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Prosecutors issue arrest warrant for Ghosn, 3 Americans over his escape

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By Yuri Kageyama

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Give It Up. You're not going to get him back

42 ( +50 / -8 )

Prosecutors say Ghosn broke the law by violating bail conditions that required him to stay in Japan, mostly at his Tokyo home.

You mean that after all this time they finally managed to figure out it was illegal for him to jump bail?

No wonder why they have to rely on confessions to get anyone convicted here!

39 ( +46 / -7 )

I'm curious to know what evidence they have to issue an arrest warrant for these US citizens. It's pretty clear that the Japanese prosecutors can issue arrest warrants on a whim, as they did to Ghosn the day before he was due to give a press conference. Just because Japan has an extradition treaty with the US does not mean they will be extradited on a whim. They will have to present their evidence to the US court and then a decision will be made about their extradition.

It just seems like petty sour grapes to me. The Japanese prosecutors are trying everything to save a bit of face.

Yes, Ghosn escaping Japan while on bail is illegal. However, the real criminals are the prosecutors who locked him up in solitary confinement indefinitely with constant threats of "Confess or it will get worse for you." They released him on absurdly strict bail conditions, which was more like house arrest than bail. They stopped his press conference by rearresting him on a minor charge the day before the event. Then, they purposely dragged out his eventual trial by stating they would address one charge at a time, meaning his trial could take years to get through the courts. All this is in an attempt to make him confess, regardless of the truth. To me, they are (were) afraid to let the truth come out and stripped him of his civil rights indefinitely to make him confess. They never wanted Ghosn to appear in court coz they knew they did not have a strong case.

And, just one final note for those who believe Ghosn is guilty of misappropriating funds: Every purchase or use of company funds he is being charged with was approved by the board of directors. He could not make these purchases or use company funds without their approval. This is where the prosecutors' case fails and where the underhanded rats come in. I have no doubt the reason they were dragging out his trial was to give the board of directors time to cover up their part in this underhanded corporate coup.

49 ( +59 / -10 )

Wish someone would break the lock on Saito's office and confiscate all of his files, then we would really find out what is going on.

WikiLeaks, we need you!

18 ( +24 / -6 )

It just seems like petty sour grapes to me.

Guilty or innocent, the dude jumped bail and left the country illegally. There's no question he is guilty of those two crimes.

-27 ( +10 / -37 )

This gives pigheadedness new dimensions, even by (post-war) Japanese standards. Mean and selfrightous, no matter the cost and how futile, they continue to dig.

21 ( +27 / -6 )

They will have to present their evidence to the US court and then a decision will be made about their extradition.

Exactly. As soon as the Japanese prosecutors hear an American judge say 'habeas corpus,' they're gonna be shaking in their Aoki suits.

25 ( +32 / -7 )

Stop with this circus... for real.

12 ( +20 / -8 )

Wait a minute, the system is lax as it was designed this way to not purposely upset the super rich as inconvenience with baggage checks and so instead blaming this on the Americans?

14 ( +20 / -6 )

The thing that would worry me about Japan in the 21st century is that the manner in which the whole Ghosn thing was handled, from beginning to end, has been totally unprofessional. I think the term "dysfunctional" applies here.

29 ( +34 / -5 )

@extanker - Guilty or innocent, the dude jumped bail and left the country illegally. There's no question he is guilty of those two crimes.

And, your point is? I'm quite sure everybody acknowledges this fact. However, one must consider why he was forced to take such action. The Japanese prosecutors did not (do not) have a strong case against him and were determined to drag his trial out for many years in the hope he would confess, guilty or not.

28 ( +36 / -8 )

Separately, Saito said prosecutors on Wednesday forced open a lock to search the Tokyo office of Ghosn's former defense lawyer Junichiro Hironaka for records of people Ghosn met with while out on bail, and other materials

Straight up stealing other lawyers info...

26 ( +30 / -4 )

Hahahahahahahahaha!

15 ( +18 / -3 )

I view Ghosn as guilty because he ran.

The only way he could convince me otherwise is if he surrendered back to Japanese authorities.

We know Japan uses a variation of Napoleonic Law. It’s a shame he didn’t tough it out.

And yeah, his hired mercenaries are in hot water too.

