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Lebanon receives Interpol red notice for ex-Nissan boss Ghosn

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Interpol itself actually has no arrest powers. They are a private organization with the same arrest powers as your local community association of Sunday park cleaners.

Interpol serves as a clearing house for international arrests. For example if the Tokyo police were to issue an arrest warrant, Interpol confirms its authenticity and then forwards it to whatever membered police organization in the recipient country. Who then follow up on the warrant.

If some Interpol person tries to arrest you, you can totally ignore them, they are not police.

33 ( +39 / -6 )

Keeping him under the strict bail conditions until April 2021 and pestering his family to make him confess to charges he denies shows two things. Firstly, it shows how corrupt and unfair the Japanese legal system is. Secondly, it shows how hopeless the prosecuting lawyers are. They need nearly two years to prepare a case against him? What a load of complete hogwash! They don't have enough evidence to convict him, so they are attempting to force a confession out of him by separating him from his family and denying him any civil liberties. How low can you go Japan? Now, they expect Interpol to pull them out of their own crap. Interpol can do nothing and Lebanon will not extradite their citizens. Suck it up Japan! Your corrupted and draconian legal system has caused this and put the daft legal system on the world stage. You only have yourselves to blame!

50 ( +60 / -10 )

Flight tracking data suggests Ghosn used two different planes to fly to Istanbul and then to Lebanon.

This means he stepped on Turkish soil, but he apparently bypassed Turkish Immigration.

He broke Turkish law.

Does Turkey have an extradition treaty with Lebanon?

-13 ( +10 / -23 )

@Disillusioned

What you and many people here fail to realize is that Japan is not a common law country. Its a civil law country so therefore the role of lawyers is more along the lines of advisors. They dont prepare cases here, that is the job of the judges. The role of the judge is exponentionally more important in Japan, therefore the time is not really for preparing a case, but rather enough time for the judges to get ready to hear the case.

Due to this, what alot of people here keep spewing which is absolute hogwash, is that Ghosns lawyers dont get to see evidence before hand. Thats because they dont need to in a civil law system.

Ghosn is literally screwed here. He cant leave Lebanon or other friendly states. A red notice by interpol will compel most signatories to arrest him when he lands there. Then extradited to Japan where is 100% a criminal now, of he wasnt before. I also wouldnt put it past Japan to request a red notice for his wife, if they have enough evidence to think ahe could be involved in aidimg and abetting a fugitive she can now be arrested and extradited to Japan. Putting pressure of Ghosn to give himself up. He literally handed japan a new deck of cards!

-12 ( +18 / -30 )

Wow! Things are really heating up. Japan is mad.

16 ( +17 / -1 )

Ghosn did what any rational adult with the means would do in his situation. No way was he going to get a fair trial.

26 ( +36 / -10 )

INTERPOLE : COURTESY YOU MUST NOT REFUSE

°

Interpole ask to friends. You are an interpol friends or not. If you are not you tend to be put on a terrorist list.

Ghosn planned this for at least 3 to 6 month. The trial delay is not in cause. His attitude was. His family is banned for everything like his friends. This is an interpol ban and this is the red terrorist ban one.

France is still holiday sleeping. But, this is bad. We are not sure this is the real Carlos Ghosn since he was using a twin man probably going with his second passport for alibi (i expect bad sheet going back to light since his alibis all failed now).

Note : he stole the french passeport from a locked suitcase belonging to his attorney. He travelled with fake stolen paper according to international law even in Lebanon. It is important on long term diplomacy.

°

NadAge

-28 ( +3 / -31 )

So, Lebanon may opt to seize his passport and set bail. We know how effective that is. ''Now go away or I shall taunt you a second time'

9 ( +10 / -1 )

Smart Ghosn will be missing again.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Chip Star, you call it rational ? No joking ? Just freedom of expression ? even stupid expression ?

-13 ( +3 / -16 )

All sound and fury for the public's consumption. He won't be going anywhere and the Japanese govt knows that.

17 ( +19 / -2 )

pestering his family 

Pestering poor kid Anthony about Shogun Investments and mysterious millons that got there. The Ghosnophiles will worship no matter what.

 Interpol person ....they are not police.

Interpol is just the police.

