language issue which they can’t comprehend and apply properly.

If you browse through any article related to violence and attacks, you will come across the above expression ( if the person survives ) or just one expression confirming death! Lack of writing skills probably!

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The standard police/hospital language is 命に別状ない inochi ni betsujo nai, or the person is stable, their life is not in danger, it's not a life or death situation. Most translation websites out there do bring up 'their injury is not life-threatening', however.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

virusrexMay 23  11:59 am JST

Bad translation. I seriously doubt it was a machete. I'll bet it was a Nata which is fairly common in rural areas.

The news articles in Japanese identify the weapon as a nata, but I would not call the translation bad, just less precise for the sake of simplicity.

I would call it a bad translation. A Nata and Machete are both bladed tools but designed for different purposes, hence the differences in blade shape, length, thickness and appearance. But then I occasionally do translation work, so I don't accept inaccurate translations for the sake of "simplicity". Especially in a news article where "less precise" means inaccurate.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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