-26 ( +8 / -34 )

As soon as the Japanese prosecutors hear an American judge say 'habeas corpus,' they're gonna be shaking in their Aoki suits.

exactly. this is actually a good thing.

The japanese gov is doing everything to keep this in the spotlight, which means their crap justice system as well. The smart thing to do would have been to sweep this under the rug, but they're too dumb to do that.

16 ( +25 / -9 )

And, your point is? I'm quite sure everybody acknowledges this fact. However, one must consider why he was forced to take such action. The Japanese prosecutors did not (do not) have a strong case against him and were determined to drag his trial out for many years in the hope he would confess, guilty or not.

That's all irrelevant. He has clearly broken the law now and all the conspiracy theories and press conferences espousing his innocence won't change that one bit.

-17 ( +10 / -27 )

They really are going hard to save face anyway they can....anyone in his situation and the way he was treated would have jumped bail the first chance they had...

13 ( +16 / -3 )

The J-prosecutors still have not presented evidence of Ghosn's guilt to the Lebanese authorities. They were given 30 days to do that, ample time to run their photocopiers and delivery the papers by courier. Until they do that, the Lebanese will not contemplate taking any measures against Ghosn.

20 ( +24 / -4 )

"We want to stress that the act of fleeing was clearly wrong," Saito told reporters. "We need to erase the misunderstanding."

Theres no misunderstanding regarding that.

 The maximum penalty for hiding a criminal or helping a criminal escape is three years in prison or 300,000 yen ($2,750) in fines.

Just send the bill to Ghosn and save yourself some time and trouble.

19 ( +22 / -3 )

The maximum penalty under Japanese law for illegally leaving the country is one year in prison or 300,000 yen ($2,750) in fines, or both

‘Time served’ then.

24 ( +27 / -3 )

"However, one must consider why he was forced to take such action."

No. We don't.

The Law certainly does not.

You might (not knowing the Law, specifically on Bail, is responsible for it).

Skipping bail is a crime; he's now a criminal and will die as one, should this situation carry on unresolved.

He didn't care if by fleeing his own Solicitor could be in trouble; I'm tired of repeating that over here in the UK, said Solicitor would be struck off by the SRA.

No amount of sugar coating/hate for all things Japanese will remove that criminal tag that now hangs around his neck.

-20 ( +6 / -26 )

Here we go again...

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Lock up the corporate criminal and his imperialist henchmen.

After all, as those who support law and order like to say - why run if you've nothing to hide?

-16 ( +5 / -21 )

hate for all things Japanese

To like Japan doesn't mean you have to embrace the BS.

16 ( +18 / -2 )

"you have to embrace the BS."

Unless you think the Law is BS...

Dura lex sed lex.

Whether you like it, or not.

-15 ( +4 / -19 )

It took them a whole month to figure out if it was illegal to jump bail, lol.

12 ( +13 / -1 )

@Toasted Heretic

After all, as those who support law and order like to say - why run if you've nothing to hide?

To escape the hopeless situation of a one-sided justice system fueled by irrational malice.

18 ( +20 / -2 )

And, just one final note for those who believe Ghosn is guilty of misappropriating funds: Every purchase or use of company funds he is being charged with was approved by the board of directors. He could not make these purchases or use company funds without their approval. 

Nope. That's not true, at least, according to Nissan's internal investigation. Approvals of BoD must be based on the presentation of accurate info on what to resolve/approve by BoD. If those are misrepresented or use some pretexts, lack appropriate backgrounds, of course, they are all invalid.

You know Ghosn never went into details but just done some cheap screen plays.

-14 ( +3 / -17 )

DisillusionedToday  07:12 am JST - Agree.

Ghosn has started laying his cards on table as soon as he was out of Japan in the form of concrete evidence. Still waiting for the japan prosecutors to present their side of story to counter Ghosn's claims. These kind of petty events like issuing arrest warrants, counter arguments etc are mere distractions. In other words this high profile case is now out of the courtrooms and into the global media where judgement is based more on perceptions and interpretations rather than the actual facts. Hope the Japan legal system realize this sooner to avoid further embarrassment.

