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Americans apologize to Tokyo court for role in Ghosn escape

135 Comments
By YURI KAGEYAMA

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I remember them saying to judge in USA not to send them to Japan because they will be tortured, beaten, possibly killed.

...... Now that they arrived in Japan. They are sorry. Regret their mistakes. Ok buddy.

Michael Taylor, a former Green Beret, knew exactly what he was doing.

Please punish this people, Ghosn already got away. Get out of jail, living the good life writing a book about it with a Movie Deal Coming Soon.

-47 ( +28 / -75 )

Free the Taylors!

4 ( +42 / -38 )

In the j-justice that's the only way out:

Acting apologetic and look for the minimum sentence.

Any intention to fight back will end up with jail time.

38 ( +56 / -18 )

“I didn’t know much about Japan. All I know is that the Japanese are the friendliest people I’ve ever bumped into,” he said.

Ghanian man or Srilankan woman that died during detention will say different thing.

https://www.straitstimes.com/asia/east-asia/a-sri-lankans-tragic-death-in-japan-casts-a-harsh-spotlight-on-controversial-refugee

I’m sorry,” Michael Taylor, a former Green Beret said, bowing and holding back sobs.

Sorry for what, helping someone to escape and exposing to the world that Japan's hostage justice system is exist? People who should really sorry is people who did child abduction and still walk free in Japan while their extradition still not being processed.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Politics/Parental-child-abduction-places-Japan-on-blacklist

6 ( +30 / -24 )

Where is Ghosn when two people are being in court? Ghosn is laughing and doesn't care as long he is free.

Those two gentlemen knew what they did, and they decided to hel Ghosn. Now he is free and they are facing judgement.

Ghosn always he was innocent, but never there was proof. All documents were showing he was gelding back money.

It is true Japan is strict and most people think their country is good but America his is own problem were police put knees on people neck with death as results without a fair trail. Another example is that as a foreigner you don't want be in a jail in Indonesia or Philippines where circumstances are bad. Every country has their issues not only Japan. Just don't do crime in a foreign country and you may just be fine.

-11 ( +21 / -32 )

OK, they are saying what they need to say now. But look at this :

 he had been misinformed by Ghosn and his wife, Carole Ghosn..... Carole Ghosn told Taylor her husband was “tortured" and grilled in solitary confinement, he said.

According to Carlos Ghosn, his family was not involved at all.

But Carole... Carole... Carole...

Here, Taylor acknowleges that Mrs Ghosn was participating in the booking of that adventure trip. On more nail in the coffin of Carole's future life in the US.

7 ( +20 / -13 )

Might get them a minute off their sentence.But still going to be made an example of...harshly.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

Smart move no doubt. Showing remorse and willing to accept guilt is the fastest ways for lawyers to help you reduce your sentences. Everyone love a smooth trial and the more cooperative you are, the more lenient the judge get.

But i am kinda disappointed. I though these guys had plenty of training during their time in army and were use to intense situations. Expected them to be some hardcore guys that would never crack under any circumstance.

18 ( +26 / -8 )

"And the Oscar for best supporting actor in a drama goes to . . ."

21 ( +27 / -6 )

So his prison warders greet him with a big friendly ohayo gozaimasu every morning??

A likey story.

I somehow doubt japanese prison staff are the friendliest people you can meet.

You're not allowed to even look them in the eye

18 ( +25 / -7 )

If the purpose of the prosecution was to teach the accused a lesson it would have been smart to show remorse, unfortunately for them this is much bigger for the goverment of Japan than just punish their actions, It is not likely they will get any clemency.

6 ( +13 / -7 )

Taylor said he has been well treated in Japan.

Of course he has been treated well in Japan. The Japanese legal system has been exposed and eveybody is watching.

Carole Ghosn told Taylor her husband was “tortured" and grilled in solitary confinement, he said. Ghosn also said he was being mistreated, Taylor said.

Probably right. At that time the Japanese legal system had not been exposed and nobody was watching.

7 ( +23 / -16 )

Well, it usually works for japanese but I doubt their apology would seem sincere enough for japanese standards

0 ( +10 / -10 )

I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process and for the Japanese people. I’m sorry,

I'm sorry that I got extradidted to Japan, more like....

These guys would have known the risks of the mission when they accepted it, sureley it would have been priced into the fee. They certainly are tougher than Ghosn in accepting their fate, now they are just playing the game of an apology and sit out their jail time.

13 ( +18 / -5 )

Pleading guilty and expressing remorse is the only way to get off or receive a reduced sentence in Japan. Pleading innocence here will just prolong and make things worse. It’s Japan, you have to go along and play by their rules and customs.

17 ( +24 / -7 )

A former Green Beret bowing and holding back sobs. That must have been a spectacle. Now it’s time for the big fat rat in Lebanon to be brought to justice.

-6 ( +18 / -24 )

If the criminals confessed it means that they admit their crime and are guilty, send them to jail to learn their lesson..

Sorry silly Gohsnbelievers if you are still so naive to believe such a white collar criminal to calm your frustrations against Japan..

Open your eyes, stop naivety..

Sooner or later the big fat criminal rat will fall..

LOL !!..

-13 ( +13 / -26 )

Still, I’d rather be in a Japanese prison than an American one.

