crime

Actress Takahata apologizes over son’s arrest on rape charge

109 Comments

Japanese actress Atsuko Takahata, 61, held a press conference on Friday morning, making an official apology on behalf of her 22-year-old son Yuta Takahata who was arrested Tuesday for allegedly raping a woman at a hotel in Maebashi, Gunma Prefecture.

A teary Takahata appeared in front of a media horde at 9 a.m. at a hotel in Tokyo’s Chiyoda ward, apologizing for her son’s crime and describing her brief meeting with him on Thursday at the Maebashi Police Station, where he is currently detained.

“My son has done something grave,” Takahata, dressed all in black, said as she opened the press conference, bowing deeply. “I cannot find words to express my deepest apology to the woman who had suffered in this crime; to the staff who have been affected (by the arrest) and who have had to cancel the film that my son had been working on,” she continued.

The press conference lasted for 70 minutes.

Takahata is accused for allegedly raping a woman in her 40s, an employee at the hotel he was staying at for a movie shoot since August 21. According to police, at around 2 a.m. on Tuesday, Takahata asked the woman to bring him a toothbrush and then pulled her inside his room, raping her.

Asked about the circumstances of learning of her son’s crime, Atsuko said she received a phone call from her management agency at around 3 p.m. on Tuesday, asking her to go to the office immediately and informing her that her son has been arrested in Gumma.

“I wasn’t able to meet Yuta or anyone else, and I had to rely on information from the media just like other people for two days,” the actress said. “I finally met him yesterday and I asked him if he realized how serious his crime is,” Takahata said through tears. “He just kept crying and apologizing,” she told the media.

“I wasn’t able to fully process (Yuta’s act) in my head,” the actress said, referring to the initial shock she experienced when she learned the details of the crime.

“It will take a lifetime to continue apologizing for what he did. I told him that he must realize what a grave act he has conducted, but I also told him that whatever happens I will always be his mother,” the actress said breaking out crying, apologizing once again.

“I hoped and wished so many times that this was some sort of a mistake. As a parent I would like to stand behind my son and back him up, but I know that I cannot do this,” Takahata said. “I should think from the victim’s perspective, imagining if she had been my precious daughter.”

Asked about her own schedule, Takahata replied that she will go ahead with her scheduled theater production from September.

For a full video of the press conference, click here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkfTvLkSHEk

© Japan Today

©2019 GPlusMedia Inc.


109 Comments
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Good. A genuine apology with no hemming and hawing.

19 ( +27 / -8 )

Why? Why should she apologize? She didn't do anything wrong? Her son is 22, an adult, he is responsible for his own actions, I feel sorry for her that she is getting dragged down for his behavior. The Japanese press knows no mercy.

35 ( +43 / -8 )

No need, Takahata-san. It was your son, not you.

20 ( +28 / -8 )

Strange to foreigners but in Japan you have to take responsibility if you are connected. A parent is always responsible for their child and a company or boss is always responsible for their employees here.

10 ( +22 / -12 )

Yes, this makes a mockery of free will. Her son did it, not her. Making her headline news will not help the victim. It is though an easy way to fill a tv schedule and get viewers that advertising can be sold to.

I saw a bit of it, and the questions about whether she had met or planned to meet the victim to apologize were especially grating. Is that what a rape victim is supposed to want? SMH.

5 ( +11 / -6 )

How unusual, and what a relief, to see an unequivocal admittance of sexual assault. She phrased it so clearly and so well - no excuses made, no blame thrown at the woman's door. Just, he did it, it's wrong, it's despicable, it's a serious crime.

23 ( +26 / -3 )

Shouldn't we hear the son's version of events before rushing to judgment?

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

What I found interesting was that when asked a question about the details of the rape, she announced that she had been told they weren't allowed to talk about the details of the incident, and if they did, she wouldn't be allowed to see him again.

That doesn't seem right to me.

3 ( +12 / -9 )

A parent is always responsible for their child even if their child is a grown adult, legally allowed to make their own decisions and is responsible for those decisions in the eye of the law. No wonder so many adults never grow up here, and the birth rate is so low, just too many burdens both culturally and financially in Japan to even contemplate having children.

0 ( +8 / -8 )

WTF Why does the poor mother have to take the spot light for a over 20y.o son. This guys life is well and truly over and i for one think he deserves everything he will get. Hope they put him on the suicide watch list, dont want him taking the easy way out.