15 ( +17 / -2 )

DisillusionedToday 07:12 am JST

The whole "they don't have a case against Ghosn" stuff is frankly inconsistent with the facts. At best one may still suggest they don't have a "criminal-grade" case, BUT it is already good enough his lawyer is pinning his hopes on finding something on a fishing expedition which is why he has to keep begging the judge to compromise the Victim's privacy and corporate secrecy. If there is no case, he would not have to do that at all - in fact, his interest would be to make as few motions as possible so it shifts to trial ASAP.

-15 ( +3 / -18 )

Nope. That's not true, at least, according to Nissan's internal investigation.

That is a credible source(sarcasm). It was also found that 80 other executives were involved in the same practice including Saikawa. Where were their arrest warrants and indefinite confinement. Why were they not named in public? When that was raised with the Board, they voted to remove that person. Cover-up much?

The connection between the MOJ and Nissan is probably this: there is a traditional practice (known as amakudari) of assigning retired government officials to top positions within Japanese companies, even if they do not have the proper experience.

Those are probably some of the government officials that Ghosn were planning to name.

14 ( +18 / -4 )

Ghosn came ghosn ate ghosn ran away end of story if hapan wanta him back just divert the fund for lebanon to hizbullah he will return back in cargo to japan

-9 ( +3 / -12 )

To escape the hopeless situation of a one-sided justice system fueled by irrational malice.

If one pursues capitalist goals to its ultimate end, it's not surprising that the law will be challenged (whether that law is deemed unfair or not). It is also no surprise that corporates will ally themselves with professional lawbreakers (the US associates) in order to further break the law.

Capitalism is a hypocrite and eventually eats itself.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

OMG; I love this one, lmao:

Just send the bill to Ghosn and save yourself some time and trouble.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Japan should open up a back channel with Hizbullah and indirectly send them some cash; they'll send Ghosn back to Japan in a dog cage. They control Lebanon and couldn't care less about this dirty criminal family. Ghosn used private actors to break the law in fleeing like a coward, Japan should too now.

-13 ( +5 / -18 )

I have dealt with the legal system not criminal, however, it did not matter I was a foreigner no chance. With that said, I was to learn from my Japanese lawyer it does not matter if you are a foreigner or not when you are dealing with the government or prosecutors zero chance no matter how rock hard your evidence is.

10 ( +15 / -5 )

Nobuo Gohara: Lawyer AND former prosecutor in the special investigation unit in Tokyo.

This is someone who knows what he is talking about. This is what he has to say about the Ghosn case..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w54KOA7Mo1w

3 ( +7 / -4 )

mu-da Today  07:37 am

LOL. game is on, bring it. The best outcome for Ghosn is lifetime confinement in tiny Lebanon. thats for sure

-13 ( +4 / -17 )

LOL. game is on, bring it. The best outcome for Ghosn is lifetime confinement in tiny Lebanon. thats for sure

Or a life living in several non-extradition countries where he can still spend all his money and probably live like a king.

A life better than many people not wanted by the Japanese corrupt justice system for embarrassing them.

13 ( +15 / -2 )

Capitalism is a hypocrite and eventually eats itself.

And your beloved socialism is nothing but red tape and bureaucracy that requires strong centralized control in the hands of people who have failed upward and think they know what's best for everyone.

3 ( +8 / -5 )

He fled a system that proclaimes justice, THEY even have defence lawyers! judges! just like adults do. But the end result is set well before any toddler trial happen. He was under surveillance that was checked on the 15th of every month. NISSAN has spent more on surveillance than they claim he misappropriated and even their survaillance took a holiday. It's time for Noddy to take over ¥10 an hour. It's a system that is unique to Japan and deserves a World Heritage Listing. Like Saudi Arabia without the bone saws.

11 ( +13 / -2 )

@ Peeping tom

Dura lex sed lex.

Clearly your education does not allow you tonunderstqnd this Roman but modern principle.

Law can be harsh but acceptable if same for all...

Tell more about Saikawa, to start with please.

Lol

10 ( +15 / -5 )

It's a system that is unique to Japan and deserves a World Heritage Listing. Like Saudi Arabia without the bone saws.

LOL! brilliant!

8 ( +12 / -4 )

[ Yes, Ghosn escaping Japan while on bail is illegal. However, the real criminals are the prosecutors who locked him up in solitary confinement indefinitely with constant threats of "Confess or it will get worse for you."}

Well-stated.