21 ( +30 / -9 )

I felt sorry for Ghosn in the beginning but I mean really, he’s a coward with money who betrayed everybody who helped him. He may have gotten away from the Japanese judicial system but he’s still in a jail. He’s stuck in a 3rd world country for the rest of his life, unless he wants to risk being extradited

10 ( +21 / -11 )

“After more than 400 days in jail, I have had a lot of time to reflect. I take full responsibility and deeply apologize. I am sorry," he said.

Translation:

After more than 400 days in jail and being harassed and tortured, I have had a lot of time to reflect. I take full responsibility and deeply apologize. I am sorry,"

Smart move no doubt. Showing remorse and willing to accept guilt is the fastest ways for lawyers to help you reduce your sentences. Everyone love a smooth trial and the more cooperative you are, the more lenient the judge get.

exactly. That's what they want. they want to break people and have them say whatever they want them to. Its just an extension of the Japanese bullying culture.

-1 ( +18 / -19 )

I'm just here to see what ghosn's ardent supporters would say

-3 ( +15 / -18 )

All I know is that the Japanese are the friendliest people I’ve ever bumped into,” he said.

And now they've got him for perjury.

6 ( +14 / -8 )

“After more than 400 days in jail, I have had a lot of time to reflect. I take full responsibility and deeply apologize. I am sorry," he said.

You feel only sorry for yourself, because USA, your own country, arrested you and extradited both of you to Japan. Welcome to jail.

-6 ( +12 / -18 )

Looks a lot like a forced "confession".

Probably advised by their lawyers to take that obligatory deep bow and show remorse.

Just looking at this one sentence made by Taylor makes me think "w.t.f.:

“I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process and for the Japanese people."

Guess most Japanese people can care less and are not that much interested in this case!

10 ( +17 / -7 )

"After more than 400 days in jail and being harassed and tortured, "

Where?

Ah, yes in the US of A.

I can't be Japan as they've "just" got there.

So, you're admitting detainees are harassed and tortured in the US.

Nice

0 ( +15 / -15 )

After more than 400 days in jail and being harassed and tortured, "

Where?

US and Japan

-8 ( +5 / -13 )

The rack again or confesses! J justice

Personal dignity is fickle and you can always retract the apology as it was made under duress.

0 ( +11 / -11 )

GaijinjlandToday 07:41 am JST

Still, I’d rather be in a Japanese prison than an American one.

Might be the better choice indeed, as Japanese prisons are known to be not overcrowded at all, no drugs available, very clean and violence-free.

What these two Taylors say makes some sense, they did not expect that from the Japanese prison system after their arrival from USA. They expected it worse than it is in reality. Obviously a stay in a Japanese prison is nicer than in any US jail.

16 ( +22 / -6 )

I can't be Japan as they've "just" got there.

Give me a waterboard, Dick Cheney and one hour and I'll have him confessing to the Sharon Tate murders.

-Jesse Ventura

Not saying they were waterboarded, but I'm willing to bet they were harassed and threatened and tortured in Japan.

So, you're admitting detainees are harassed and tortured in the US.

Duh! This news to you?!

-8 ( +8 / -16 )

Pleading innocence here will just prolong and make things worse.

Not all that different from the US in that sense. US federal courts also have a conviction rate in the high 90% category. The do this by threatening suspects with draconian prison terms unless they plea bargain and spare the state the bother of a trial. Plenty of innocent people take the deal and plead guilty.

Bottom line is this: You don't want to be nabbed by the criminal justice system in any country, because they are rarely about justice.

14 ( +20 / -6 )

Looks a lot like a forced "confession".

Probably advised by their lawyers to take that obligatory deep bow and show remorse.

Just looking at this one sentence made by Taylor makes me think "w.t.f.

exactly. no matter what the apologists here say.

-6 ( +8 / -14 )

Don't do the crime if you can't do the time.

5 ( +15 / -10 )

To the best of my knowledge they haven't seen the inside of a Japanese Jail as yet - Just the detention centre. You only get carted off to Fuchu once convicted.

No forced confession - as they have essentially pleaded guilty (sensibly) and will probably be deported upon sentencing (suspended sentence) and never see the inside of a Jail. Job done.

At the end of the day, this was only about Japan saving some face.

13 ( +21 / -8 )

Prosecutors have described details of bank transfers and bitcoin payments, alleging Ghosn paid the Taylors the equivalent of $1.3 million.

Is that all they received????

Pretty stupid to take a career ending job for only $1.3 million. If they were smart and understood the consequences, they should have taken at least 10 times the amount.

7 ( +9 / -2 )

At the end of the day, this was only about Japan saving some face.

very true

-3 ( +8 / -11 )

Reuter reported Michael Tylor testified " Both Carlos and Carole Ghosn told him it is not illegal in Japan to disappear under bail" Peter Tylor testified " I feel I got exploited”

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Smart move no doubt. Showing remorse and willing to accept guilt is the fastest ways for lawyers to help you reduce your sentences."

Indeed.

But i am kinda disappointed. I though these guys had plenty of training during their time in army and were use to intense situations. Expected them to be some hardcore guys that would never crack under any circumstance."

I,d guess part of the training would be to do (say) whatever is necessary to get out as quickly as possible.

They are following that to the tee i think.