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

Ghosn is literally screwed here. He cant leave Lebanon or other friendly states. A red notice by interpol will compel most signatories to arrest him when he lands there. 

Given that France has said that it would not extradite him (and anyway has no extradition treaty with Japan), he can happily travel between those two countries. Many people lead rich and fulfilling lives without ever leaving those countries.

20 ( +23 / -3 )

@Burning Bush,

This means he stepped on Turkish soil, but he apparently bypassed Turkish Immigration.

He broke Turkish law.

Not necessarily true.

You have heard of transiting, yes?

For example, you can fly into Narita and if you are transferring to a flight to another country, you do NOT go through immigration.

So, just because Ghosn traveled via Turkey does NOT mean he had to go through Turkish immigration.

25 ( +27 / -2 )

This means he stepped on Turkish soil, but he apparently bypassed Turkish Immigration.

He broke Turkish law.

I don't get your logic, Burning Bush. He arrived in Turkey on a French passport and presumably changed planes and departed in the same French passport. Nothing against the law about that as far as I'm aware.

If he did not change planes using the approved channels that worked be a breach of the law, but I doubt Turkey is going to kick up a diplomatic row with a neighbour over the issue.

16 ( +16 / -0 )

Given that France has said that it would not extradite him

He is wanted by French prosecutors too. He did not even like living France when he was free and had all the money and power, so I doubt he'd find his life fullfilling in "La Santé".

-5 ( +6 / -11 )

My best guess the responses to any questioning would go something like this:

Four pilots response: I just flew the plane, that is my job. Sure, sure I looked and greeted the passengers but you see one guy you seen them all. I fly planes.

Airport ground staff: Hey, I guided the plane at loading tarmac, that's my job, don't care about who is getting on board.

Cargo Worker: Hey man, I just load the bags, Just doing my job, don't know about who is on plane, not my job.

19 ( +19 / -0 )

You have heard of transiting, yes?

He stepped off the plane, onto the ground and into another plane.

You can transit through secure areas within an airport, provided that the airline provides a manifest of the people who are transiting and you are on that manifest along with your passport number.

If you try to exit the secure area of the airport and step onto the ground you must show a passport, because the ground is not part of the official airport transit zone.

Not only did his airline fail to list his name on the manifest, they allowed him to exit the plane without submitting him to Turkish Immigration control.

They broke Turkish law.

-1 ( +11 / -12 )

They broke Turkish law.

Which Turkish law? Are you familiar with Turkish law?

12 ( +17 / -5 )

If you try to exit the secure area of the airport and step onto the ground you must show a passport,

Not us, French people. We enter and leave Turkey without a passport, any ID with a photo will do. It's even a huge issue that Turkey has let all those jihadi teens pass and go to Syria.

Turkey has arrested the team that worked on the trip not about their domestic laws. It's because they are suspects of organizing criminal a escape that is breaking Japanese laws. It's an Interpol request by Japan.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Which Turkish law? Are you familiar with Turkish law?

Your right, I'm haven't read the entire Turkish civil code.

I assume Turkey requires all foreign nationals to present a passport upon entering the country.

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

If you try to exit the secure area of the airport and step onto the ground you must show a passport, because the ground is not part of the official airport transit zone.

The article didn't actually say that he didn't do this. He might have illegally changed planes, but the article provides no comment on this, so you must be using another source.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Can't. wait to see the movie!

7 ( +7 / -0 )

I tend to side with Carlos considering there is no convincing evidence of guilt disclosed yet AND his Japanese executive agent, SAIKAWA, was NOT arrested.

8 ( +12 / -4 )

Carlos Ghosn is not your hero. Before his flight, he was a criminal suspect. Now he’s a common criminal who broke the law by skipping bail. Absence of extradition treaties Is not a problem. There’s none between Japan and Brazil, but the Brazilian authorities extradite Brazilian criminal suspects at the request of the Japanese government.

-8 ( +9 / -17 )

mrbaberunee

Can't. wait to see the movie!