3 ( +9 / -6 )

he has to keep begging the judge to compromise the Victim's privacy and corporate secrecy

Nissan cannot call itself a "victim", just as Ghosn cannot be called a "perpetrator", until they prove their case against him. Until that time, the company is an "accuser" or "alleged victim".

6 ( +11 / -5 )

The Japanese prosecutors are confused. There’s no misunderstanding about jumping bail. Ghosn knows that it was illegal and has no intentions of returning. No new revelations there. But the idea that Ghosn is guilty simply because he fled is preposterous. That’s like blaming a woman for escaping detention in Saudi Arabia for not wearing a burka. At some point you need to question the fairness of the justice system detailing the person.

10 ( +17 / -7 )

An attempt at face saving by prosecutors and the DoJ that is likely to end up the same place the case they had agains Ghosn did - in the wind.

4 ( +10 / -6 )

@Aly Rustom,

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w54KOA7Mo1w

Thanks for this, mate. Have started to watch, but realize it will take some time! Will save for tonight, probably accompanied by a nice beverage and perhaps even a stogie.

But, it sure looks to be informative.

4 ( +8 / -4 )

@Kazuaki ShimazakiToday  10:23 am JST

It's the prosecutors who are always on a fishing expedition. We've seen literally hundredss of cases in which a warrant is issued based on insufficient evidence and a person is arrested without adequate evidence who is then "re-arrested" until he has been coerced into confessing - thruthfully or not. This is the foundation of the Japanese system of "justice". It would be interesting to know the percentage of requests for arrest warrants by prosecutors that are rejected due to lack of sufficent evidence. I would venture that it is vanishingly small.

8 ( +14 / -6 )

Thanks for this, mate.

no problem brother!

Have started to watch, but realize it will take some time! Will save for tonight, probably accompanied by a nice beverage and perhaps even a stogie.

yes. sounds like an excellent plan!

But, it sure looks to be informative.

It is really very much so. And Mr Gohara tries very hard to be objective. enjoy mate!

1 ( +7 / -6 )

ThonTaddeoToday  11:25 am JST

Nissan cannot call itself a "victim", just as Ghosn cannot be called a "perpetrator", until they prove their case against him. Until that time, the company is an "accuser" or "alleged victim".

The standards between a defendant and a victim are different. A victim merely has to suffer a loss - if someone stole your thing, there might be no suspects because no one saw anything, but you are a Victim.

Further, if Nissan is not a victim, then it's official position is a neutral. It is under little obligation to compromise its privacy and corporate secrecy for the sake of the defendant.

-7 ( +6 / -13 )

SilvafanToday  10:45 am JST

nope, the Lebanonese goverment already placed a restraining order or him. He's not going anywhere cept Japan

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

To be constructive here, I wish the Japanese system would adopt a Miranda type system where you have the right to remain silent means they leave you alone and only communications are between the investigators/prosecutors and your lawyer - and your lawyer and you. The way that would work is if you have nothing to say to the investigators/prosecutors they just leave you alone in your cell and/or let you out on bail.

A lot of people think the system is bad in Japan even though the incarceration rate is about 10% that of the USA. It isn't perfect and no country's is. But if the US decides to send these people back to Japan (including Ghosn if he steps on US soil) then the system isn't super bad - right? Would the US extradite a person to China for the crime of Xi Jinping Winnie the Pooh Jokes? Of course not, but this is something different.

For Ghosn, hope he can stay in Lebannon to enjoy his last 15-20 years of his life. For Taylor, maybe he got a million or two dollars and he might spend not more than 1 year in a Japanese prison (Japan does have very short prison sentences on a global scale)? Sure! I'd go for that. It would be a nice pension and a nice calculated risk.

And is any of this Ghosn's fault?

Former General Motors Vice Chairman Bob Lutz believes ousted Nissan boss Carlos Ghosn’s ego contributed to the executive’s fall from grace and current status as an international fugitive.

Lutz, who said he’s known Ghosn for a number of years, said the embattled executive suffers from a “god complex” as well as “CEO disease,” where a person believes they are omnipotent and “above the law” because of their power.