-5 ( +8 / -13 )

She raised him and therefore feels responsible. That's just the way things are there. I find it interesting that in America, when somebody does something horrible, the first thing people bash on are the parents for raising such a monster. Yet with this article, so many people say she shouldn't have to apologize.

12 ( +16 / -4 )

So lemme see if I got this right, the son who is an adult commits a SERIOUS CRIME and the mother feels the need to apologize in hopes of what? Getting sympathy ? Well maybe her fame will get him a SUSPENDED SENTENCE,where is the outrage though?

-12 ( +5 / -17 )

Strange to foreigners but in Japan you have to take responsibility if you are connected. A parent is always responsible for their child

That's pretty much the gist of it. It's just as strange to them that a parent wouldn't take responsibility for their children's wrongdoings in the West.

So lemme see if I got this right, the son who is an adult commits a SERIOUS CRIME and the mother feels the need to apologize in hopes of what? Getting sympathy ?

It wasn't in the hopes of getting anything. She did it because it's what one is supposed to do in Japan.

8 ( +15 / -7 )

@ thepersoniamnowAug.

Strange to foreigners but in Japan you have to take responsibility if you are connected. A parent is always responsible for their child and a company or boss is always responsible for their employees here.

Interesting point, this help me to understand the lack of maturity and accountability here, thanks.

-4 ( +9 / -13 )

Interesting point, this help me to understand the lack of maturity and accountability here, thanks.

It also explains the lack of accountability in the west when parents don't apologize for their children's wrongs.

It goes both ways.

-4 ( +14 / -18 )

also please keep in mind her public tears are very likely to lead to a much more lenient sentence as the judges will be very unlikely to make the public figure mother who is so contrite suffer more. having famous parents is very helpful.

2 ( +9 / -7 )

Doesn't shock me at all. I see that as a simple gesture of solidarity, compassion and understanding to another woman ' I share your pain' sort of thing.

I would think that most women/mums, J or western, would do/feel the same. Only difference is Atsuko is a household name hence the particular media attention.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

these apologise by parents on behalf of their adult children is pure show and nothing to do with taking responsibility.

Ive experienced it first hand. In 2004 I was involved in a serious car accident with my wife which resulted in her hospitalised for 3 weeks. The other drive a 25yr old was racing another car at the time lost control and crashed into our vehicle and was clearly at fault. The parents came to the hospital and apologised etc etc. A few weeks after my wife had checked out of the hospital she proceeded to contact the family and the guy about insurance over the accident, which their reply was that he had none and had no money to pay. Months went by with repeated apologise they continually stated they had no money. To take the claim to court would involve many millions of yen legal fees with no guarantee of actually getting any compensation from him or the family.

Anyways as fate would have it our insurance company contacted us about 6months after wed almost given up hope and said that they'd payout the hospital costs (about 1 million yen) as well as compensation about 1.5miilion yen, better than nothing. But only because the guy and his family had continually avoided negotiating with us. Ironically if they had negotiated and agreed on a settlement it would have been substantially less that what our insurance company would likely be chasing him for reimbursement of our payout. Insurance companies have far more resources to get payment from the uninsured.

My whole point is this, you can be apologised too until the cows come home, but it basically just words and means nothing unless those responsible are willing to offer monetary compensation or their time offered to charity if they have no money. Words are cheap, action speak a thousand words!

6 ( +12 / -6 )

she is not taking responsibility for what her son did. i guess she is apologising as a mother who feels responsible for what/how her kid turn out to be. anyway, these things are just "protocols" in japan. don't try to make sense out of it as it is a cultural thing. you just have to take it as it is.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

What I found interesting was that when asked a question about the details of the rape, she announced that she had been told they weren't allowed to talk about the details of the incident, and if they did, she wouldn't be allowed to see him again. That doesn't seem right to me.

if her son told her a lie, and she gives that info to the press, it could harm the prosecutor's case and create bias for potential jurors. it seems perfectly right to me.

11 ( +11 / -0 )

It's like DSK all over again. Except he didn't apologise.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It's not just whether her son tells her a lie and repeats it, it's also whether her son tells her a truth that they later want to deny. Best to say nothing. I can understand that she is legitimately upset. This will impact her career too.

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Absolutely no reason why she should be involving herself in this. It's a press conference and she's apologizing to the press for the actions of someone else???

OK, well allow me to apologize publicly for this too. Takahata's son's actions are despicable and so please allow me to apologize for all the pain and trouble he has caused the victim.

