crime

More details emerge over Kawasaki stabbing rampage, killer

67 Comments

The requested article has expired, and is no longer available. Any related articles, and user comments are shown below.

© KYODO

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.

67 Comments
Login to comment

Dude was sick. Sad part again, one man, fell through the cracks of society, no one to look after him, no assistance with his obvious mental illness, and everyone AFTER the fact jumping on the bandwagon of his "strangeness", looking to find an excuse for his actions.

20 ( +24 / -4 )

Our prayers are for the souls of the victims.

By the way - about the reporting - why is the English translation of the criminal's words written as "I'm gonna kill you," instead of "I'm going to kill you?" Is there some idiomatic Japanese that the reporter wished to convey in English?

8 ( +13 / -5 )

This horrifying incident has made me and my wife rethink how our girls will be getting to and from their school in Tokyo and we're now taking them to and from school ourselves.

Could this be jumping the gun on our part? Maybe. But we've always considered Japan to be safe and my wife never had problems walking to school by herself throughout her ES, JHS and HS days. But this has shaken us and made us reconsider our own naivety.

8 ( +11 / -3 )

So, he was an unemployed, agoraphobic recluse with psychopathic delusions. Ding! Ding! Alarm bells go off! Get to know your neighbors people.

-3 ( +7 / -10 )

"I heard children scream 'I'm scared' and then turned to see a man with knives shouting, 'I'm gonna kill you,'" said Toshichika Ishii, 57, who was at a park near the site, adding he saw children falling to the ground.

I read this on another article earlier:

But Satoru Shitori, the deputy principal of the Caritas Elementary School, disputed this account, saying the man assaulted the children from the back of the line without saying a word. “And that’s why the children didn’t notice,” Shitori said. “They were looking toward the bus.”

As for this:

"Even if we thoroughly implement a plan, it is difficult to totally prevent crimes," said a senior education ministry official.

Yes, it's impossible to totally prevent crime, but it also depends what your definition of prevention involves. Is it only gating off school entrances or having PTA guards along prominent routes? Or does it involve a total reassessment of your mental health care system, striving to eliminate the stigma families feel if one of their own is disturbed. Whether this guy was living at home or not, surely his parents knew he was ill, likely for as long as they can remember. And how many of these guys are going to crack when their aging parents die off and no one's left to care for them.

A society that accepts such stigmatization, hiding away its mentally ill or developmentally disabled people, out of sight and out of mind, can only expect more such incidents in the future.

18 ( +20 / -2 )

Prime Minister Shinzo Abe said the government "must ensure children's safety by all means." He instructed the education minister and the chairman of the National Public Safety Commission to check on safety measures taken while elementary and junior high school students are commuting.

Is it a pledge?

How could have the government ensured the safety of the children against such a sicko.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Could this be jumping the gun on our part? Maybe. But we've always considered Japan to be safe and my wife never had problems walking to school by herself throughout her ES, JHS and HS days. But this has shaken us and made us reconsider our own naivety.

IF and I seriously may be stretching things here right now, so soon after this incident, but with this and the recent car accidents, could be the proverbial "silver-lining" in the cloud.

I give you credit for opening admitting it, and I hope parents and people throughout the country do the same as you. Admitting your own naivety about safety here is the first step, and you have taken the next one's as well, by ensuring your children's safety is your priority.

I am sorry that it took incidents like this to get you to this point, but you will sleep a little better at night knowing that you are doing the right thing!

Keep it up! Yes, Japan is a relatively safe country, yet like myself and a few others have have been saying for an awfully long time, Japan has some serious issues regarding crime, and the public is kept in the dark about all but the worst of it, as the overwhelming majority does not make the news, locally nor nationally.

There is no way to be 100% "safe", but taking common sense precautions, can help you and your children to avoid being a victim. Teaching children to develop and more importantly trust, their "6th sense" or "street smarts", paying attention to things around them, not keeping their heads in smart phones, things many of us take for granted when travelling or living in a foreign country, need to be taught to the children (and plenty of adults here as well)

2 ( +5 / -3 )

A terrifying ordeal no neighborhood should ever have. The killer is a disgrace to humanity.

My heart goes out the the victims and their families.

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Oyama, a Myanmar language interpreter, also sustained cuts to his back, which he might have received while trying to protect the children, the investigative sources said.

A hero.

Very sad.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

Never take safety for granted anywhere.