Roughly a week before Ghosn made it to Beirut, he was cheerfully discussing a possible movie version of his life with a mega-Hollywood producer in his Tokyo home.

https://www.thedailybeast.com/nissan-ceo-carlos-ghosns-great-escape-writes-a-hollywood-ending-to-japanese-imprisonment?ref=author

2 ( +3 / -1 )

What Interpol issues are not actually arrest warrants, they are diplomatic requests for assistance in apprehending or detaining individuals - they have no legally binding force.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

@Kentarogaijin,

I KNOW IT !!, I TOLD YOU EVERYBODY !!.. INTERPOL WILL DO ANYTHING TO TAKE BACK THAT CRIMINAL TO JAPAN, PATIENCE, PATIENCE, JUSTICE WILL BE SERVED!!..

I think you need to familiarise yourself with Interpol and its Red Notices.

From the INTERPOL web site regarding Red Notices:

Are the individuals wanted by INTERPOL?

No, they are wanted by a country or an international tribunal.

INTERPOL cannot compel the law enforcement authorities in any country to arrest someone who is the subject of a Red Notice.

Each member country decides what legal value it gives to a Red Notice and the authority of their law enforcement officers to make arrests.

So, the only way Ghosn is going back is if Lebanon decides to arrest him and arrange with Japan to send him back.

And since there is no extradition treaty, it won't happen. Well, not unless Japan tries to bribe Lebanon. With, say, a few billion US$.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

https://annozijlstra.wordpress.com/2020/01/03/case-ghosn-japanese-lost-face-with-her-unfair-justice-system/

Japanese lost face with her unfair justice system, pressed suspects until they confess, hold on for years, prohibit contact with their loved ones, all out of pure jealousy. We know Japan from the time they had occupied the Netherlands Indie now Indonesia, I can actually laugh about the Renault CEO's escape. Forget about coming back to Japan.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Lebanon does not extradite its citizens to foreign states.

The Japanese government is going to make a lot of noise about it but they do exactly the same...

5 ( +7 / -2 )

what did I say? what did I say? he even dragged Turkey into this mess.

This moron just made Japanese prosecutors job hundred times easier. LOL

ofc he can hide in Lebanon if the latter government choose to openly shield a criminal.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

One of the operatives was a former Marine employed by a U.S. security firm while the second worked for a Lebanese firm, Kyodo said.

make sure these two are held accountable as well

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

What you and many people here fail to realize is that Japan is not a common law country. Its a civil law country so therefore the role of lawyers is more along the lines of advisors. They dont prepare cases here, that is the job of the judges. The role of the judge is exponentionally more important in Japan, therefore the time is not really for preparing a case, but rather enough time for the judges to get ready to hear the case.

Due to this, what alot of people here keep spewing which is absolute hogwash, is that Ghosns lawyers dont get to see evidence before hand. Thats because they dont need to in a civil law system.

So, this makes little sense to me. What is the use of a defense or prosecuting lawyer and how does a person get a fair trial, if they don't make a case and the judge sides with guilty judgment 99% of the time? With a 99% conviction rate, this idea of judges being the reason it takes time to make a case exacerbates the idea there is no fair trial, in Japan. It follows that it is not just reasonable, but logical that Ghosn fled the egregious Japanese justice system.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I am sure that the right wingers in this forum are flaming in anger.

It burns to be world wide ashamed and put such an archaic system in scrutiny.

Now we will see if Japan will prefer to follow the west style democracy or the Chinese North Korean style in justice and freedom.

Only time will tell.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

I am enjoying every bit of this story.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

So, the only way Ghosn is going back is if Lebanon decides to arrest him and arrange with Japan to send him back. 

And since there is no extradition treaty, it won't happen. Well, not unless Japan tries to bribe Lebanon. With, say, a few billion US$.

I agree with the top paragraph. I disagree with the second paragraph.

The assumption is that a treaty is absolutely required and that arrest and extradition can only take place under a treaty. Not true.

The scenario would be no extradition treaty but extradition on a case by case basis. This case is big enough to stand on its own with or without a treaty.

Country A and Country B do not have a bilateral trade agreement but that doesn’t mean goods are not traded between the two countries.

That said IMO Lebanon will not arrest their own son and hand him over to Japan to be put into the vipers pit but they can regardless of whether there is an extradition agreement or not.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Japan was afraid of the negative publicity of the trial. Ghosn just took that blew it up exponentially. There will be more publicity of the legal system of Japan than ever.