See, meaningless.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Kobe White Bar owner,

I agree with you on that! At the same time I find some aspects of Japanese culture to be quite more mature than their western counterparts as well. Perhaps you being a white bar owner in Kobe noticed how alcohol doesn't incite regular violence and riots like in some places lol.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

@ thepersoniamnow

Yes booze bring out regular violence in say Australia or the UK, but this happened at 2am and I would bet he was just falling in from a night out drinking so.....

-3 ( +6 / -9 )

In Asia, a family member's deeds are either a shame or glory to the entire family. Father's debt is the son's responsibility to bear, son's misdeeds are the parents' shame. One of the reasons why Asian parents sacrifice their retirement funds for their kids' higher education. It's drilled into the bones of every Asians, "Do not bring shame to the family".

4 ( +7 / -3 )

Strange to foreigners but in Japan you have to take responsibility if you are connected. A parent is always responsible for their child and a company or boss is always responsible for their employees here.

But politicians in power can pass off their gaffs and mistakes to underlings.

8 ( +9 / -1 )

OK, well allow me to apologize publicly for this too. Takahata's son's actions are despicable and so please allow me to apologize for all the pain and trouble he has caused the victim.

See, meaningless.

If you aren't his father, then yes, it is meaningless.

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

“I should think from the victim’s perspective, imagining if she had been my precious daughter.”

Let's hope she keeps the same sentiment when he is sentenced. He is the punk of the very worst kind! Deprivation of liberty, kidnapping and rape! He should be looking at 20 years in the slammer and I hope he gets it! Sadly though, his status of fame and admissions of regret will play heavily on his sentencing. He will only be tried on the worst offence and, because it is his firs offence, he will get off very lightly. Possibly only 3-5 years (or less) depending on how well he plea bargains.

0 ( +4 / -4 )

One of the reasons why Asian parents sacrifice their retirement funds for their kids' higher education. It's drilled into the bones of every Asians, "Do not bring shame to the family". So dont do anything wrong or youll bring the whole family down with you! its no wonder everybody just wants to toe the line and not stand out for fear of the repercussions or stigmatisation of them and their families. Not an environment thatll breed individualism or creative thinkers is it. Wow and you can understand with the cultural and added financial pressures why so many Japanese lose their minds or commit suicide. Yet many people seem to think these cultural norms are a good thing! compared to what!?

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Strange to foreigners but in Japan you have to take responsibility if you are connected.

That's pretty much the gist of it. It's just as strange to them that a parent wouldn't take responsibility for their children's wrongdoings in the West.

If you actually look at the comments on the Yahoo Japan article about this, you'll find that the majority of them are saying the same things as everyone else on here: that it is ridiculous and absurd that she is apologizing for the actions of her adult son. http://news.yahoo.co.jp/pickup/6212323

4 ( +5 / -1 )

papigiulio

Like it or not, this is how things work in Japan. Parents take full responsibility for their children's actions just like a company president has to apologize at a press conference for a subordinate's actions. This also helps to explain why parents will also kill their own children so as not to be a burden on others (= the world). She had to apologize for her son causing serious trouble for many people, especially the victim. In other cases where (usually) a son has committed a brutal murder, the parents may even kill themselves out of shame.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

This is not an Asian or Japanese thing. In the US many times after shooting etc. the parents are on the news apologizing for their children's stupidity as well.

10 ( +11 / -1 )

Yet many people seem to think these cultural norms are a good thing! compared to what!?

How about rampant drug addiction, crime, violence and gangs as a starter?

If you actually look at the comments on the Yahoo Japan article about this, you'll find that the majority of them are saying the same things as everyone else on here

The comments by the posters on Japanese news sites are about as representative of Japanese people as the comments on JT are of foreigners in Japan - that is to say 'not very'.

0 ( +7 / -7 )

Strangerland - even if I was his father, it's still meaningless.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Like it or not, this is how things work in Japan. Parents take full responsibility for their children's actions just like a company president has to apologize at a press conference for a subordinate's actions. This also helps to explain why parents will also kill their own children so as not to be a burden on others (= the world). She had to apologize for her son causing serious trouble for many people, especially the victim. In other cases where (usually) a son has committed a brutal murder, the parents may even kill themselves out of shame.

you say this like its something that to be proud of or admired!? genital mutilation is a cultural norm in some countries doesn't make it just, right or acceptable in the 21st century. The wrongful actions of the few doesn't outweigh the rights of the many, even if its hidden behind cultural norms.