No forced confession - as they have essentially pleaded guilty (sensibly) and will probably be deported upon sentencing (suspended sentence) and never see the inside of a Jail. Job done.At the end of the day, this was only about Japan saving some face."

Agreed.

11 ( +12 / -1 )

Sobbing wont help you now, Mr "Green Beret". I hope you and your boy are brushing up on that Nihongo, you should be fluent by the time you are released in 3-4 years.

Now, time for Japan and the Lebanese authorities to get Ghosn back for his day in court.

1 ( +14 / -13 )

The Taylors are playing their best move.

They can tell the truth as soon as they get out of here.

-3 ( +10 / -13 )

They are masters at this game, the Jgov are not, they will get off with a fine and a hand slap then deported and never allowed back into Japan, end of the story.

6 ( +11 / -5 )

Maybe the Taylors can hire some mercenaries to extract them from Japan in a box like they did for Ghosn???

7 ( +8 / -1 )

Let them go!

-13 ( +6 / -19 )

How long would the trial be if they claimed not guilty - weeks a month? Would they be found guilty anyway? Yes. Would the sentence be longer, once it finally started? Yes.

OTOH, if remorse was shown, nice things are said about the jail, courts, people, and some lite acting is performed, the guilty will come back in a few days and the sentence could be reduced, slightly. 6 months less is 6 months less, no matter how you see it. Do the time and get out of Japan ASAP. That's their goal.

I still wonder what penalties the police monitoring Ghosn earned for not noticing he left?

“I didn’t know much about Japan. All I know is that the Japanese are the friendliest people I’ve ever bumped into,” he said.

Doubtful. There's a difference between polite and friendly.

I've found it takes time to earn a friendship with most Japanese. Nothing wrong with that.

7 ( +10 / -3 )

This is all just a play that was probably set in motion some time ago when the JGov was negotiating the Taylors extradition to Japan. I would guess it went like this "You, The US, send us the 2 perps so that the Japanese judicial system doesn't look so bad and we will keep them here fed and happy for a few months, then they apologize in public and we will cut them loose." The Taylors will put this behind them, Japanese judicial system saves face and the US will look like they conform to the international agreements they did sign.

3 ( +7 / -4 )

I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process and for the Japanese people. I’m sorry,” Michael Taylor, a former Green Beret said, bowing and holding back sobs.

You have to ask yourselves, does this script look like an American would actually say these words in this way? Looks contrived.

3 ( +11 / -8 )

The Taylors are probably thinking "What would Tom Cruise do?".

4 ( +8 / -4 )

Lock up these vile criminals! They will see the power of Japan Justice Force soon!

-12 ( +10 / -22 )

@Michael Machida: No, Of course not - Written by their lawyer in exactly the right language to keep the judicial system happy and get them on a plane out of here as soon as possible. No need for the bold text, is there?

9 ( +13 / -4 )

@NippomGlory - No mate - They'll be seeing the cabin of US bound plane back to freedom.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Forced confessions, that's all.

The truth will. Come out after they will be released.

-10 ( +8 / -18 )

They should have praised the cherry blossoms, the sound of the cicadas (that one must be Japanese in order to truly hear), and the superior Japanese prison food. That would have gotten a few months shaved off their sentences, the Japanese eat that stuff right up.

-2 ( +9 / -11 )

He is a trained former Green Berets. Thats how they achieve the outcome - Stealth, deceit, fake, lie if needed.

Im sure his training kicked in, along with understanding that the best outcome is to admit guilt - the Japanese way (Cry, sob, bow etc).

Dont let their "act" deceit you about their clandestine ways!

3 ( +6 / -3 )

Truely sorry you would give back the money?

5 ( +9 / -4 )

If the Taylors are convicted, it will be interesting to see whether US authorities decide to seize the alleged $1.3 million reward (or whatever is left of it). Civil forfeiture laws in the US allow the government to confiscate the proceeds of overseas crime so long as the crime was punishable by at least 1 year in prison (which is the case here).

8 ( +11 / -3 )

They’ve definitely cut some sort of deal and have been asked to say / do what they’ve done…can’t blame them for this! They’ll be given a minimum or even a suspended sentence and deported back to the US! The bigger issue here is how the US actually threw them to the wolves ( this is a man who served his country in the past with honor ).

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Lawyers gave them great advice - just apologize, deep bows, show regret, shed a few tears and everything will be OK.

But lawyers failed to mention that this only works for elite Japanese with good connections.

It will be interesting to see what sentence they get...

3 ( +9 / -6 )

Taylors bowing and holding back sobs seems hurt JT small community big time.  I see them upright

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Other source reported his mouth and voice were shaking. If he is acting, he's really someone.

I still see them upright

0 ( +6 / -6 )

“I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process and for the Japanese people. I’m sorry,” Michael Taylor, a former Green Beret said, bowing and holding back sobs.

Well played! That statement is worthy of a suspended sentence and an academy award.

-4 ( +4 / -8 )

The truth will. Come out after they will be released.

I'm not sure what "truth" y'all are expecting. The fact that they helped a fugitive escape the country for money really isn't up for debate at this point. You can argue if their actions were right or wrong, but they did do those actions.

Are you maybe expecting them to get back to the US and then one of 'em pulls of their mask, Scooby Doo style, and it was Ghosn under there all along?