Now we will see if Japan will prefer to follow the west style democracy or the Chinese North Korean style in justice and freedom.

Japan is duplicitous by nature. Democratic Tatemae but authoritarian Honne. If you’re generous, Japan is going through a identity crisis but the feudalistic, hierarchical, Confucian authoritative nature has always been and will be inherent in government and society.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

If Lebanon wants to they could trade all Lebanese being held in immigration detention for Carlos. But I think that won't happen. Japan needs to move on, Lebanon has said they will not hand him over. The Turks are making a show to appease the Japanese, they could really care less. It's a done deal.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

He's not coming back to Japan. Good for him!

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Here's the Guardian UK article from 5 hours ago

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/jan/02/japan-issues-interpol-wanted-notice-for-carlos-ghosn

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Plus 5 hours..edit button please JP lol!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Japan needs to move on, Lebanon has said they will not hand him over. 

OK, he won't be extradited. But the different countries, Japan included, can demand that the assets bought with Nissan-Renault's money get seized. Lebanese authorities have already started cooperating last year by transmitting to Japan the archives of late lawyer Fadi Gebran. If Ghosn loses most of his wealth and properties, and gets stuck in a country half the size of Tokyo, his victory will have a bitter after-taste.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Given that France has said that it would not extradite him (and anyway has no extradition treaty with Japan), he can happily travel between those two countries.

Nope since France is associated with INTERPOL, Ghosn will be arrested and held for trial in France under French laws based on the allegations brought up by the Japanese prosecutors.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I am enjoying every bit of this story... Saikawa must have ants in his pants right now!!!

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Washington Post’s new angle.

A group of lawyers on Thursday lodged a complaint with Lebanon’s judiciary charging that visits he made to Israel in his position as chairman of Renault and later Nissan constitute a crime under laws forbidding citizens from interacting with Lebanon’s arch-foe, which has been in a state of war with Lebanon for the past 60 years.

That could put him in a tougher position than any charges of embezzlement or financial wrongdoing, which are the norm among elites in Lebanon’s deeply corrupt society. Collaborating with the enemy is regarded as a serious offense, potentially more serious than the charges the former Nissan executive was facing when he slipped out of Japan earlier this week and showed up in Beirut, expecting a warm welcome.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Triring; Nope since France is associated with INTERPOL, Ghosn will be arrested and held for trial in France under French laws based on the allegations brought up by the Japanese prosecutors.

Wrong, a Red Notice is not an arrest warrant and France refuses red notices from Interpol for countries with the death penalty. So, Japan would never get Ghosn from France either.

Interpol has no police power and are merely another toothless bunch of diplomats from the UN who advise and plead.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Nope since France is associated with INTERPOL, Ghosn will be arrested and held for trial in France under French laws based on the allegations brought up by the Japanese prosecutors.

Like many others here, including the authors of this story, you've consumed a red herring.

A Red Notice is not an arrest warrant. Interpol member countries don't have to cooperate (eg Lebanon), and like wise France might decide to not cooperate either.

A member country 'may' decide it will cooperate and provisionally arrest a wanted person. MAY, not MUST.

A Red Notice in this instance is the first step in containing Ghosn, ie he may be arrested if he enters a country that will cooperate.

Ghosn might be an untrustworthy liar and a selfish crook, but he is not dumb. He knows he will be safe in Lebanon.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

mariasjapanToday  11:33 am JST

why would he? he's comfortably sitting on Gosn's chair now :)

0 ( +0 / -0 )

quercetumToday  11:40 am JST

well he's a Brazilian, he doesn't give a rat bum about Lebanon people's misfortune

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Wrong, a Red Notice is not an arrest warrant and France refuses red notices from Interpol for countries with the death penalty. So, Japan would never get Ghosn from France either.

You are mistaken he will be indicted by the French Authorities under Fench law and will be detained in a French prison. The French prosecutors will take over all the findings from the Japanese prosecutors.

You can't actually flee from a crime you committed simply by flying to another country.

The Red notice by INTERPOL is to notify all nations of the severe allegations he faces. The reason why there is one is because most nations do not want an extradition treaty with other nations since it goes against most countries' constitution but to prosecute criminal justices is just as important so this kind of system was made .