Moderator: Please repost without the reference to genital mutilation which is irrelevant to this discussion.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Strangerland - even if I was his father, it's still meaningless.

Not to the Japanese.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

How about rampant drug addiction, crime, violence and gangs as a starter? those arnt cultural norms, theyre life choices. When your forced to do something you don't agree with or doesn't seem just, but must do it because your born into a culture that expects it from you, doesn't sound very free does it. You make it sound like gangs, violence, drug use doesnt exist in Japan LOL

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Shouldn't we hear the son's version of events before rushing to judgment?

We already have. He's already admitted to it.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

I don't even want to imagine how this feels, seeing the person you painstakingly brought into this world becoming a criminal. This woman must be broken inside.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

I don't even want to imagine how this feels, seeing the person you painstakingly brought into this world becoming a criminal. This woman must be broken inside.

I felt really bad for her watching her on TV this morning. She looked entirely distressed.

And some of the questions they asked her were downright disrespectful I thought. "Did you ever notice anything sexually abnormal about your son" and stuff like that.

5 ( +8 / -3 )

Poor mum! I can't imagine the shock she'd be in dealing with this in private, but having to do it in public as well..

1 ( +2 / -1 )

"Why? Why should she apologize? She didn't do anything wrong? Her son is 22, an adult, he is responsible for his own actions, I feel sorry for her that she is getting dragged down for his behavior. The Japanese press knows no mercy."

So, if it were your son, you'd feel no compulsion to express some form of apology? Apology is also an expression of empathy and sympathy, it is not solely meant as taking full responsibility, but, being that this was her son, it would be hard for her not to feel some responsibility, a feeling that maybe you didn't do enough to instill decency in your child, even if in fact you were a fine parent who did the best you could. I know that's what I would feel...

4 ( +6 / -2 )

What an interesting story about Takahata Atsuko.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

Even if her son admits his guikt, he still has to be put to trial. Therefore public comments on his case, especially by a family member, are unacceptable.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Some funny ideas about responsibility here. Of course she feels some responsibility, she hasn't committed the crime but the son she bore and brought up has. She clearly has empathy and a reasonable moral compass and must be asking herself where she went wrong. Seems thoroughly decent to me.

I do have a worry that her son appears convicted before the process of law has taken its course. It's a long term criminal justice system problem that makes real justice, for victims and crims, hard to come by in Japan.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

It's one of the reasons for the low crime rate in Japan. You commit a crime, your whole family will suffer, not just you.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

@takobeya Did you just say low crime rate in Japan?? Just look at the crime section on JT , atleast these are the ones that made it to the media ...,

-3 ( +3 / -6 )

The immense grief of a Mother. Deeply impressed with her humility and love.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I think she is a good decent person and a good mother, but the dad is no- where to be seen. I lay money she was forbidden by the dad for this public apology. So I take it that the dad is a Mr Aso supporter and is like his son.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

It is not so unusual for American parents to apolgize for the misdeeds of thier adult children. After all, it is (was?) from parents that children learn the difference between right and wrong.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Japan T, "It is not so unusual for American parents to apolgize for the misdeeds of thier adult children. "

Exactly. All the people who are so obsessed with making this an "only in Japan/Asia" thing must never actually observe media from other countries. Maybe there aren't many press conferences such as Takahata's and just released statements are more common, especially if the parents aren't public figures. But that's true in Japan too. But in a case such as this one, when so many people have been majority inconvenienced in addition to the suffering of the victim, it would be seen as callus and irresponsible.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I'm really not sure what's so hard to understand. They are not your average Joe Blow and his mum. They're in the public eye and his foot in the door to fame is thanks to his mother's celebrity. Meiwaku. An enormous amount of meiwaku and inconvenience for both their agents and co and everyone involved in anything they work on. She seemed very sincere in her comments re the victim but there can be no doubt today's press conference is mostly to appologise for the inconvenience. And really, how can you expect anything less? We sure like to cling to the 'it takes a village' line...until something goes wrong and then it's every deviant for themselves, right?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Did you just say low crime rate in Japan?? Just look at the crime section on JT , at least these are the ones that made it to the media

"Low" is not a synonym for "zero".

The comments by the posters on Japanese news sites are about as representative of Japanese people as the comments on JT are of foreigners in Japan - that is to say 'not very'.

