crime

Popular T Card began giving personal info to police in 2012

20 Comments

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Backs up the old adage that nothing is ever free. You might earn some points but you give up your personal info/shopping habits/location and so on.

15 ( +15 / -0 )

Wow. This is exactly the reason I’m still reluctant to give my MyNumber to any one - I have absolutely no faith that the people holding my details will act in good faith.

15 ( +15 / -0 )

When something is free, then you are the product.

Be it points-card, free smartphone applications, Google, Facebook, Twitter, other SNS, free registration on websites, etc...

10 ( +10 / -0 )

Cops also have access to your Google searches and most sns apps..

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Line app is also accessible by the cops, if they ever need to look for people..

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Line app is also accessible by the cops, if they ever need to look for people..

I don’t know if this is true or not, but Line has end-to-end encryption, so even if police were to get access to Line’s servers, they can only see when messages were sent and between who, but not the contents. There is other info that can probably also be gleaned though like location.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

They do have access, plus 2ch, how else did the cops intercept multiple weirdo otaku before attacks recently.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

T-card...why I said no thank you.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

At least with T card people have a choice. The soon-to-be introduced 5G together with IoT will be T card on steroids and harder to avoid unfortunately.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

I cannot imagine that the police would be very interested in what movie a suspect rented, or what they ate. Probably more interested in where they were on a particular date, and of course the phone number and address. But surely they would have these two from other sources.

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

"We have cooperated with investigative organizations to further contribute to society," Culture Convenience Club said on its website.

No you didn't you gave away private information. I stopped using this stupid tracking track years ago, this just goes to show what desperate companies do!

2 ( +2 / -0 )

The only people who have a problem with this are those who have something to hide. However, my concern is just how secure these cards are. After all, Japan is the capital of cyber crime in Asia.

-5 ( +2 / -7 )

so? its not private data... anyone who cared, didnt use it or used fake name...

and the comment above about iot and 5g is simply ridiculous... do you even know what it means?

I wonder how some of you manage to tie shoes in the morning.

-8 ( +0 / -8 )

The only people who have a problem with this are those who have something to hide

That’s silly. There are other reasons to have issues with this.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Omachi:

Prosecutors could use renting of a violent or prn film as a precursor to the suspect's act; buying of alcohol to get a date drunk and easier to take advantage of; etc. US courts have allowed to some extent too.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Disillusioned; the reason you have curtains on your windows is for privacy, not necessarily because you've got something to hide. Same with this. Are you happy with people in authority knowing your private information when they have a history of corruption and minding other people's lives?

Data mining is worth big money these days no matter how small and irrelevant it might seem.

@Alex Einz

and the comment above about iot and 5g is simply ridiculous... do you even know what it means?

Yes. You're only looking at the dots, not the picture.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

According to the sources, investigators have limited their point of contact to a certain section of the company's head office.

Sounds to me like the police had a hookup in a very specific person or person[s] and probably CCC wanted to keep it this way to keep things quiet. The less people that were involved, the better. Looks like that's all out of the bag now, though.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

I cannot imagine that the police would be very interested in what movie a suspect rented, or what they ate. Probably more interested in where they were on a particular date, and of course the phone number and address. But surely they would have these two from other sources.

Probably in most instances, the biggest and easiest usage of the data would be to establish habits and location, or for establish as you mention, a location. For example, if you claim that you were in Chiba on Tuesday night, but the police suspect you of a robbery in Roppongi, the fact your T-point card was swiped at a Roppongi Family Mart makes things interesting.

Also, as mentioned, depending on what data the T-point card registers, it can establish items purchased, again increasing your exposure to the cops.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

What's that? They secretly give your information to the police? Where's my scissors? Or does anyone have a card cutter?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

There would be a class-action lawsuit in a country that allowed class-action lawsuits.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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