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Just a reminder about Interpol Red notices: a certain high-profile movie producer who fled near-certain incarceration for pedophile crimes in 1977 has been under an Interpol Red notice for very many years and still lives freely in France and his native Poland though the United States has been trying to get him since 1978.

So, don't expect a detention of Ghosn anytime soon or even ever.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I think Turkey is just putting on a show to appease Japan to be honest

4 ( +6 / -2 )

The Japanese government is doing its upmost to prevent Ghosn’s attempt to stay free.

The media have not been briefed but there are are several government workers manning the offices not on holiday anymore....

0 ( +1 / -1 )

In a culture where people love and feel comfortable in a state of prolonged limbo and inaction it may be hard to comprehend Ghosns bold maneuvers and escape, but to the rest of the world fleeing from mental torcher is a forgivable offense.

“So sorry, we need another year....” the straw that broke the camels back.

One cultures narrative won’t ever match another.s. Nor is one inherently bad or worse than the other either, we just have different psychological makeups that’s all. I know personally I wouldn’t be able to stand another year not being allowed to speak to my wife, and if an opportunity arose I’d be Ghosn like the wind as well.

The anger on the ground here in Japan too must be understood. It is what it is. Different mindsets colliding.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

he stole the french passeport from a locked suitcase belonging to his attorney

He stole his own passport?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

This fool gonna be lookin' over his shoulder for ninjas for the rest of his life.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Better than being controlled and having no freedom in Japan eh?

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

So, Japan would never get Ghosn from France either

Macron is under lots of pressure from the yellow-vest protesters. The last thing he wants to do is side with a corrupt, elitist, criminal 1-percenter who stole money from French shareholders/taxpayers of Nissan and avoided paying French taxes by creating a shell company in the Netherlands.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The sources said Ghosn had grown distressed that authorities were pressuring his family to draw a confession from him after his daughter and son were questioned by Japanese prosecutors in the United States in early December.

I'm astounded that the USA allowed this.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Do people realise that Japan wanted this and probably assisted the escape. This means that Japan can forever point the finger at Ghosn being guilty without the embarrassment of a court trial under law and with a 'we told you so'.

Ghosn's trial caused embarrassment for Japan in the international spotlight. Why else do you think Japan kept delaying his court trial? Because they are concerned about their evidence and reasons for prosecution.

Now that Ghosn escaped they can play the role of the law-abiding guys and how this convict escaped.

Japan would have assisted Ghosn's escape and would have known he was en-route. You can't just get into a private jet and leave any airfield into international airspace. It's also why they left him a passport. Japan also gets to pocket around GBP10M bail money towards their costs.

It's a perfect situation for Japan.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

The role of the judge is exponentionally more important in Japan, therefore the time is not really for preparing a case, but rather enough time for the judges to get ready to hear the case.

yet judges only serve limited terms and their selection is closely linked to the justice department and prosecutors office. Can somebody please explain to me how this is fair or even just that a judge whose sole purpose is to be neutral and fair to both prosecutors and defendants yet whose position is dependant on whether the justice department thinks theyre a team player and toe the line. You can understand how that 99% conviction rate comes about, only prosecute those cases they know will be rubber stamped by these judges. Nothing to see here all above board no chance of any corrupt judges in Japan. lmfao.

If Ghosn is guilty or not is not the main point here, it whether the justice department and prosecutors would allow a high profile case like Ghosn to be lost by them on their watch. We all know Japans kryptonite is "loss of face" does anybody truly believe that Ghosn would get a fair trial here regardless of the evidence or lack of it the prosecutors may have had. With all the corporate corruption and the very little conviction and imprisonment rate of Japanese executives does anybody truly believe that 99% conviction rate is real and Japan justice is anything but fair and just!?

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Chip Star, you call it rational ? No joking ? Just freedom of expression ? even stupid expression ?