5 ( +7 / -2 )

"Ghosn always he was innocent, but never there was proof."

Albert,

not Ghosn has to proof his innocence but the prosecution has to proof his guilt and unless they don't, he's supposed to be innocent, also to Japanese laws. The justice apparatus just doesn't care about that legal standard.

-3 ( +4 / -7 )

Former Green Beret...holding back sobs......sure he was....

Typical kangaroo justice in Japan. They can't get Ghosn, so they'll throw the book at these two. I'm surprised the US extradited them, not often that happens.

I don't suppose Ghosn was doing anything that almost every other top CEO does/ is doing.....but hey, can't have a gaij in charge of Nissan for too long....

-2 ( +7 / -9 )

I have no doubt the Taylors were coached by his lawyers, but his decision was nevertheless correct (if belated). If anything, he was poorly served by his American lawyers, who told him they had a serious chance of getting him off in a case where the facts are relatively fixed and he's going off a technicality that won't work in his own country. Of course, maybe they told him the real odds but Taylor told them to fight the extradition anyway. I think all his Japanese lawyers had to do is explain to him that Professor Cleary isn't qualified for his post, what the real construction of Japanese law was and the background reasoning, and Taylor realized his only course was surrender.

As for what he'll get, let me put a bet for two years. They have to give him points for making a symbolic surrender, but he had spent MOST of the 400 days fighting the charges, including by impugning the Japanese legal system which obviously puts a damper on how repentant he is likely to be. Maybe if his American lawyer advised him to immediately accept extradition and he pleaded guilty, a bigger cut would be possible. But his crime was serious, as were said crime's consequences to Japan - it's way too much for a suspended sentence.

1 ( +6 / -5 )

All I know is that the Japanese are the friendliest people I’ve ever bumped into,” he said.

And now they've got him for perjury.

if you bump into a japanese on the street, they will most likely turn around slightly while half bowing, say sumimasen a few times, shyly avoid eye contact, bow again and then be on their way.

bump into someone in the US or some other place, they will likely turn around and get all puffy-chested, shout obscenities or even clock you one over the head, if youre lucky

nah, his claim is all good /s

-4 ( +5 / -9 )

“I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process and for the Japanese people. I’m sorry,”

Taylor said he has been well treated in Japan.

“I didn’t know much about Japan. All I know is that the Japanese are the friendliest people I’ve ever bumped into,” he said.

All of this sounds to me like the jpolice just taking a piss on them to get revenge for Ghosn making them look like like savages and their "justice system". I am sure their apology and everything else was written by the japanese police and made them say what they wanted the Americans to say! This is just a grand example of how far Japan will go to save face! Brandishing them before the Japanese public like Otto Frederick Warmbier to show their force. Dispicible!

-7 ( +4 / -11 )

All of this sounds to me like the jpolice just taking a piss on them to get revenge for Ghosn making them look like like savages and their "justice system". I am sure their apology and everything else was written by the japanese police and made them say what they wanted the Americans to say! This is just a grand example of how far Japan will go to save face! Brandishing them before the Japanese public like Otto Frederick Warmbier to show their force. Dispicible!

WELL SAID!

-10 ( +4 / -14 )

This is all just a play that was probably set in motion some time ago when the JGov was negotiating the Taylors extradition to Japan. I would guess it went like this "You, The US, send us the 2 perps so that the Japanese judicial system doesn't look so bad and we will keep them here fed and happy for a few months, then they apologize in public and we will cut them loose." The Taylors will put this behind them, Japanese judicial system saves face and the US will look like they conform to the international agreements they did sign.

The USgovt has no interest in these men. None. They weren't working for the govt at the time and don't care how long they spend in Japanese prison.

On the good side, crimes committed by US citizens while outside the US don't show up on any job application I've ever seen. Had they been tried and convicted inside the US, that would drastically alter the types of work they will ever be hired to perform. No desk jobs for them.

Every application I've see has "Have you been convicted of a crime in the USA?" as a question. Then they do an FBI/NSA background check ... send some agents out to the prior living locations, ask neighbors some questions, then the hiring is done. Clearly, these aren't stock-boy jobs.

5 ( +6 / -1 )

All I know is that the Japanese are the friendliest people I’ve ever bumped into,” he said.

If he had said the Japanese are the best human beings to have have lived, he could have had all charges dropped.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

“I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process and for the Japanese people. I’m sorry,” Michael Taylor, a former Green Beret said, bowing and holding back sobs.

Looks like a typical apology to be said here. Strongly recommended by his lawyer I am pretty sure

6 ( +8 / -2 )

Whatever it takes to help the J Justice system save face fellas. Subjugate yourselves, deep bows, written confessions, the whole kit and kaboodle performance. Do whatever it takes to keep them from getting their pound of flesh from you fellas. All about the face.

-2 ( +5 / -7 )

Japan should request the arrest of Ms Ghosn. She is obsiously the mastermind behind this.

If she thought her husband was not treated right she should fight in court like everyone else and not commiting a crime. Even if it was for a good purpose, we still dont know if Ghosn was innocence or not, she made an illegal act.

Bring her to justice and lets see if her coward husband will betray her also.

4 ( +9 / -5 )

If you can't do the time then........ we know the rest. Take it like a man.