I would like to believe you are right but if you are I have to wonder why such an unrepresentative group gravitates to sites such as this that let them make the comments that they do.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

Remarkable, Japanese actress Atsuko Takahata, 61, in the course of a press conference lasted for 70 minutes has been allowed to undermine the principle of jurisprudence. Ei incumbit probatio qui dicit, the presumption of innocence. Atsuko Takahata, 61 has by public notification of private conversations with the defendant, her son declared a presumption of guilt, prejudicing any future judicial proceedings.

Japanese actress Atsuko Takahata, 61 is not express regret for her son, Atsuko Takahata is attempting to circumvent the judicial process of the criminal justice system.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

I would like to believe you are right but if you are I have to wonder why such an unrepresentative group gravitates to sites such as this that let them make the comments that they do.

Because they can. Previous generations would have just gotten drunk and complained at the local gaijin bar to whomever would listen. Now these people have a place where they can vent to the world.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

itsonlyrocknroll,

Did you miss the fact that her son, upon his arrest, and days before she was able to meet him, admitted to police that he committed the crime (although claiming he didn't plan it)? Also that police reported that confession to the public before the mother-son meeting?

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Hi Educator60, All I am advocating is letting the legal process reach a conclusion, let the defendant enter a plea, answer to the criminal charge in court. if found guilty then hang him from a lamppost. Rape is a heinous crime. Atsuko Takahata 61 apology is presumptive of any ruling.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

itsonlyrocknroll,

"let the defendant enter a plea, answer to the criminal charge in court."

I highly doubt her press conference will prevent that.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Hi Educator60, I am afraid It would in any EU or US federal judicial system for the reasons I have already stated.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

And some of the questions they asked her were downright disrespectful I thought. "Did you ever notice anything sexually abnormal about your son" and stuff like that.

Turns out I'm not the only one who thought that: http://news.yahoo.co.jp/pickup/6212391

1 ( +3 / -2 )

“I should think from the victim’s perspective, imagining if she had been my precious daughter.”

If only there were more people like here.

1 ( +3 / -2 )

Parental (familial) responsibility for the behavior of their children (members) is normal. We in the West, particularly we from the English speaking West -- with our emphasis on individual liberty -- are the outliers. In today's world. In human history.

Not that I think it a bad thing. I am very glad to be an American. But before I judge another civilization's attitudes here, I remind myself that:

Crime rates in Japan are some of, if not the, lowest in the world. While at the same time having one the highest population density in the world. That is quite an accomplishment.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

That is fair enough Educator60, I question the motivation and reasoning for Atsuko Takahata, 61, 70 minute press conference.

Details of conversations between her son should never be revealed, as could provide or brief prosecution material to the media. Inevitably this will lead to decisions of guilt or innocence being made in the context of trial by media before due process of law.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

Now, as an American, I think Japan would benefit from greater due process.

The mother's apology really makes the matter of calling Takahata's rape 'alleged' is moot.

She confessed for him.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Black Sabbath, "She confessed for him."

Again, he confessed for himself immediately after his arrest.

BTW, her visit with her son was actually a visit by three, Atsuko, her daughter, and Yuta's management agency president. The length of the visit was 15 min and they were prohibited from discussing details of the alleged incident. Most of the conversation was the president explaining to Yuta how people are jumping hoops through finding substitutes for his scheduled jobs, reshooting scenes of projects already completed (such as one to be broadcast tomorrow) or the movie in process etc.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

Again, he confessed for himself immediately after his arrest.

According to the police, yes.

Question: did he have a lawyer with him? At any time?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

The Government of Japan is a signatory to Universal Declaration of Human Rights

UN Human Rights Instruments.....

Scroll down .....Universal Declaration of Human Rights Adopted and proclaimed by General Assembly resolution 217A (III) of 10 December 1948.....

http://www.mofa.go.jp/policy/human/

Japanese actress Atsuko Takahata, public disclosures are prejudicial to articles 6,10,11,12. for her son to receive a fair trial. Atsuko Takahata is in contempt along with her management agency for aiding and abetting as an accessory.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

itsonlyrockandroll

Japanese courts do not recognize the supremacy of such treaties/agrements when they particulars conflict with Japanese law.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Hi Black Sabbath Clearly there is no ratification in law. Guidelines are either non existent or obtuse enough for the Judiciary to make arbitrary judgements open to appeals. This press conference was an appalling travesty to justice for all parties. A mockery of the entitled to full equality and a fair public hearing by an independent and impartial tribunal, in the determination of his rights and obligations and of any criminal charge against him

1 ( +2 / -1 )

This press conference was an appalling travesty to justice for all parties.