My condolences to the families.

I'd like to buy the bus driver who went after the murderer a drink and shake his hand. In my experience, running towards the threat to neutralize it is purely a reaction that some have. This man indoubtedly saved life's and should be commended for it.

As for Japanese people targeting weaker people, it shouldn't be a surprise to anyone given it's part of the culture, which is evidence by the sempai/kouhai nonsense.

9 ( +10 / -1 )

I give you credit for opening admitting it, and I hope parents and people throughout the country do the same as you. Admitting your own naivety about safety here is the first step, and you have taken the next one's as well, by ensuring your children's safety is your priority.

It will take a few more killings before they realize their country isn’t as safe as they think. The Japanese take pride in their safe society. There may not be guns, but there are plenty of knives.

-5 ( +3 / -8 )

Some who are excluded and rejected by the society come to hate the society and people. All human beings have a danger to become like him. Everybody has a trace of madness. It is a part of human nature. Cruel society produces cruel people.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

So, he was an unemployed, agoraphobic recluse with psychopathic delusions. Ding! Ding! Alarm bells go off! Get to know your neighbors people.

Indeed. Talk to them, and help them if you think they may be suffering. Don't look down on them if they are unemployed or have mental illnesses. It could happen to any one of us.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2011/04/30/national/psychiatrists-aid-traumatized-foreigners/

https://blog.gaijinpot.com/dealing-depression-japan/

8 ( +10 / -2 )

He have chosen a better way of dying alone and an inconspicuous timing. What with a foreign dignitary capping his visit with this news on peaceful Japan! And yes to the poster, we shld know our neighbors!! May the departed find peace and a better afterlife. And may the children who witnessed that carnage undergo therapy and still be positive in life!

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

I followed the news all days yesterday, and I still don't know what to say.

I can only feel terrible for the families of the victims, and for the children that will certainly suffer long time mental consequences.

The fact that the murderer will never face justice and that we will certainly never know his motive is just making it worse.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I hate to bring this up here, but imagine how much more deadly it could've been if this insane individual had had access to guns.

It still doesn't change the fact that this was a terrible and coldblooded act in and of itself.

RIP

10 ( +11 / -1 )

t will take a few more killings before they realize their country isn’t as safe as they think. The Japanese take pride in their safe society. There may not be guns, but there are plenty of knives.

Japan is one of the safest countries in the world, but that does not mean it is 100% safe.

8 ( +10 / -2 )

I hate to bring this up here, but imagine how much more deadly it could've been if this insane individual had had access to guns.

Exactly.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

This is truely a sad situation. RIP Angels. These lone wolf attacks are impossible to predict. If there are no warning signs, there will never be a way to stop these attacks, sadly. This is the world we live in now. I know someone who was in a bad marriage in Japan. and told the Dr. they were depressed. The doctor asked if she could eat, and has not hurt herself. She can eat, and did not injure herself. They said she was not depressed. The mental health system is broken. Once she cuts herself and bleeds, and does not eat, THEN they will help her, if it is not to late, and she is still alive.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

The attack suspect was NOT unemployed, but rather worked at night, returning home each morning at the time the rest of society was going to school or work. Another salient fact is that his parents divorced when he was 11 years old, and he was sent to live with distant relatives.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

A horrible crime.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Very sad story. With guns you can bring in new laws, but with knives, what should be the best course of action. Probably better identification mechanism and facilities for mentally ill seems to be the only solution. I hope such kind of thing never happens again.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

I know the school is popular and Japan is "safe" but, having an 11 year old commute from Tama city to Kawasaki by herself is absolutely ridiculous...That's an hour and 10 min, plus a walk to the bus station, wait, and a bus ride (not sure how long that is)...

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The more we learn about Iwasaki's difficult life experiences in the past the less we can be surprised by the shocking explosion of his inner rage and resentment of humankind which had been brewing for 40+ years. After the release of his pent up aggression, his self-hate and despair exploded inwardly and he turned the knife on himself. Seen objectively, even the perpetrator in such tragic cases is a victim whose life trajectory was, in a sense, predestined from an early age by his treatment at the hands of adults.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

@Schopenhauer

Some who are excluded and rejected by the society come to hate the society and people. All human beings have a danger to become like him. Everybody has a trace of madness. It is a part of human nature. Cruel society produces cruel people.

“It’s part of human nature” you say.