You helped a foreigner escape judicial proceedings in this county, Its called obstruction of justice.

Which you were compensated handsomely for it. Now do your time and stop whining and sobbing for the courts and media. Stand on your own two. Be silent and humble here and then run the sentence and go home.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

Sorry silly Gohsnbelievers if you are still so naive to believe such a white collar criminal to calm your frustrations against Japan..

sorry silly Japan hostage justice believers, if you are so naive to think that hostage justice is actually not a human rights abuse then youd better find a better way to ease your frustrations that a gaijin outsmarted them.

Goodluck getting Ghosn out of Lebanon

LOL !!

-1 ( +8 / -9 )

Still, I’d rather be in a Japanese prison than an American one.

hell yeah J prison is like a holiday camp compared to the US.

You chances of leaving J prison alive and uninjured is far better than the US

8 ( +12 / -4 )

sorry silly Japan hostage justice believers, if you are so naive to think that hostage justice is actually not a human rights abuse then youd better find a better way to ease your frustrations that a gaijin outsmarted them.

Goodluck getting Ghosn out of Lebanon

LOL !!

Hear hear!!

-6 ( +5 / -11 )

Japan should request the arrest of Ms Ghosn. She is obsiously the mastermind behind this.

If she thought her husband was not treated right she should fight in court like everyone else and not commiting a crime. Even if it was for a good purpose, we still dont know if Ghosn was innocence or not, she made an illegal act.

Bring her to justice and lets see if her coward husband will betray her also.

One of a few sane posts which then would sound in vain to all these Ghosn defenders disguising themselves under not innocent until proven guilty but innocent no matter what

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Japan should request the arrest of Ms Ghosn. She is obsiously the mastermind behind this.

If she thought her husband was not treated right she should fight in court like everyone else and not commiting a crime. Even if it was for a good purpose, we still dont know if Ghosn was innocence or not, she made an illegal act.

Bring her to justice and lets see if her coward husband will betray her also.

One of a few sane posts which then would sound in vain to all these Ghosn defenders disguising themselves under not innocent until proven guilty but innocent no matter what

At least one thing has been proven that she is also guilty for this arrangement and J Justice had a good reason not to let them meet each other while he was detained.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

Mr Ghosn didn’t break as the Japanese interrogation continued.

And then he escaped- good!

-6 ( +6 / -12 )

I thinking anyone supporting Ghosn's escape should really take a look at the long term effects of this.

Anyone living in Japan like the fact you can leave your door open? Windows, relativity pretty much safe where ever you go. The organized crime syndicates and that element in this country keep to there own and fight and kill there own.

Like the fact you never see open drug use? Or drugs being sold openly around schools?

Like the fact you do not see needles and glass stems littering the ground everywhere or baggies?

No one in streets washing windows for change? I mean yes we have drugs here, But you need to go out and pursue drugs. On most occasions.

This may have been a corporate crime or not committed by Ghosn? We will never really know now? Will we? I would have liked to have seen Ghosn set free legally. Win his case. But this message he sends us by running like a coward. Shows hints of guilt.

This is not good for Japan. Others will come and commit crimes, and think they can get a way with what ever crime for profit scheme. The long road on this case that is where the damager will be done.

7 ( +12 / -5 )

Lol. A Green Beret won't cry. It was 100% all an act, and he pulled one over on the Judge(s).

0 ( +3 / -3 )

@BunkerBilly

Right you are. Best acting by a non actor.........

-2 ( +3 / -5 )

Some people don't understand the laws in Japan. Especially sentencing. How sorry you are for your actions play a big part in sentencing and leniency in Japan.

13 ( +13 / -0 )

He is being pragmatic. A true pragmatist is not afraid to be humiliated if it achieves the goal.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

siniestroToday 01:17 pm JST

Japan should request the arrest of Ms Ghosn. She is obsiously the mastermind behind this.

There is already an interpol red notice out asking for the arrest of Ms. Ghosn on the request of Japan.

Like her husband, despite she is being an US citizen, should she enter USA, she will be arrested and facing an extradition request from Japan - same like these Taylor father and son. She cannot even go back to her own country.

Ghosn, husband and wife, are now more or less locked in Lebanon, with nowhere to go.

Not a very safe place, in case of any hostile Hezbollah activity similar to Hamas, Israel will bomb this country out in no time.

1 ( +7 / -6 )

Their apologies will be followed by the seizure of the money?

1 ( +6 / -5 )

Another American and former top Nissan executive, Greg Kelly, is on trial in Tokyo on charges of under-reporting Ghosn’s compensation. Kelly says he is innocent and was only trying to pay Ghosn legally.

This is true, Greg Kelly is somehow the better one - Japanese prosecutors and US regulators agree with that,

In USA Kelly was fined only USD 100.000,- and banned from any executive job in US companies for 5 years - and in Japan he will likely get away easily with a lenient sentence, as he never violated his bail condition, was always co-operative with prosecutors, never took obviously kickback in return for his 'help' from Ghosn but did it for free, his wife was also questioned but all investigators agreed that she really knows nothing about the business of her husband, she is free to enter/leave Japan/USA anytime.

Greg Kelly is US citizen, is an US-lawyer himself and anything else but a poor man. He knows that he has to comply now and his chance to leave Japan as a free man relatively soon is fairly good.