“That type of personality does tend to pretty easily slip over the line and do things that the rest of us would not do because they think they’re so important and so well connected and of such vast importance to the economy that no one would ever call them on it,” Lutz, a well-known outspoken automotive icon, said

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

@Sparky Santos - I view Ghosn as guilty because he ran.

But, what did he run away from? He didn’t run away from prosecution. He ran away from persecution. They are two very different things. He is guilty of skipping bail and leaving Japan. Anything else is just hearsay and unproven accusations. He deserves his day/s in court to defend himself in a fair trial. Under the Japanese injustice system he is guilty and has to prove his innocence. However, he has been banned from making any attempt to clear his name and/or prepare his defense. This is a travesty of justice, which is in itself a criminal act, except in Japan, of course

5 ( +13 / -8 )

"We want to stress that the act of fleeing was clearly wrong," Saito told reporters. "We need to erase the misunderstanding."

This is fact.

However, it's entirely forgivable, too, given the circumstances in which Ghosn found himself. 

Which free, innocent human being would have rather passively submitted themselves to Japan's unfair justice system and prison for a loooooong time, given the choice? I 100% sympathize with his actions.

Ghosn's dramatic escape, while under the watch of surveillance cameras inside and outside his home is an embarrassment for Japanese authorities.

No - its justice system is the embarrassment.

Ghosn wouldn't have had such incentive to flee had it been clear that he'd have a fair trial.

2 ( +10 / -8 )

The Japanese prosecutors are trying everything to save a bit of face.

I am totally on Ghosn's side, but you know I think the prosecutors are just doing their job at this point. It's probably not these individual prosecutors who think they want to bring Ghosn and his accomplices to justice, it's more them following their procedures and things by the book. At a human level, I'm sure they understand that it's frivolous - but that's the fault of the system, not the individual prosecutors, I feel. I want to give them the benefit of the doubt, just as I do for Ghosn :)

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Which free, innocent human being would have rather passively submitted themselves to Japan's unfair justice system and prison for a loooooong time

Once you are sentenced to prison in Japan it's actually quite short. It's a fact. The guilty until proven innocent part is not good.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

expatToday 11:38 am JST

We've seen literally hundredss of cases in which a warrant is issued based on insufficient evidence and a person is arrested without adequate evidence who is then "re-arrested" until he has been coerced into confessing - thruthfully or not. This is the foundation of the Japanese system of "justice". It would be interesting to know the percentage of requests for arrest warrants by prosecutors that are rejected due to lack of sufficent evidence. I would venture that it is vanishingly small.

I can't comment on "hundreds of cases" for which you provide zero details for a determination of the details. I will also point out that mostly in these cases you hear the whine of the defendant rather than the evidence the prosecutor did have. However, it must be noted that even if you have hundreds of cases that are all substantiated, that will still be a tiny minority of the huge number of total cases.

Some details, however, have leaked out of the Ghosn case. We know the French and Americans are investigating him, we know he is already cutting losses with bargains elsewhere. We know his lawyer is already going on fishing expeditions. Gohara is basically arguing he has a good chance based on an interpretation of law.

If you think about it, even if there is an inclarity why the court should rule it in his favor is unclear. There is one direction that better serves the purpose of the article (accountability), and it is not in favor of Ghosn.

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

Give up on face saving, or it will get worse for you.

3 ( +10 / -7 )

"Clearly your education does not allow you tonunderstqnd this Roman but modern principle.

Law can be harsh but acceptable if same for all..."

I don't know if I should laugh or cry after this.

Probably both.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

What a circus... Where are the prosecutors who should indict Abe for clearly and admittedly using tax-payer public money for his party and its own benefits with the Sakura-miru-kai and related - that is supposed to be a 'public event' -while the list and the data of the participants are said to by a privacy-issue? Why is he not indicted formally and prosecuted by authorities for evident misconduct?

7 ( +15 / -8 )

Just when I thought they couldn't possibly sink any lower, they outdo themselves lol

2 ( +10 / -8 )

Go ahead, issue arrest warrants. That's all Tokyo Prosecutors are good at.

-1 ( +10 / -11 )

Oh gracious me, I know saving face is a big thing in east Asia, but the Japanese have taken it to the next level.