I agree, but most people of a social engineering bent would disagree.

If true, such people from an early age reject social interaction and exclude themselves. This act of self-exclusion and rejection are then met with exclusion and rejection by others which only proves the malcontent’s assumptions. In this case, people must die.

If there are “bad seeds”, this would preclude any intervention to prevent such incidents unless certain personality traits themselves are identified as criminal and those people possessing them - or possessed by them - are incarcerated in mental hospitals or prisons.

This would be an admission that society cannot shape all behavior.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Keep it up! Yes, Japan is a relatively safe country, yet like myself and a few others have have been saying for an awfully long time, Japan has some serious issues regarding crime, and the public is kept in the dark about all but the worst of it, as the overwhelming majority does not make the news, locally nor nationally.

There is no way to be 100% "safe", but taking common sense precautions, can help you and your children to avoid being a victim. Teaching children to develop and more importantly trust, their "6th sense" or "street smarts", paying attention to things around them, not keeping their heads in smart phones, things many of us take for granted when travelling or living in a foreign country, need to be taught to the children (and plenty of adults here as well)

Compared to where I grew up (London) Japan is certainly a lot safer. But I have always been aware of the problems that one could face in Japan. I certainly didn't come to Japan with rose tinted glasses that many foreigners seem to have. I love Japan, but I've also always spoken to others about the social problems and crime that breaks one's opinion on this perceived utopia...

Teaching our children common sense and also how to defend themselves was a precaution that's very important to us. But that's because in my mind I want my daughters to be prepared in the event of molesters. Though I hope that what we can teach them could also help provide them with knowledge in how to pay attention to their surroundings at all times and the dangers that could occur like with yesterday's incident.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Dude was sick. Sad part again, one man, fell through the cracks of society, no one to look after him, no assistance with his obvious mental illness, and everyone AFTER the fact jumping on the bandwagon of his "strangeness", looking to find an excuse for his actions.

I have a neighbor who I won't be surprised if he snaps like this. Have already talked to neighborhood "leaders" and the local koban, they haven't done anything and probably won't until he snaps.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Very sad story. With guns you can bring in new laws, but with knives, what should be the best course of action. Probably better identification mechanism and facilities for mentally ill seems to be the only solution. I hope such kind of thing never happens again.

Some rules don't make any sense at all. It is easy to purchase a knife compared than to get a voice sim card costing only 1460yen.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

know the school is popular and Japan is "safe" but, having an 11 year old commute from Tama city to Kawasaki by herself is absolutely ridiculous...That's an hour and 10 min, plus a walk to the bus station, wait, and a bus ride (not sure how long that is)...

I used to commute 50 mins morning and evening to school when I was 10. I only had one bad experience when a man in his 20s or 30s came up to me and a friend and asked us if we'd ever "seen a pr*ck before".

I wish I had said "yeh, I'm looking at one now" but you don't think of these things when you're a kid.

It's a long commute for some but that said, Japan is a safe country, overall. These tragedies are so heartbreaking precisely because they are so random and rare.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It's a long commute for some but that said, Japan is a safe country, overall. These tragedies are so heartbreaking precisely because they are so random and rare.

Yea you're right. I just think with the amount of schools available, kids shouldn't have to commute so far just for education. I'm guessing its close to an hour and a half one way, that's 3 hours a day spent just commuting, maybe more. Wouldn't that time be better spent studying or playing, or spending time with family...?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

know the school is popular and Japan is "safe" but, having an 11 year old commute from Tama city to Kawasaki by herself is absolutely ridiculous...That's an hour and 10 min, plus a walk to the bus station, wait, and a bus ride (not sure how long that is)...

I totally agree with this though truth be told she could have been facing a 10 minute commute and the result would be the same. As TH says, I'd be more worried about gropers. Not sure about other countries, but the idea of putting my daughter on public transport at crush-hour for 3-6 years of her life is not something that will be considered in my household, no matter how excellent the school may be.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

Why no picture of him? Are criminals having rights to hide their identity now?

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

This story makes me feel sick. I really didn't want to say good bye to my kids this morning.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Mental health problems?....

What mental health problems?....

Japan doesn't have mental health problems...

Yes some do, all countries do, but the system here shuns people who are different and doesn't wanna admit there are people who with issues therefore people cannot get the assistance they need.