Unlike the Taylors he is living with his wife in a comfortable house in a prime location in Tokyo on a rather low bail of yen 70 million - which will be returned to him after his case is over.

2 ( +8 / -6 )

Meanwhile, in Beirut, Ghosn is having his morning coffee and couldn’t care less.

10 ( +12 / -2 )

Some people don't understand the laws in Japan. Especially sentencing. How sorry you are for your actions play a big part in sentencing and leniency in Japan.

Yep. Correct! So cry like a baby, lay in the floor bowing and get a lighter sentence all while drinking in 1st class on the plane on the way home laughing with your buddy about how foolish you looked...but got another one over on them.

2 ( +6 / -4 )

Sorry I have not read all comments.

The Taylors just playing the Japanese way.

Be sure they don't believe a word of what they are saying.

We'll see that when they come back to their home country.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

“I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process

What else can they say? It is like show trial in CCP China or North Korea.

-5 ( +5 / -10 )

ZaphodToday 03:32 pm JST

“I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process

What else can they say? It is like show trial in CCP China or North Korea.

Sounds similar to a plea bargain in USA - I don't see much difference. Confess to something, true or not, and get away with a lenient sentence. No further investigation. Many criminals in USA are going this way as they cannot pay for highly professional lawyers and don't care if they have another criminal record or not.

The Taylors are not so rich people, wasted a lot of money to prevent their extradition from USA to Japan and likely are not able to pay anymore for their defence. Pay for what? Not much will happen to them anyway, within a year or so they will be back in the States if they accept to be convicted in Japan and do not appeal the sentence. So, why not, show up as crybabies and get out soon of Japan.

7 ( +11 / -4 )

Michael MachidaToday  09:39 am JST

I deeply regret my actions and sincerely apologize for causing difficulties for the judicial process and for the Japanese people. I’m sorry,” Michael Taylor, a former Green Beret said, bowing and holding back sobs.

You have to ask yourselves, does this script look like an American would actually say these words in this way? Looks contrived.

Of course not. It was obviously composed by their defense attorney.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

This really seems and perhaps proves that they are just pawns to be played with by an angry and disgraced ministry after the plane debacle. This at a court. Tokyo court. It is rather like a TV show.......

-5 ( +1 / -6 )

In point of fact, he jumped bail by himself...

1 ( +1 / -0 )

"At the end of the day, this was only about Japan saving some face."

No, it was/is not!

The main purpose is to prevent the setting of a Legal Precedent; that is OK to evade Court Proceedings by simply legging it.

Don't even get me started on that huge black box and its novel mode of Intercontinental transportation!

No amount of bowing should save their sorry asses.

1 ( +8 / -7 )

One or two of the reasoning to label the hostage justice have been just peeled off

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Either you so frustrated here and drunk or actually committed crimes and know better than anyone

Which one are you folks?

1 ( +5 / -4 )

Sounds similar to a plea bargain in USA - I don't see much difference. Confess to something, true or not, and get away with a lenient sentence. 

The USA may be worse. Though their conviction rate fall a little short of Japan's 99% (something like 93% for federal crimes and 80-something for state crimes), the US arrest rate and incarceration rate is off the charts - the worst in the world, far worse than even China and Russia.

Something approaching half of all American males will be arrested at some point in their life. In Japan, I would guess it's more like 1 or 2 guys in 100 ever getting arrested. Then there is the barbarity in some US prisons. America has far more people in prison per capita than any other country in the world.

I'll take my odds in Japan, thanks.

6 ( +10 / -4 )

That's how I got off. Japanese prosecutors put me under criminal investigation for Japanese passport fraud for over two years but was never arrested. My lawyer told me to go voluntarily into prosecutors office and be interviewed without a lawyer. Scary place. My lawyer told me to admit to wrongdoing, that I didn't know it was a crime, apologize and cry as best I can. Japanese justice. All charges dropped and never spent a day in prison.

7 ( +8 / -1 )

The Taylors are not so rich people, wasted a lot of money to prevent their extradition from USA to Japan and likely are not able to pay anymore for their defence. Pay for what? Not much will happen to them anyway, within a year or so they will be back in the States if they accept to be convicted in Japan and do not appeal the sentence. So, why not, show up as crybabies and get out soon of Japan.

That is the plan from day one.

No worry for them.

It is like a guest tour to become rich and famous later.

1 ( +1 / -0 )

SMART MOVE and courageous, saying sorry is the hardest thing to do.

4 ( +4 / -0 )

Weak as, stay staunch be strong, that what ghosen paid ya for, not to buckle and capitulate fall on your knees and beg for mercy.

Thought you special forces guys were tough , hard and could handle stuff, seems these guys looking for the easy money and the easy way out. Suspended sentence is the easy route.