3 ( +14 / -11 )

It's about time the prosecutors should done surgical masks and carry many cardboard boxes into a Van. Only then are we assured they are actually capable of doing their job.

With a focus on finding the truth......ha ha ha. Not going to happen. Truth! they would loose their jobs. Best to save face.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Nobuo Gohara: Lawyer AND former prosecutor in the special investigation unit in Tokyo.

This is someone who knows what he is talking about. This is what he has to say about the Ghosn case..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w54KOA7Mo1w

Watched the press conference and many other videos that he appears on youtube

There are very few people like him in this country who are brave enough to call a spade

a spade. The mainstream media in this Ghosn saga has been a total disgrace, it is as if

the J-TV is the mouthpiece of the prosecutors.

Let me leave it here before I get banned.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

Shutting the door after the horse has bolted

3 ( +5 / -2 )

The criminal has to stay in Lebanon, no civilized country will accept such a tainted and criminal family, and likely he'll end up dead at some point in Beirut, so dominant is Hizbullah the terrorist group in that country. Maybe he finances them, in that case he's safe but will be targeted by Israel and the West meaning a quick end. Either way he's done for. Good riddance

-4 ( +12 / -16 )

likely he'll end up dead at some point in Beirut, so dominant is Hizbullah the terrorist group in that country. Maybe he finances them, in that case he's safe but will be targeted by Israel and the West meaning a quick end. Either way he's done for. Good riddance

Er, much as I loathe corporate criminals, I'd rather not that scenario you've depicted.

He needs to be brought to justice, alongside his accomplices. That's good enough for me.

11 ( +16 / -5 )

@Seth M

SilvafanToday  10:45 am JST

nope, the Lebanonese goverment already placed a restraining order or him. He's not going anywhere cept Japan

The J-gov has 40 days to provide evidence to Lebanon. The same with the US for those soldiers. If they don't provide valid evidence then no extradition, and Ghosn is gone. The evidence don't guarantee that they will hand him over. No extradition treaty. It is at the whim of the country holding the suspect. Even if lives in Lebanon forever, he will be there living large in his own culture around people he know.

They same is true with Huawei Canada and US.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

If you enter Japan, do business in Japan, or commit crimes in Japan, you have consented to being subject to the Japanese justice system regardless of how harsh it may be or how flawed you think it is. The same is true for every other country.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

Give up, throw in the towel. You've lost. Stop trying to save face.

6 ( +7 / -1 )

Yeah, Nobuo Gouhara: Lawyer AND former prosecutor in the special investigation unit in Tokyo. his press conference at FCCJ was not too bad despite, again, he chose to skip JNPC over to FCCJ just like Shiori Ito did so. Confrontation between Ex-prosecutors in the unit and active ones in the unit for the justice is not unusual at all.

One thing to remember, he is not in the position where he could gain undisclosed info any more than all of you guys, except what he heard from Ghosn himself through private interview which he is going to publish a book about.

-7 ( +0 / -7 )

Deputy Chief Prosecutor Takahiro Saito, is wasting time and public funds. He is making everyone in Japan wondering why saikawa and all of the other guilty ones are not yet arrested and jailed ???.

Pls explian to us , people, who pay tax.

6 ( +8 / -2 )

you have consented to being subject to the Japanese justice system regardless of how harsh it may be or how flawed you think it is.

True.

And it makes me uncomfortable - but then I don’t expect I’ll be framed in the manner than Ghosn must be assumed to have been, given the presumption of innocence (that he was neglected). I’m just a small fish. I have no doubt he thinks he never did anything illegal, until his final acts in this country, at which point the rules of the game were different.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

This is going to get complicated and drag out for many years. Half the people on either side will be gone by then. If this is just about saving face, just hang it up. You’ll save a lot of money, too. I’m sure a few I’m sorries would go a long way but I fear this ain’t gonna happen.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

No amount of evidence will be enough for the anti-Japan crowd. Ghosn represents them and their views best. Opportunistic, attack Japan, lie about facts, run away like a coward, break the laws.

