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Trade minister resigns after only 1 month over allegations he broke election law

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Why is this in the crime section? No charges have been brought.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

When it comes to this issue it is a criminal one, as in the past Japanese politicians literally paid for votes, in one way or another, and giving money like this, through his office, is a clear violation of the election laws.

He would have been fine if he had given the money directly from himself, but his secretary allegedly did it for him.

As a veteran politician he probably knew, but thought no one would catch him at it!

5 ( +5 / -0 )

When it comes to this issue it is a criminal one, as in the past Japanese politicians literally paid for votes, in one way or another, and giving money like this, through his office, is a clear violation of the election laws.

I know this is a crime, but no charges have been brought yet, just allegations, so this belongs in the politics section.

-6 ( +0 / -6 )

I know this is a crime, but no charges have been brought yet, just allegations, so this belongs in the politics section.

"Alleged crime" is the key word! Just like the "alleged" crimes of others, they are not put into the business section but criminal section.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

To resign is standard practice so as to forestall any further investigations, both as regards his person, as well as other members of the LDP.

It also will help insure he is not convicted, which will make it easy for him to simply slide right back into another position later after everyone has forgotten this.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

"...Sugawara's secretary had offered 20,000 yen..."

Isn't it considered bad luck and rude to give even numbers of things?

I'm also wondering how much his first and last paycheck as trade minister is...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

hmmm. you can't give it away (per this story), you can't receive it (per the gift scandal). I suppose if you're a politician in Japan, you have to stop being a part of a community.

What ever happened to 'take care of one another' and 'being gracious'?

Abe San, I don't know what you expect but you're destroying what makes Japan special.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

Was about to write before reading the details about how corruption allegations and gift giving by the trade minister was not a great look, but 20000 yen at a funeral seems a bit harsh. If this is worth resigning over, surely these blokes must be on edge. Unless it was the tip of the iceberg but still seems very kibishii?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Unfortunately, he isn't PM and he can't get away with it.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

20000 yen at a funeral seems a bit harsh. If this is worth resigning over, surely these blokes must be on edge. Unless it was the tip of the iceberg

https://japantoday.com/category/crime/52-year-old-man-arrested-after-keeping-mother's-body-at-home

This ^^^ is probably tip of the iceberg too.

I can't come to terms with Abe forcing this minister to resign for helping a bereaving family. Where's the humanity?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It wasn't just the 20,000 yen, but the "expensive melons and crabs to local supporters". That's vote buying.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The law is restrict and needs to be.

Sugawara gave his Tokyo constituents expensive melons, oranges, roe and royal jelly. He is also said to have offered "condolence money" of 20,000 Japanese yen ($185; £145) to the family of a supporter. Election law bans politicians from sending donations to voters in their home constituency.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Osaka_Doug

The melons and other food treats were given years ago, and in other countries it's normal and expected that branch volunteers are rewarded for a win.

Noting also other polies like Motegi and Onodera also gave incense money. Yes, it's illegal, and for good reasons because the law intends that people of all backgrounds should have an equal chance in elections, but you know as well as I do, that's it's a mirage, and this particular minister is not buying his votes.

Also in context, this was a story that saw daylight courtesy of Shukan Bunshun (not exactly a pillar of ethics and journalistic integrity).

I hope he survives to fight another day.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

The law is restrict and needs to be.

Sometime, the law is an ass.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Abe told reporters he accepted Sugawara's offer to step down, saying "the responsibility lies with me for having appointed him."

Really? So are you going to step down too to take responsibility for choosing him?

What a joke! When has Abe EVER taken responsibility for anything while he has been PM?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Hmm one minister thought gifts and money was ok, the other one think the environment is cool and sexy. Not looking good. Stepping down is best, now if the other one can do the same, considering Koizumi has no environmental engineering background.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

His only apology was for stepping down from his post? Such a pitiful statement.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

but 20000 yen at a funeral seems a bit harsh.

Who told you that happened only once ? He probably did like a local mayor here : he gave the list of all births, deaths, weddings registered in his town, the list of kids in town-managed schools, list of people over 65 to a PR team that sends cards, presents, or whatever, on tax money.

He would have been fine if he had given the money directly from himself

But even if those guys did pay personally, that's an unfair advantage over other election candidates that don't get the lists.

 a job at the now-defunct Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corp. 

His training at pork barrel ?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Sh1mon M4sada

Abe San, I don't know what you expect but you're destroying what makes Japan special.

Political corruption makes Japan special?

Sometime, the law is an ass.

Just not in this case. Laws against political corruption need to be strict, plentiful, and strictly enforced.

But, yeah, in the case of marijuana laws in Japan, it sure is.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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