All they doing is adding credence to the Japanese prosecutors case, implicating ghosen more n more..............pffffft.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

What is it with the father's in this scenario? Ghosn walked the grey areas of corporate and made tens of millions, until Japan corporate got tired of it went after him. He didn't have to, he had the chance if a life time to go to the U.S. but what, he got sentimental? I don't think so; I think he got comfortable (golden handcuffs) in so doing, did not think of his family's future wellbeing, only his own; then he got caught; then he hired another gem; this guy who of all people picked his own son to help commit a crime in another country no less; and again for nothing more than greed; probably and not wanting to pay full price for another accomplice, and wanted someone he could trust or 'use' in so doing, damned his son to even more torment. I swear, the leading men in this drama really are terrible father's. No matter how this plays out, both these males, are not men, and not true father's.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

I fully support them. I hate Japanese laws

-2 ( +4 / -6 )

LOL the americans are being told to apologize to show remorse. The lawyers have told them to do this to avoid a longer sentence and not to show the face of a cocky American with no regret. Their lawyers know the japanese courts are more lenient if one apologizes deeply. This has been shown in many cases where individuals to worse crimes bow deeply and say they are sorry and get less time in jail!

2 ( +3 / -1 )

Gregg Kelly decided to fight.

And he lost much money, health and 3 years of live in an endless trial.

Even if he wins, he lost it all in the way.

The Japanese "Justice" system punishes the innocents the most.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

My guess is the deal was worked out before they ever left the USA. They're being prudent now, showing remorse, letting Japan save face. It will probably work, I think they won't spend much time in jail.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

It's funny that these two clowns have essentially traded places with Ghosn.

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Let them go!

It is Japanese legal custom to be lenient with first time offenders who show remorse, and pay a compensation fine. (Suspended sentence). The catch is, especially when foreigners are concerned, Japan will milk this fine / compensation and it will be exorbitant.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

Something approaching half of all American males will be arrested at some point in their life.

Being arrested doesn't mean you are guilty. Innocent until proven guilty.

I was arrested 3 times in my life. Once in America, as a teen. No charges were filed in any of the arrests. The two arrests while out of the country where primarily because the cops didn't speak English and needed a translator to get the facts, then we were released. Wrong place, wrong time. I didn't do anything wrong. Since when is sitting on a public park bench on a Sunday afternoon an offense?

Been tear gassed with 1000+ others in Turkey. Wrong place, wrong time. We were just eating lunch and visiting with friends in on a patio restaurant. Not guilty of anything. Not arrested. Erdogan! We moved upstairs - tear gas flows downhill.

In Japan, the average criminal court case with a guilty plea takes 2.6 months. With a not-guilty plea, it is 8.5 months. If you know the state has proof you did something and that crying will show remorse to lesson the sentence, but not remove it completely, then it is best to shorten everything possible to get it over and leave that country ASAP. Simple math.

Are Japanese classes available in Japanese prison? As long as they are there for over 12 months, may as well become fluent.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

This is JAPANESE kabuki.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

It will be interesting to see what they'll say the on American TV once they're released from prison and allowed to go back.

This can potentially be a PR nightmare for Japan three years from now.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

Something approaching half of all American males will be arrested at some point in their life.

Being arrested doesn't mean you are guilty. Innocent until proven guilty.

I don't see your point. Do the math. In America, say you have a 80% chance of being convicted (actually well over 90% in federal cases), but a 33% chance of being arrested. In Japan, a 99% chance of conviction but a one in 100 chance of arrest (if that). That means roughly one in 100 Japanese being convicted of a crime compared to 26 in 100 Americans.

Also in the US, if you demand a trial, especially for white collar crimes or federal crimes like this, your case will drag out and the prosecutor will seek the maximum sentence to punish you for not taking the plea bargain.

Yes, Japan's justice system has big problems. But so does the US system, and I can't understand why Americans tolerate it. Being arrested should not be a common thing in a free country. Between the 2 systems, though, I like my odds in Japan better.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

They are playing the game. The same game rich and connected Japanese businessmen/politicians play. Say your sorry and bow. Act very remorseful. Doesn't actually mean he is sorry or remorseful. Special Forces guys, both active and retired are smart, hard individuals. They need to be considering the missions they have to undertake. They aren't going to crack because of some pushy lawyer or interrogator. Considering Taylors past, he knows what he is doing and was most likely instructed by his lawyers to say what he did to lessen whatever sentence is given him.

0 ( +2 / -2 )

They are playing the game. 

That's what all my lawyer friends tell me.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

I wonder if these guys play large musical instruments . . . . . or whether they have just started learning since arriving in Japan?

1 ( +2 / -1 )

@ Ulysses

Please understand that 1.3 m is only the amount they declared to I.R.S.

Jacobo

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

They have a good lawyer. In Japan, the best thing you can do is appear penitent, humble, apologize, and be ashamed. Or at least, appear to. :)

I just hope Ghosn is behind the scene, paying their lawyer. He owes them that much.

-3 ( +1 / -4 )

There's no point in fighting this. I am not surprised why JGov, MoJ and Tokyo Prosecutors are dragging this on. They are going to milk the PR out of these two, even though they already plead guilty.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

But so does the US system, and I can't understand why Americans tolerate it.

Do you watch the news? Everyday there's protest in the US and there are new laws and regulations discussed in Congress (blocked by Republicans, of course).

In Japan, there's nothing. Only "shoganai".

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

They will end up just getting suspended sentences.

-1 ( +1 / -2 )

I love watching the comments section of JT's news about Ghosn.

They are defending Ghosn like crazy and it's like they are followers of a cult!

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Doesn't Ghosn offer any support to this American?

It looks like Ghosn has abandoned them.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Sadly the J-system actually ENCOURAGES people to LIE in court.....

Would love to hear what they REALLY think once back in the States!