Condolences will come, nothing will change, wool back over peoples eyes.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Why no picture of him? Are criminals having rights to hide their identity now?

How could he do that when he's dead?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Another loser male with no friends and no life. When was the last time a loner woman ran out and started stabbing people? Many will blame mental health issues - and yes, that plays a role - but until we start discussing this a a male problem, we won't see an end to it. It has happened here many time - Akihabara, Ikeda - and many times in China. ALL men. Let's talk about getting men better support so they don't end up this full of rage and target the most innocent.

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

Christopher Bauer's asked

"why is the English translation of the criminal's words written as "I'm gonna kill you," instead of "I'm going to kill you?" Is there some idiomatic Japanese that the reporter wished to convey in English?"

My reply ' Yes, I believe there is' The criminal most probably shouted an informal slang similar to " 殺すぞ " which roughly translates into "gonna kill ya"

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I understand that brutal crimes like this might cause people to question the "safe country" image of Japan, but it is borne out by evidence. The homicide rate in Japan per 100,000 in 2016 was only 0.28, compared to 5.35 in the US, meaning you are about 20 times more likely to be murdered in the US than in Japan. Japan's rate is by far the lowest among major countries and its only tiny ones like Vatican City which have lower rates.

The fact that this crime is getting so much attention is also indicative of how safe it is here - in the US a murder spree with only two fatalities wouldn't even make the national news.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Despite this horrible crime, Japan is still a lot more safer country for your kids. Don't be over exaggeratly shaken and worry like you have to leave right away. But where do u can go for safer place anyway when you're already in one of the most safest country.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

This horrifying incident has made me and my wife rethink how our girls will be getting to and from their school in Tokyo and we're now taking them to and from school ourselves.

Could this be jumping the gun on our part? Maybe. But we've always considered Japan to be safe and my wife never had problems walking to school by herself throughout her ES, JHS and HS days. But this has shaken us and made us reconsider our own naivety.

I understand you are scared but this can happen anywhere, anytime. Remember the guy who went inside the school and started stabbing kids a few years back. A lunatic just needs a chance and a tragedy will happen.

Why no picture of him? Are criminals having rights to hide their identity now?

They are showing a picture of him when he was 19 on TV the whole day.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

no assistance with his obvious mental illness, and everyone AFTER the fact jumping on the bandwagon of his "strangeness", looking to find an excuse for his actions.

I am only going by what I read on this site but only things I see his him complaining to a neighbor about a branch hitting him in the face and him working a late shift with few people ever seeing him. Oh and he reads manga. Is there more to this story that you are hearing because I wouldn't call him an obvious mentally ill person about to go on a rampage.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Another salient fact is that his parents divorced when he was 11 years old, and he was sent to live with distant relatives.

That happened over 40 years ago and this guy was 51.  That is no excuse for him to decide to do this.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Always same profile : man, no life, no kid or girlfriend.

It leads to obvious mental health issues.

The more there is, the more rampage likely to happen.

It does not mean Japan isn't safe, it is.

Just look your back because you can be killed without warning nor reason. That is really disturbing.

In a way, the killer fortunately went suicidal quickly.

RIP.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I have a neighbor who I won't be surprised if he snaps like this. Have already talked to neighborhood "leaders" and the local koban, they haven't done anything and probably won't until he snaps.

That's just it I think. Sometimes people just "snap". It could be something very small that sets them off too. The guy you're talking about though... is there anything he has done that actually warrants action other than being a bit of a weirdo? Bringing him to the attention of authorities is a good thing but there might not be much they can do other than consider themselves informed.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Laila KholoussiToday  10:20 am JST

Christopher Bauer's asked

"why is the English translation of the criminal's words written as "I'm gonna kill you," instead of "I'm going to kill you?" Is there some idiomatic Japanese that the reporter wished to convey in English?"

My reply ' Yes, I believe there is' The criminal most probably shouted an informal slang similar to " 殺すぞ " which roughly translates into "gonna kill ya"

It’s been reported he shouted "ぶっ殺してやる!” ”ぶっ~する” is stressing his action. maybe close

to adding f-words before verb

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Set aside Japan is the safest or not, Japan has been always like this and it's just not been reported enough or Japan was not like that and it definitely got worse. I would say the latter.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Zichi

ID card pic perhaps.. even if he was killed, media shows ID card photos of the criminal.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

Utility blades 8 cm and shorter are legal to carry. Might as well keep one on you.