Seems that way to me. But what do I know?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

A whole bunch of advisers has probably been going through how to damage control this mess, finally finding no other way out. May I say this time. Not likely it was the first time he has done something like this. How many fans has suffered this mans perversity?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

itsonlyrocknroll, "Japanese actress Atsuko Takahata, public disclosures are prejudicial to articles 6,10,11,12. for her son to receive a fair trial. Atsuko Takahata is in contempt along with her management agency for aiding and abetting as an accessory."

Don't forget her daughter was involved also. And a lawyer it seems as at the press conference she declined to answer some questions on the grounds of having been advised not to with the implication it was by a lawyer (or possibly police). So who has the right/ability to charge them under the provisions you mention? Can you ensure they are charged? I'd be very interested in the outcome of such a trial.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Previous generations would have just gotten drunk and complained at the local gaijin bar to whomever would listen. Now these people have a place where they can vent to the world.

Or, as has been said, the Internet has allowed the village idiot to go global.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Meiwaku. An enormous amount of meiwaku and inconvenience for both their agents and co and everyone involved in anything they work on.

He was supposed to appear in a film of some kind on 24 Hour Television and they've had to yank it and redo it on less than a week's notice. Worse ( cost wise) is NHK having to redo the scenes in Sanadamaru that he's in, scheduled to be broadcast in October. They've already wrapped up shooting it, now they have to get everybody back ( screwing up their current schedules) to reshoot. I hope it doesn't entail rebuilding parts of the set. What a mess.

. Japanese actress Atsuko Takahata, public disclosures

The police made the announcement, and the press descended. Do you think she could just do nothing? As mentioned above, she was not allowed to answer questions regarding the crime itself. He said he did it.

3 ( +3 / -0 )

Details of conversations between her son should never be revealed, as could provide or brief prosecution material to the media.

She was told explicitly not to discuss details of the case with her son, and therefore did not. Therefore any conversations between her and her son were not specific to the case, and the details are therefore non-prejudicial to the media.

Question: did he have a lawyer with him? At any time?

No. Not that I've verified that, but access to a lawyer during question is not a right in Japan, and if I recall correctly, suspects are not even allowed to have a lawyer present during questioning.

Or, as has been said, the Internet has allowed the village idiot to go global.

So true.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

. Or, as has been said, the Internet has allowed the village idiot to go global.

So true.

Worse, the guy on the street corner yelling at passers by has gone global.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Due process in Japan?

2 ( +2 / -0 )

“He just kept crying and apologizing,”........

I don't have knowledge of criminal law outside financial/corporate governance. This one snippet, a detail of an exchange between mother and son is an admission of liability, an indication of mens rea guilty mind. Struggling to understand the reasoning behind the press conference, when a statement to the media though an attorney would have sufficed until criminal proceedings had run their course.

Just a thought, not suggesting the police coerced a confession.

Criminal justice in Japan - Forced to confess....

http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21679472-suspects-japanese-police-cells-are-far-too-vulnerable-abuse-forced-confess

1 ( +1 / -0 )

I don't have knowledge of criminal law outside financial/corporate governance. This one snippet, a detail of an exchange between mother and son is an admission of liability, an indication of mens rea guilty mind

Not necessarily. This is Japan, where causing troubles (迷惑) is to be apologized for, regardless of whether the person is right or wrong in the confrontation. This could very likely be an apology for being part of an incident at all, even if he believes it was not a rape that he was involved in.

Struggling to understand the reasoning behind the press conference, when a statement to the media though an attorney would have sufficed until criminal proceedings had run their course.

Not in Japan. In incidents like this, when the parents/spouse/whatever are celebrities, a public press-conference by the parents is expected. It happens literally every time.

It happened with Mino Monta when his son got caught stealing. And it happened with the wife of the guy who got caught with stimulants and another woman in a love hotel a couple of months back. It's how things are done in Japan. A statement to the media is not sufficient in the eyes of the public.

4 ( +5 / -1 )

this.. smell fishy

-4 ( +0 / -4 )

Please tell me this isn't true, a friend just told me that if Yuta Takahata apologizes to the woman/victim in court he will probably be left go with no prison time? I find this hard to believe buy friend who was born in Japan and left at age 30 says it happens all the time.

bec

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Question: did he have a lawyer with him? At any time? lawyers can only be present during interrogations at the invitation of the police. question should be was the whole interrogation process recorded. If you ever get into a situation that your being interrogated by J police, SAY NOTHING, unless the whole interrogation is recorded or you have a lawyer present.