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

There's no point in fighting this. I am not surprised why JGov, MoJ and Tokyo Prosecutors are dragging this on. They are going to milk the PR out of these two, even though they already plead guilty.

At least, J Justice got a indisputable proof that Carole was also a main figure in this criminal conspiracy

All's grist that comes to his mill. Go get both GhosnS!

-2 ( +1 / -3 )

AlbertJune 30  07:16 am JST

Where is Ghosn when two people are being in court? Ghosn is laughing and doesn't care as long he is free.

Those two gentlemen knew what they did, and they decided to hel Ghosn. Now he is free and they are facing judgement.

Ghosn always he was innocent, but never there was proof. All documents were showing he was gelding back money.

And there we have it. Guilty until proven innocent.

3 ( +5 / -2 )

SlickdrifterJune 30  02:34 pm JST

I thinking anyone supporting Ghosn's escape should really take a look at the long term effects of this.

Anyone living in Japan like the fact you can leave your door open? Windows, relativity pretty much safe where ever you go. The organized crime syndicates and that element in this country keep to there own and fight and kill there own.

You are obviously unaware of the reality of how such groups operate. It's not like the movies.

3 ( +4 / -1 )

Please understand that 1.3 m is only the amount they declared to I.R.S.

If there's more, the IRS, among others, will certainly be interested to know what and where.

MIchael Taylor already has a criminal record in the US, and had $3 million seized from his company by the authorities. Mounting costs aside, he could yet lose his income from this adventure and face criminal charges in the US - regardless of whether he ever returns there or not. What a mess for such a smart guy who knows how to play the game.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I don't see your point.

My point is that 50+ people were arrested at the same location/time when I was arrested. Many were charged and most were convicted. I was never charged with anything. It was reasonable for them to arrest me, based on all the other people who were clearly guilty in the location.

Had I been alone at the same place, on a weekday, at 1pm, it wouldn't have been reasonable to arrest me.

These Americans broke Japanese law. Based on the level of effort and planning involved, this wasn't accidental. They knew what they were doing, but messed up by leaving traces. I'd think 1-3 yrs in prison is justice. They shouldn't get to keep any of the payment either.

And there we have it. Guilty until proven innocent.

Japan, Taiwan, China historically have similar historical legal systems - the Six Codes. Post WW2, some parts of the American legal system were added to the Japanese one - like having a defense attorney and the right to be silent. Also, the Chinese CCP removed the 6-codes. I think this is based on the Napoleonic Code ... which doesn't assume innocence.

No legal system is perfect. Some convictions are unjust and some guilty people are never charged. This happens in all legal systems.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

The Taylors, who have not been granted bail, are accused of playing leading roles in that escape. Prosecutors have described details of bank transfers and bitcoin payments, alleging Ghosn paid the Taylors the equivalent of $1.3 million.

The Taylors are an accomplice to the Gohsn escape out of Japan. Serious crime.

Am wondering who provided the name to get contacted to do this for him. They too are guilty. It’s all traceable.

-1 ( +2 / -3 )

Ghosn, husband and wife, are now more or less locked in Lebanon, with nowhere to go.

Funny you say this Lebanon has done what was required from interpol and they are now in the process of applying for the removal of the Red Letter, Japan has not completed its obligations to interpol regarding this matter and you will find that the Red Letter will likely be removed before much longer.

1 ( +4 / -3 )

Funny you say this Lebanon has done what was required from interpol

To issue a Red Notice, Interpol requires nothing of any state other than the applicant state (which as you well know wasn't Lebanon):

INTERPOL cannot compel the law enforcement authorities in any country to arrest someone who is the subject of a Red Notice. Each member country decides what legal value it gives to a Red Notice and the authority of their law enforcement officers to make arrests.

Japan has not completed its obligations to interpol regarding this matter

The Red Notice was issued, which means that by definition, Japan completed its obligations:

Every Red Notice request is checked by a specialised task force to ensure it is compliant with our rules. This review takes into account information available at the time of publication.

To have the notice removed, it has to be reviewed by the task force in light of "new and relevant information". Something that overrides what Japan has provided will be nearly impossible to supply: While in detention awaiting trial, Ghosn applied for and was granted bail through the Japan legal system. His name on the documents is an acceptance of their legal legitimacy. He put up security, again under his name, then absconded to the other side of the world. Those are facts that Japan was able to supply to Interpol. Ghosn practically signed his own Red Notice. He will not be able to argue it away, and nor will Lebanon on his behalf, even if they wished to.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

To have the notice removed, it has to be reviewed by the task force in light of "new and relevant information".

The United Nations confirmed that the arrest was arbitrary, and Ghosn Human Rights where not guaranteed.

That alone is enough.

Interpol won't disagree with the UN because they share funds and offices.

0 ( +1 / -1 )

Do you watch the news? Everyday there's protest in the US and there are new laws and regulations discussed in Congress (blocked by Republicans, of course).

New laws and regulations are exactly the problem in a police state. Like trying to put out a fire by dowsing it with petrol.

-1 ( +0 / -1 )

The Taylors put up a show in court. Very Japanese, apologizing bowing deep and try holding back tears. Find some nice words to say about Japanese people,culture and food. All in fn effort to get a suspended sentence , a very lenient one indeed.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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