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

Japan isn't as safe as you think, there's another of weirdos, stalker cases, cults - Aum shrinkyo now called Aleph, underground cults, yakuza, yakuza associates, chinpira, Chinese gangs etc

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Joe BlowToday 11:09 am JST

Utility blades 8 cm and shorter are legal to carry. Might as well keep one on you.

Actually I believe that limit is much closer to small pen knife length - about 5cm.

And even if carrying a very small bladed knife you can be questioned strongly by the police as to why you need such a thing. Happened to a friend in my city a few years back. He said it was to peel apples, but lost an hour of time giving the explanation.

Unless officially authorised or showing proof of use ie I'm a chef these are my tools, then there's an almost zero tolerance of knives in the street.

But of course such severe rules will not deter any crazy person hell bent on the destruction of innocent lives.

This whole story is still too sad to digest and analyze.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

My prayers and condolences to the families of Hanako Kuribayashi and Satoshi Oyama.

May they both rest in serene peace.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

It is perfectly understandable that the public, media are sickened, aghast when confronted with the honorific details to such a heinous act.

Government can only go so far to protect children and families from harm without demonising every middle age person waiting at a bus stop that happens to be occupied with children commuting to school.

The perpetrator Ryuichi Iwasaki, 51, referring to the perpetrator by name, lets not cower in the corner or filch away, committed an evil extreme appalling assault.

Ryuichi Iwasaki, 51, is/was criminally insane, a deranged psychopath with a violent mental disorder, regrettably maniacs are not born with any distinguishing feature to warn the public they're about to commit acts of carnage. I know, a fact that is of little consolation for the families of the victims.

I wish my faith and beliefs could convince me that Ryuichi Iwasaki will suffer, so justice will be served. I have to admit the convictions I have are wearing thin.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It’s relative. These comparisons are useless. Country X has a homicide rate of 0.01 per 100,000. Now all of a sudden Japan is dangerous. So what?

Lets compare it to a society with a higher homicide rate and feel good about ourselves.

Japan is safe! Tell that to the parents of the victims.

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

This is not the first time that such kind of random crazy person commit such kind of horrific things here in Japan,the media and especially the local government should ask themselves why such people tend to explode rather than just mourn the poor victims.

The lack of mental care and the high pressure in this society combined with the unwillingness to express openly own feelings is a dangerous combination that bring some of the mental ill subjects in very dangerous situation.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

It’s relative. These comparisons are useless.

If its relative, then by definition comparison is useful.

Lets compare it to a society with a higher homicide rate and feel good about ourselves.

This isn't cherry picking comparisons to feel good - compare Japan to any country in the world except for micro states like the Vatican and its murder rate is so low it is almost off the charts. Even the extremely safe countries in Scandinavia have murder rates about double those of Japan.

Japan is safe! Tell that to the parents of the victims.

What an obnoxious thing to suggest.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

Why no picture of him? Are criminals having rights to hide their identity now?

Good. I don't want to see a picture of him or know anything about him, other than maybe what drove him to do this.

I will take time to read stories about the victims if they are published, even though it is especially sad when a child is involved.

Remember the lives tragically lost and forget about the one that was wasted.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

". . . .a girl with a blood-stained shirt who was unresponsive as woman, who appeared to be her mother, held her hand crying uncontrollably. . " - That just broke me and brought me to tears. I'm so very sorry. May those who suffered from this most terrible crime, find some peace and comfort. xo

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I wonder whether either or both of the attackers (incl. Saitama) were on SSRIs (anti-depressants)? A quote from an article on psychologytoday.com says

“…more relevant to the discussion, is that these very drugs we hope can treat mental illness are at the same time drugs that cause violent behavior including suicide and aggression toward others. In fact, SSRI’s are the leading drugs in a recent list compiled of the Top Ten Drugs that cause violent behavior.”

As for knives, politicians in Britain are now trying to ban them because the number of stabbings has increased since guns were banned. Will Japan start going down the same path? I don’t think so but anything is possible.

https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2019-04-29/gun-ban-not-working-politicians-britain-now-want-ban-knives-nationwide

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Utility blades 8 cm and shorter are legal to carry. Might as well keep one on you.

