crime

87-year-old woman arrested for abandoning ailing ex-husband to die

17 Comments

Police in Nagoya have arrested an 87-year-old woman on suspicion of abandoning her 89-year-old ex-husband at home while his health deteriorated to the point where he died last month.

According to police, Kazuko Ichikawa has been charged with negligence as a guardian resulting in death, Kyodo News reported. Police said Ichikawa has denied the charge and quoted her as saying, “I never left my ex-husband unattended.”

Although the couple were divorced, they had been living together since 2008. Police have learned that Ichikawa’s ex-husband, Satoshi Sugino, was vomiting and collapsed on the floor of their apartment at around 4:30 p.m. on Nov 20. Instead of seeking medical assistance, Ichikawa allegedly allowed her ex-husband’s health to deteriorate and he died from an unspecified illness on Nov 26.

The incident came to light after a neighbor contacted police to report that something suspicious seemed to be going on in the apartment.

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17 Comments
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That poor woman. Who was there to help her?

16 ( +18 / -2 )

Easy to point fingers and lay the blame on the woman here, yet this is just a sign of more to come as more and more elderly need assistance, and the government is ill equipped nor seemingly cares to do anything about the problem.

6 ( +14 / -8 )

heartbreaking

10 ( +11 / -1 )

So much unknown in the article.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Police said Ichikawa has denied the charge and quoted her as saying, “I never left my ex-husband unattended.

She must've been doing all she can to take care of him. You can't find them like that anymore. Divorced since 2008 and she still stayed to take care of her ex husband? Wow! Kudos to her!

5 ( +8 / -3 )

How do they know that she abandoned him? Not calling an ambulance and abandonment are different. Unless he vomited and collapsed because she poisoned him, what are they arresting her for? Is not seeking medical attention for someone and then dying from natural causes an arrestable offense? The woman is almost 90. Maybe she really didn’t think it was serious. Unless they suspect something more, it seems strange.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Here we have someone who has denied the charges against them, but there is no "allegedly" in the article title before the crime - yet Japan Today often uses that word for crime articles even when the criminal has confessed to the crime. Why is it missing here? Guilty until proven innocent?

Also, I note that here is an elderly person who did not kill the elderly partner in her care. A partner she was not even married to any longer, and yet she was still taking care of him. Imagine that, and then think about all those other stories we have heard recently where the partner got "fed up" with caring for his elderly partner, and murdered them because of it. Shaking my head....

4 ( +5 / -1 )

very sad ending of life....

1 ( +1 / -0 )

divorced! Sounds weird she would be liable just being an ex-wife, unless any of us should have called the ambulance as a third party.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

How do they know that she abandoned him? Not calling an ambulance and abandonment are different. Unless he vomited and collapsed because she poisoned him, what are they arresting her for? Is not seeking medical attention for someone and then dying from natural causes an arrestable offense? The woman is almost 90. Maybe she really didn’t think it was serious. Unless they suspect something more, it seems strange.

Exactly! I was expecting to read that she left the house/apartment for a long period of time without food or medicine in hopes that upon her return, he would have expired. But its FAR from the case! Another case based on what the police "think" happened, thus resulting in another wrongful judgement. As she said :  “I never left my ex-husband unattended.” I hope his spirit returns to thank her for all she has done before passing on!

0 ( +1 / -1 )

ChabbawangaToday  06:55 am JST

That poor woman. Who was there to help her?

Maybe the ambulance service?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Guilty until proven innocent?

In Japan, you pretty much have to prove your innocence when dealing with the police.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

divorced! Sounds weird she would be liable just being an ex-wife, unless any of us should have called the ambulance as a third party.

Why? It's not as weird as it may sound to you. I know of quite a few elderly who are divorced but still living together.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"divorced! Sounds weird she would be liable just being an ex-wife, unless any of us should have called the ambulance as a third party."

Yubaru - Why? It's not as weird as it may sound to you. I know of quite a few elderly who are divorced but still living together.

I've known a number of non-elderly who have done it, as well, including myself with my 1st wife for a short time.

The reasons for such arrangements are usually financial and/or children-related.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Alex - Here we have someone who has denied the charges against them, but there is no "allegedly" in the article title before the crime - yet Japan Today often uses that word for crime articles even when the criminal has confessed to the crime. Why is it missing here? Guilty until proven innocent?

Nowhere does it state that she committed the crime. It only reports what the police have arrested her for, and the charges being assessed:

*"Police in Nagoya have arrested an 87-year-old woman on suspicion of abandoning her 89-year-old ex-husband..." *

*"According to police, Kazuko Ichikawa has been charged with negligence as a guardian..."*

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Anyone who knows anything about the Japanese justice system knows that this case will never go to trial. People who are saying that there is no help are talking nonsense. If she was able, all she needed to do was pick up a phone and call an ambulance.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

yet this is just a sign of more to come as more and more elderly need assistance, and the government is ill equipped nor seemingly cares to do anything about the problem.

I live in a community with many elderly people. Japan supports them quite well. I see it every day, perhaps some are too proud to ask for help.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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