5 ( +5 / -0 )

I strongly think she has nothing to do with his crime since he is over 20 years old. no idea how can she fix everything around. she just epitomizes from heaven to hell at a moment. so pitty.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

The reporter who asked Takahata questions about whether her son had an unusually strong sex drive or any perversions has apologized for that after being roundly criticized on the Internet.

7 ( +7 / -0 )

Only in Japan would-6 you get a famous mother coming out to make a televised public statement over her son's appalling and abhorrent crime. We know HE did it and yet the press hound her like dogs on heat. She has nothing to apologize for. Her son has and then thrown in prison.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Only in Japan would-6 you get a famous mother coming out to make a televised public statement over her son's appalling and abhorrent crime.

I'm not sure if that's true - I could see this potentially happening elsewhere in Asia as well. Does anyone know if it does?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Only in Japan would you get a famous mother coming out to make a televised public statement

Not only. The son of a French minister has been arrested (ganster, he took 3 yrs) and she has done a pressconf saying roughly the same words as this actress, shame for her family, empathy for victims, so sorry about public trouble... As celebrities, they would be asked all day long if they did not make a statement on TV. You'd do what in the situation ?

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Poor mother. Taking responsibility for the actions of an errant son. So the culprit was pretty much born w/ a silver spoon. He let fame and prestige get the better of him, leading to the ''I need a toothbrush'' incident. In her tearful apology, Atsuko admitted that her son is somewhat unfamiliar w/ the opposite sex, but never in her wildest dreams thought he could be so ''foolish''- her words. She stated that her daughter- Yuta's sister- and mama would continue to love him no matter what. All I could think of was how would he feel if someone did that to his sister?

2 ( +3 / -1 )

How about rampant drug addiction, crime, violence and gangs as a starter? these aren't cultural traits, theyre life choices. drug addiction crime violence and gangs are certainly not things Japan is immune to.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

It's one of the reasons for the low crime rate in Japan. You commit a crime, your whole family will suffer, not just you. well if its as logical as that then the families should share a prison cell with their guilty family members. To make an innocent person suffer because they're related to a guilty person is just plain morally wrong, and a form of cultural abuse. But as we know culture has a habit of blinding those imprisoned in its embrace.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

these aren't cultural traits, theyre life choices.

And?

drug addiction crime violence and gangs are certainly not things Japan is immune to.

No, but the feelings of social responsibility, and the knowledge that their bad actions can cause negative problems for their family, company, school or whatever, keep people more in line.

You can't just analyze a single point of culture and criticize it without looking at the culture as a whole and seeing what all the effects of it are. It seems crazy to many Westerners that a child may have to apologize for their children's actions, but the other side of this phenomenon is less drugs, less crime, less violence and less gangs.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

if its as logical as that then the families should share a prison cell with their guilty family members.

That makes about no sense whatsoever. There is no should about the culture being this way, there just is.

To make an innocent person suffer because they're related to a guilty person is just plain morally wrong

Maybe in the West. In the East, it's how things work. You seem to be claiming cultural superiority based on this, but an Japanese person could turn that cultural superiority back on you and point out how your culture is rife with drugs, violence and crime.

-3 ( +0 / -3 )

to make an innocent person suffer because they're related to a guilty person

I imagine she's suffering already.

The father of that university rapist Brock Turner wrote the open letter saying his son didn't deserve punishment, parents playing down the severity of their children's crimes - that's how I see the 'Western' version of this: rejecting responsibility, refusing to acknowledge harm was done.

I think I prefer the cultural norm as represented by Ms Takahata. She acknowledges, and hopes her son accept responsibility.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

So the word is he admitted it so no more "alleged"? Someone asked if a lawyer was present. In the US even when they know you did it the lawyers want to protect you and don't want you to admit anything. Recently all over the news a high school kid got no jail time after violating 2 girls because the judge wanted him to experience college normally. Judges/parents/lawyers all in collusion to keep jail time low for their kids who just made a "mistake". No matter how much alcohol I and many men would never have done anything like this.

If he admitted what he did right off with no lawyer, good on him. If he actually did it and wants to accept responsibility why need a slick lawyer?

1 ( +1 / -0 )

So the word is he admitted it so no more "alleged"?

Until it's proven in court, it's alleged. He as allegedly confessed - a court will have to look at that confession and determine whether it's legitimate, and whether the facts behind it support the confession.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Why are so many here whining about Takahata's mom apologizing because of her sons crime? That's how it works in Japanese culture. Their culture does not have to comply with your idea of right and wrong. Thought most on this site were big advocates of multiculturalism - well, this is it. Accept it and try to restrain yourself from telling other people how they should organize their societies.

