crime

YouTuber, 2 others sent to prosecutors for stunt at Shibuya crossing

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This is a great use of police and prosecutorial resources. (Pure sarcasm.)

8 ( +21 / -13 )

The allegation against Harada is the latest in a series of arrests, including one in July after he allegedly ate fish that he had not paid for in a supermarket in the central Japan city of Okazaki, for which he was indicted in August.

He paid that food later

https://japantoday.com/category/crime/youtuber-indicted-for-eating-sashimi-at-supermarket-before-paying-for-it

While in custody, the YouTuber tested positive for the novel coronavirus. As a result, several people who were in close contact with him including some police officers were found to have contracted the virus.

Too bad for people that being involved for his case and got infected, there should be no case in the first place.

-2 ( +6 / -8 )

Idiots on both sides of the law. Simply amazing.

11 ( +15 / -4 )

Ahhh..referded to prosicucers, thinking bigger fish to fry.

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Moronic, how I despise YouTube pranksters

18 ( +23 / -5 )

some people go through life being productive, others sponge off of others and spend their time annoying everybody. get a job

7 ( +14 / -7 )

A YouTuber. Prankster twit. More akin to petty vandalism. Book him Danno.

9 ( +12 / -3 )

Only in Japan to kill humor. That is why it is called a prankster. No one was hurt or lost something.

I am not fond of youtubbers but you have to consider not everyone can be serious in life forever.

What is the percentage of happy people in Japan, remind me ?

This also while sexual assaults are not considered as an important matter and there is no national list of agressors of that type against children (see other article of the day in JT).

Pranks are annoying but they are only pranks as described.

By the way, there is nothing nada about the reason why they would be prosecuted.

-11 ( +3 / -14 )

Fools who watch him on YouTube only support his lifestyle

5 ( +7 / -2 )

Send those clowns to jail !!..

0 ( +5 / -5 )

So he is a criminal.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

Was the charge causing people to smile in a public place?

-1 ( +5 / -6 )

This is a great use of police and prosecutorial resources. (Pure sarcasm.)

yep.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

7 or 8 years ago I had a senior high school student tell me he intended to be one a professional YouTuber when he finished high school. I just laughed at him and told him to get a real career. This might actually be him. He is around the right age. It seems that being a professional YouTuber translates to being a professional troublemaker, in this case anyway.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I just laughed at him and told him to get a real career.

What's a "real career"? One where you work 9-10 hours a day, 6 days a week and earn peanuts? If you make Youtube videos you learn a lot, some you won't learn working your bottoms off for the rest of you life. Some of these Youtubers are millionaires, and some are doing nothing but entertain. So tell me, what's better about a "real career"?

0 ( +8 / -8 )

Stop releasing the guy without charges and start incarcerating him. All they’ve accomplished is giving him more fame, and more desire to up the ante and his hits on in YouTube

1 ( +5 / -4 )

what a nuisance. Glad to see shopkeepers not taking it

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Just fine him. That's all a misdemeanor like this requires.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

A lot of people here applauding their arrest, but I'm alarmed at how easy it is to get arrested for such minor things here. There's the examples in this story, the couple a year or so ago arrested for putting a camera on a sushi-train conveyer belt, and people arrested for plugging in their computer at an airport etc etc.

It seems anything can be construed as "obstructing business" and lead to your arrest.

4 ( +6 / -2 )

Paying any attention makes those idiots even more ‘famous’.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

The sheer number of people who think it’s clever to impose their low level arsery on the world is a grinding oppression we could do without. Consuming food that doesn’t belong to you is a crime. Deliberately causing an obstruction on a very busy crossing is a crime. I don’t think the guy needs the book throwing at him, but he is a d!?k. I suggest YouTube demonetise his anti social content and take away the reward for bad behaviour.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

There is no Japanese translation for “sense of humor “.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

The allegation against Harada is the latest in a series of arrests, including one in July after he allegedly ate fish that he had not paid for in a supermarket in the central Japan city of Okazaki, 

Oh that's the guy? I've seen some of these videos on youtube, IG, Tik Tok or wherever. Complete waste of time. Nothing amusing at all. Maybe if his videos were somewhat funny or intelligent? Then I might have some sympathy. I hope they keep fining this guy or reprimanding him or something.

On youtube this kind of garbage can be more or less easy to avoid, as I don't normally search for morons doing uninteresting things.

IG is avoidable, but there are a lot of random pop ups now that they are trying to promote REELS.

But fools like this really interrupt my TIK TOK feed. I definitely don't need to see guys eating food, jumping, doing lame dances or anything really. No one is watching dudes on Tik Tok anyways.

Get a job!

1 ( +1 / -0 )

7 or 8 years ago I had a senior high school student tell me he intended to be one a professional YouTuber when he finished high school. I just laughed at him and told him to get a real career.

The problem with that approach is the kid is thinking, "A real career? You mean like earning a paltry salary pretending to teach bored high school kids English?" It's not a teacher's job to tell students what they can't do. It's to inspire them to do what they want to do.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

commanteer

The problem with that approach is the kid is thinking, "A real career? You mean like earning a paltry salary pretending to teach bored high school kids English?" It's not a teacher's job to tell students what they can't do. It's to inspire them to do what they want to do.

I think you underestimate how much Youtubers can make once they hit the 100k mark. It is serious money.

I agree, it is not exactly a recommended career choice, but dont dismiss the attraction.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

my nephew was a prankster, until he bothered the wrong person. After being corrected in public, the police showed up and arrested him on the spot.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Harada, who has traveled across Japan to create YouTube videos, was quoted by the sources as saying to investigators that he had thought their action would not be considered a crime so long as they did not use a bed.

So not only is he unoriginal, he makes pathetic excuses, as well.

The allegation against Harada is the latest in a series of arrests, including one in July after he allegedly ate fish that he had not paid for in a supermarket in the central Japan city of Okazaki, for which he was indicted in August.

And he's a thief.

Harada was again arrested on Oct. 16 for obstructing business by claiming that the branded T-shirt he purchased in a shop in the western Japan city of Osaka was fake, despite the product actually being genuine. He was later released.

And he's a "claimer".

Real piece of work this guy is. Lock him up, please.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

He paid that food later

there should be no case in the first place.

So if someone steals something but pays for it if they're caught, it's not a crime? I'm missing the logic here.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

StrangerlandOct. 27 11:45 pm JST

Partially depends on when he handed over money for the food. The linked article says:

A Japanese YouTuber has been indicted for theft by the Nagoya Regional Public Prosecutors Office Okazaki branch after posting a video of himself eating sashimi before paying for it at a supermarket.

This wording implies he compensated for the sashimi shortly after consuming it and before it was caught. Despite the small monetary amount, it's actually an interesting case from a juristic point of view.

Doctrinally, theft is considered to be a crime of appropriation (assumption of ownership rights). Thus, if you have taken possession of something but have the intent of giving it back, it's not theft (that is, if you convince the judge you indeed intended to give it back, or you gave it back before you were caught).

In this case, though Accused has compensated for the sashimi before he was caught, it's also true that he has appropriated the sashimi by disposing of (eating) it without concluding a sales contract. The fact he compensated (you notice I'm avoiding the world paid) for the sashimi does not erase this fact.

So what do you think. Guilty or not?

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Idiotic, but nobody harmed and the world will survive. It has more pressing crises to attend to.

There are some genuinely creative YT'ers out there who deliver interesting, humorous and even educational content about Japan and I'd not lump in all of them with a handful of attention seeking idiots.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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