-8 ( +2 / -10 )

Let him have his day in court in Lebanon

If they believe they can prove him guilty in Japan, they can prove him guilty in Lebanon

If they're afraid, then their case might not be that good

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Japan, drop the whole case now and work on reforming and fixing the Japanese Criminal Justice system because no one gets a fair trial at all, this is one the reasons why I chose to go back home to the US because the Japanese criminal justice system is corrupt, and a number of Japanese native girls posting inappropriate content on social media trying to expose themselves to sexual exploitation, problems caused by the number of yutori generation Japanese people that will cause another high rise of child abuse cases since 2018

5 ( +5 / -0 )

He certainly didn't run away like a coward. It was an extremely brave and well executed plan, had it not worked he would be in prison fir a year and the Americans for three, hmmmm again that's not fair, why do they get three, and Ghosen only one if caught, should be the other way round

4 ( +4 / -0 )

"We want to stress that the act of fleeing was clearly wrong," Saito told reporters. "We need to erase the misunderstanding."

Sounds vaguely Japanese, to 'erase' things that make Japan look bad.

You'd think that with all the embarrassment surrounding this escape, Japan might finally take this example as a lesson to clean up its act but I doubt it will. The fact that they continue on to embarrass themselves by trying to remove the egg from their face only to reposition it isn't helping their case. Take a page out of your own playbook Japan and admit what you've done wrong and how you created this mess.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Odd that no one has mentioned here that Ghosn pleaded no contest and was fined one million dollars and barred from corporate positions for ten years by the US Securities and Exchange Commission for a subset of the charges he faces in Japan. (Kelly paid a $100,000 fine and was barred for five years.) Nissan itself was fined $15 million.

https://english.kyodonews.net/news/2019/09/6026bcabfc5f-nissan-ex-boss-ghosn-settle-with-sec-over-false-disclosures.html

Odd too that no one has mentioned that Ghosn is under investigation in France and the Netherlands.

The Japanese criminal justice system may need reform (I think it does) but that does not in and off itself mean that Ghosn is innocent.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Odd that no one has mentioned here that Ghosn pleaded no contest and was fined one million dollars and barred from corporate positions for ten years by the US Securities and Exchange Commission for a subset of the charges he faces in Japan. (Kelly paid a $100,000 fine and was barred for five years.) Nissan itself was fined $15 million.

I keep saying that most here are not constructive about their criticisms. I think what would make Japan's system better is to have a Miranda type system like they have in many other countries. That way you can't be you just can't be grabbed off the street for a "she said-he said" type accusation unless there is real proof just to be released later by the prosecutors and loss of you job as a parting gift.

Odd too that no one has mentioned that Ghosn is under investigation in France and the Netherlands.

What countries would he be safe in from extradition? If all these countries still want him is it Japan's fault still?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Japan does not honor overseas court rulings on custody issues, refuses to implement the Int'l Convention of Child Abductions, arrests foreign fathers who come to Japan to try and see their kids but expects overseas authorities to cooperate with Japan's Kafka court to extradite Ghosn. So arrogant.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

Michael Taylor is a former Green Beret and private security specialist. Peter Taylor appears to be his son. 

If they are still in Japan seek refuge on any US military base Japanese have no authority.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

seek refuge on any US military base 

So if I'm American and I kill someone in Japan as long as I'm ex military I just need to hide out on a military base and I can escape justice? I honestly didn't know the US military provides that kind of support for their ex soldiers and sailors.

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

I agree with sensei258 already. Give it up! You're wasting your time. What is this anyway? Some kind of vendetta? You're just a bunch of sore losers!

1 ( +2 / -1 )

people can't say that Japanese legal system is rotten and escape the clutches law. It is the law is of the land and runs along with it. If you are doing business in Japan the foreign business CEO has to honour Japanese law. But i feel Japanese will have to pay more money and time to bring this fugitive from the clutches of the American judiciary. As Mr. Ghosn can't escape from the law of the Japan. what is definition of crime in Japan may not be crime in America. So this case will be watched very intensely and the Japanese Armour(police) was tested by this case it can be safely concluded that Japanese executives amenable to corruption.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

@nishikat nonsensical comparison nobody killed anyone

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Prosecurtors are still pushing deeply in their stupidy. Get ready everybody, we can prepare popcorn for a lot of time with them....

2 ( +2 / -0 )

When the prosecutors thought it a good idea to not allow his wife to see him was the big mistake.

The world would agree there was no basis other than to be cruel.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

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