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As yakuza weaken, police focus shifts to unorganized crime hired via social media

16 Comments
By MARI YAMAGUCHI

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As yakuza weaken, police focus shifts to unorganized crime hired via social media

What that division doing all day, really?

Known organized crime member, now already enter their retirement age, peacefully playing sports.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/sports/2023/02/10/more-sports/yakuza-softball-team/

.

There's new crime that really emerge, that's the one people should aware.

https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2024/05/06/japan/crime-legal/tokuryu-explainer/

-11 ( +3 / -14 )

Pokémon cards were a huge thing for about 6 months last year with everyone trying to cash in on an internet rumor that a new card would be worth ¥300,000. Naturally the crime groups and foreign resellers tried to cash in too. You would see them paying people for boxes of cards or opening them on the street and tossing aside anything that wasn’t valuable. It was pretty pathetic lmao

now that’s over since the speculation market over played their hand and the Pokémon company has flooded retailers with boxes of cards as a countermeasure. Just a funny few months seeing these people trying to make a quick buck off Pokémon cards in 2024. Reminded me of being I elementary school when the series first started and the craze was out of control

4 ( +5 / -1 )

sakurasuki, that url is behind Japan Times' paywall.

-1 ( +3 / -4 )

Disorganized crime seems easier to fight than organized.

8 ( +8 / -0 )

The Tokyo metropolitan police are currently investigating six suspects in their 20s and 30s, most of them without connections to one another, who are believed to have been hired on social media to kill, transport and burn the bodies of an older couple at a riverbank of Nasu, Tochigi Prefecture.

This is false, it's been on the news almost every morning. Most of the guys knew each other, but they did not have a strong connection, nor were members of a gang. And for sure there were not hired on social media.

1 ( +2 / -1 )

I feel the china-nese & vietnamese Triads pose more of a danger to Japanese society.

They have no code of conduct or honor like the Yaks.

The law should also go after the former two.

2 ( +4 / -2 )

If the height of IT sophistication here is faxing and transferring data in Excel on a USB stick, or sending a password-protected attachment in one email and the password in a separate email, and nobody even bats an eyelid at how incredibly secure and modern that is, do we honestly think the police will jump right on top of the problem and respond swiftly and efficiently? I mean, online crime is so cutting-edge and novel, right? It’s not like we’ve been dealing with it for the past twenty+ years or anything. But sure, let’s believe that "organizational restructuring and cooperation across investigative departments, from cyber to robbery and fraud" will revolutionise everything. Because, of course, it all comes to the "that’s how it’s always been done here" and "looking into things".

Anyone remembers wangiri here in late 1990s and "it is me" in early 2000s? The police here at the time said it was beyond their capabilities to do anything about it without setting up an entirely new department and spending x-billion on equipment, among a plethora of other convenient excuses, leaving the responsibility squarely with the operators. NTT DoCoMo, in its legendary efficiency, eventually implemented a system to prevent this—long after it was needed, naturally. But in a brilliant oversight, they ignored the simple fact that scammers would just use different numbers. Surprise, surprise, those calls persist to this day. Given that the police couldn't handle a much simpler situation back then, I'm absolutely convinced they'll handle online crime with the utmost efficiency and expertise now, just as they claim.

The Police here are most effective in dealing with serious crimes such as jaywalking, cyclist's earphones, or "there has been an increase in crime in this area recently", but not in dealing with organized crime or state level crime (corruption aka "it was just a dinner") and certainly will not be effective in dealing with "disorganized" organized crime such as this.

2 ( +3 / -1 )

A senior member of yakuza was arrested for allegedly stealing Pokemon cards near Tokyo in April...

Anyone else see the unintentional comedy in this? I'm trying to picture Tony Soprano doing it.

6 ( +6 / -0 )

Pokemon cards in national news..

Proving again and again that Japan is one of the safest countries to live in the world..

0 ( +3 / -3 )

Pokemon cards in national news.. 

Proving again and again that Japan is one of the safest countries to live in the world..

Yes, very safe for the large group of otaku.

-6 ( +2 / -8 )

Unorganized crime which was performed with organized criminals :)

in any group there should be the leader.

-2 ( +0 / -2 )

You would see them paying people for boxes of cards or opening them on the street and tossing aside anything that wasn’t valuable. It was pretty pathetic lmao

Sounds like those that bought dozens of AKB48 CDs just to get that golden ticket to meet them. Pathetic but pretty good marketing for the fiends lol

1 ( +2 / -1 )

anonymous gangsters and tech-savvy young people hired for specific jobs, obscuring the boundary between them and the yakuza...

"tokuryuu" maybe a menace to society but the kanji (匿流) is a carefully crafted piece of work. 

i take it to mean "hidden rank" where what is concealed is a young person (若)

police must drastically change their anti-organized crime measures to keep up with the new menace

good luck!!

0 ( +0 / -0 )

Totally anachronistic in this day and age - nobody should have any needs for yakuza or gangs of any description, they really should be finished now.

In rules-based Japan, almost everyone behaves reasonably, courteously, and considerately - this is all that anyone needs or expects here, and it's what makes Japan such a refreshingly different place to hang out in.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

Disorganized crime seems easier to fight than organized.

Generally it leads to more violent crime. Organizations tend to use violence in very specific ways and often with permission and direction. Average gang isn't as forward thinking about the consequences.

2 ( +2 / -0 )

MotMotMot

Generally it leads to more violent crime. Organizations tend to use violence in very specific ways and often with permission and direction. Average gang isn't as forward thinking about the consequences.

Exactly. Fundamentally, normal citizens on have to deal with the Mafia if they venture in to areas that the Mafia controls.

0 ( +0 / -0 )

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