Enjoy prison if you use them...As a foreigner, you have no rights to self defense with a weapon in Japan, or with your fists alone for that matter.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Very sad case,very sorry for all those killed and injured. But it is time, to think abt what drove this man to such a level that killing others was his only answer ???. Japanese society must change, the society must start to have people that do not rob or steal or iijime others. I see the people in my office, they just iijime and waste time and caused misunderstanding for their selfish personally needs.Anybody under these unhunanways should speak up. I do. Let everybody knows abt them mean theives.Killing innocent victims do not help anyone.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

@TARA TAN KITAOKA

Agree with what you say re society, bullying and so on.

But it is time, to think abt what drove this man to such a level that killing others was his only answer ???

I alluded to a possible reason for his above but not sure why I got down-voted. The use of SSRIs can push a person with psychological issues over the edge who would not usually resort to such extreme behaviour. Not excusing what he did but it might provide an explanation if he was on meds - in some cases they can exacerbate an underlying problem. A search using the terms ssri and shootings will bring up plenty of links about this.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Besides a possible mental illness, I bet he was either a neglected or spoiled child. With the first being a common case in this country.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

tmarie quote: "When was the last time a loner woman ran out and started stabbing people? Many will blame mental health issues - and yes, that plays a role - but until we start discussing this a a male problem, we won't see an end to it. It has happened here many time - Akihabara, Ikeda - and many times in China. ALL men.

Another stabbing coming up in the news today, this time by a woman. (Not so uncommon in Japan as some think.) There was another earlier in May too.

https://www.nikkansports.com/general/news/201905290000228.html

1 ( +1 / -0 )

When was the last time a loner woman ran out and started stabbing people? Many will blame mental health issues - and yes, that plays a role - but until we start discussing this a a male problem, we won't see an end to it. It has happened here many time - Akihabara, Ikeda - and many times in China. ALL men.

Ok... and?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The safety of bus routes? What are they going to do? Install metal detectors? X-ray passengers? Post armed guards at every stop? How about actually putting an effort into funding programs dealing with mental health awareness and therapy? It’s sickening to watch this country shift the blame from one thing to the other while never admitting that Japanese society has serious problems which cause the mental deterioration of countless numbers of its citizens.

Don’t let the lives lost in this incident be in vain. Japan needs to rally together and start talking openly about mental health issues. Bring awareness and understanding so that these people have somewhere to turn when they need help, rather than feeling fear and anxiety at the thought of further rejection and seclusion from a society that shuns people for being different. Mental health is not a choice, it is a condition that is shaped by the social world we are raised in.

We are all to blame for what happened this week and it is our responsibility to carry this burden and do right by those who suffer because we refuse to help one another. Look your sons and daughters in the eyes and remember that in this society, any one of them could end up a victim of mental health issues. They weren’t born destined to take their own lives or to harm others but they have just as much potential as any one else to do so in the future.

We shouldn’t be looking to prevent someone from harming others or committing suicide. We should be looking to prevent the thought itself from ever entering a person’s mind. Japan needs to create a better quality of life for it’s citizens. A healthy heart and a healthy mind are the best defense we can have in preventing such tragedies from reproducing themselves day after day, year after year. An individual’s mental health is a reflection of society as a whole.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

This obviously a mental health issue. One person commented on it always being "Men" who do these horrific things. By nature males of any species tend to be the aggressive ones. World wide we need a better handle on mental illness as these incidents happen all the time. The weapon of choice doesn't matter. Its the unstable person wielding it. I have had a swiss army knife in my pocket for 45 years. Never with any intent as a weapon. It's a tool i use daily, if not hourly. Including grade and high school. I remember teachers not restricting the fact we carried them we where told to behave properly and not carve are names on school property. Imagine that, giving us responsibility with a potentially dangerous item instead of brow beating us with "What if's"

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I cannot help but think that we in Japan as a society nurtured and bred this kind of man. How come there were no interventions done for the guy with seemingly psychological disorder in school, at work, in the neighborhood? Protecting the safety of our children and our neighborhood is definitely important, but it is equally or even more important to address the issue of how come this man was left just like that to function in society with little to no intervention! I really hope we draw attention to this and see the factors that led to this and what can be done, as a community, as a society as a whole.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Login to leave a comment

Facebook users

Use your Facebook account to login or register with JapanToday. By doing so, you will also receive an email inviting you to receive our news alerts.

Facebook Connect

Login with your JapanToday account

User registration

Articles, Offers & Useful Resources

A mix of what's trending on our other sites