I’m not certain what you’re asking.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

I've followed this case on and off for months. It's not something that has got me too worked up (there's massive injustice everywhere, and this is only one case), but if anyone commenting here cares enough to look back at reporting on respected websites (e.g. the Atlantic), the story that emerges is that someone had it in for the guy. One or two subordinates on the rung below at Nissan? Almost certainly. With support from government/bureaucratic circles? Quite possibly. The fact is that after one attempt to send him to trial was rejected for lack of evidence, prosecutors were allowed to dig deeper into every aspect of his business history to try to find something to nail him with. This is not how justice is supposed to work in "democratic" societies.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Chip Star, "I am not certain" is the same as "not smart". Hahaha, happy new year.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

well he's a Brazilian, he doesn't give a rat bum about Lebanon people's misfortune

Hmm... It's always a good idea to check your facts before you post. He was born in Brazil to Lebanese parents, before returning with them to Lebanon at the age of 6.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hanging out for the movie, this is getting more interesting everyday.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

i,m sure he,s really worried about that “Interpol red notice”...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japan is learning all the wrong lessons from Ghosn's escape. Instead of using this to review its much criticized hostage justice system and implementing some reforms to bring it in line with international standards befitting a 21st Century developed democracy, they are talking about halting some stupid thing called "bail leniency for foreigners" whatever that means. Everyone knows there is nothing like bail leniency. Ghosn fled because he was convinced he would not receive a fair trial. You can't fault him for that. The Japanese INjustice system rampantly flouts international conventions that Japan has signed and is part of. It is inhumane, it is discriminatory, it is unjust. It needs TOTAL overhaul. It makes you wonder just how competent are Japanese prosecutors? A system that is dependent on forced confessions to derive a 99.9% conviction rate. How ridiculous.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What you and many people here fail to realize is that Japan is not a common law country. Its a civil law country so therefore the role of lawyers is more along the lines of advisors. They dont prepare cases here, that is the job of the judges.

Japan may not use common law, but like most countries, it distinguishes between criminal and civil cases. In criminal cases such as this one, it's the prosecutor that prepares the case against the accused.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So, this makes little sense to me. What is the use of a defense or prosecuting lawyer and how does a person get a fair trial, if they don't make a case and the judge sides with guilty judgment 99% of the time? With a 99% conviction rate, this idea of judges being the reason it takes time to make a case exacerbates the idea there is no fair trial, in Japan.

I suggest you look here for the difference. https://www.diffen.com/difference/Civil_Law_vs_Common_Law

The conviction rate is also a misnomer that too many people fall into the trap of believing. There are many reasons for it, but reluctance of prosecutors in Japan to bring to trial a charge that might fail, means generally only the ones they think will win get brought to trial.

Also there are many countries with a 99% conviction rate. Canada being one of them, and yet we dont complain about that.

However the majority of Ghosn defenders here conveniently leave out all logic and random nonsense. Ghosn has an obligation to abide by the legal system in the country he is doing business, whether he thinks its unfair or not. Anything other than that is naive and elitist at best.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

 it whether the justice department and prosecutors would allow a high profile case like Ghosn to be lost by them on their watch.

He was not 'on their watch'. He promised to stay and you can see...

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Maybe he should claim Asylum ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

For Japan to take so long to come up with the case against him, suggests that they are either totally inept or have made wild accusations first without any scrap of evidence sufficient to prosecute him with. In other words he is being persecuted by the State, so should be a solid enough reason for making an Asylum application.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Ghosn seems to have jumped out of frying pan straight to fire which comes from iran to lebanon or was he a just a bait for shelling

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Funding terrorism probably with the money he stole. He did run like someone who did....Hmm wifey should be charged also..

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Avibaijai: Ghosn seems to have jumped out of frying pan straight to fire which comes from iran to lebanon or was he a just a bait for shelling

I don´t understand. What are you trying to say?

Mike 1482: Funding terrorism probably with the money he stole.

Ghosn is funding terrorism? How? Can you explain?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

WilliB just wait n watch how the thing call karma unfolds bt u need to have patience to see it .

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Funding Michel Aoun for his escape to lebanon is nothing less than funding terrorism

0 ( +0 / -0 )

An Interpol "Red Notice" is just a notice that some police agency wants another police agency to be aware of something. For example, the Tokyo Police have issued an arrest warrant for Carlos Goshn. It has no power to compel anything. Lebanon can do whatever it chooses since they have no extradition treaty with Japan.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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