-2 ( +2 / -4 )

problems for their family, company, school or whatever, keep people more in line. so its all about keeping people in line!? at what cost , self expression, individualism, creative thinkers, strong wills unafraid to speak their thoughts at the repercussions that may hold. Social tranquility is just a form of control, and you can see in J society that the average Taro really has no say in how the country should be run by those in power. Those at the top can do as they choice, have no fear of upheaval, unrest if the public is pacified and controlled in the name of social tranquility. Wolves leading the sheep.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

so its all about keeping people in line!?

Who claims it was designed that way? It's not 'all about' anything, it is what it is.

at what cost , self expression, individualism, creative thinkers, strong wills unafraid to speak their thoughts at the repercussions that may hold.

And at the benefit of low crime, less rampant drug use, less gangs, and a safer society.

You can't isolate one side of it without considering the other.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

He should be the one being subjected to press conference and questions

0 ( +0 / -0 )

@Strangerland:

And at the benefit of low crime, less rampant drug use, less gangs, and a safer society. You can't isolate one side of it without considering the other.

Had to jump in on this one as I rarely agree with Strangerland. Japanese culture is very collectivist in nature. It is natural for someone from the West to be repelled by the idea that a relative would feel obliged to apologize and take on the guilt for another family members wrong-doing. Although Western culture is currently undergoing a massive upheaval towards a belief system involving collective guilt with respect to selective issues the belief in individual responsibility remains strong with traditional Americans. This split in world view is in my opinion one of the reasons why Americans seem to hate each other so much lately.

The idea that everyone in the family is shamed by the misguided actions of a single member is an important mechanism for social order in mono-culture Japan. When I am in Japan I accept that as the way things are and act accordingly. When outside of Japan in my home country I am naturally more comfortable with the idea that each individual is responsible for themselves and any misdeeds should not necessarily reflect badly on the others in one's family, religion, race, etc.

The idea of collective guilt in Japan has obvious benefits as seen in the relative orderliness of society compared to America and other Western nations. I personally do not wish to see individual responsibility go by the wayside but even in America, that ship is leaving port and the collectivist control freaks are taking over. In Japan this works just fine. In multi-cultural America it will only create more chaos.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Had to jump in on this one as I rarely agree with Strangerland.

Even a broken clock is right twice a day! I'll leave you to decide which of us is that clock ;)

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

It's inappropriate to hold this press conference. The victim is going to see this every time she turns on the TV or looks at a paper. I will be interested to see what sentence Takahata will get. I assume he's admitted to the crime, otherwise mummy wouldn't be apologising in this way. I wonder if he'll come out with the "I was drink/stressed" excuse as his get out of jail free card.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Even a broken clock is right twice a day! I'll leave you to decide which of us is that clock ;)

Had to give you a thumbs up on that! Wait that's two in row. That's enough for a while....

1 ( +2 / -1 )

To be fair, if you imagine that Will Smith's son got caught for something like this, he would likely arrange a public apology along the notes of this so it's not really another Japanese idiosyncrasy. And regarding her not being allowed to "see her son again" if she discussed the case details, it could simply mean the police don't want public discussion of details she might have of her son's view of the case to contaminate the case, or it could be his lawyer, talent agency's lawyers or agents themselves. There are all sorts of agendas and keeping your mouth shut about a starting trial is probably a good idea.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

I get the requirement for mom to plead mea culpa and suffer the public humiliation. Hopefully she will take it to the next level and publicly wash her hands of this kid and leave him to face the music while she moves on with her life.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

papigiulio. It's Japanese culture. The parent genuinely felt they were responsible for their children activity regardless of their age. She went to publicly apologize to victim and peoples after talking with her son. That must be her son had confessed he raped 40 years old hotel employee. Poor mother it was humiliation for her and it will never end. What make 22 years old Yuta Takahata to rape 40 years old hotel employee? Was he drunk that time or just raping woman for sexual pleasure?

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

Sad situation for the unsuspecting mother, the actress. If this incident took place in the US, the son, Yuta, would claim he was absolutely innocent, the victim made him do it, and the mother would claim her son an angel who wouldn't hurt a fly. Thank you for the Japanese who accept responsibility right away and don't play phony legal games.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Well I guess me previous comment was accurate after all!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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